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14th Field Artillery Observation Battalion

Discussion in 'History of America during World War II' started by Cheshire cheese, Feb 25, 2019.

  1. Cheshire cheese

    Cheshire cheese New Member

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    I arrive with a begging bowl again. I shall try not to outstay my welcome but its really difficult researching about 30 US Units from Britain who were resident locally. The above were part of Patton's Third Army and were stationed about 6 miles away at Marbury Hall in 1944. I know there is a history of the unit written in 1945 The Fighting 14th (Fourteenth Field Artillery Observation Battalion).
    Does anyone have a copy who could tell me whether it covers the time in England as well as their post D Day experiences? Does it discuss the nature of the camp, their reaction to it, the local people and what they did while they were there? Any help would be appreciated. I cannot get a copy in Britain to consult. Thank you all, CC.
     
  2. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Amazom says it's very expensive (like $500). Here's a summary from the site


    The Fighting 14th contains reminiscences and humorous stories written by the Men of the Fourteenth Field Artillery Observation Battalion. From the Forward: 'Presented here is the humorous word and picture story of the operations of this battalion during the war with Germany. Every officer and man of the Battalion has contributed more than his share in bringing the conflict to a successful close. Written and shown on the following pages is the sense of humor which at many times has taken the individual soldier, the battery, the battalion, and the army through apparently impossible situations. Into these line and pictures may also be read the grim realities of war which can be fully appreciated only by those who have faced a powerful enemy on the battle field.' Book includes many illustrations including 3 foldout hand drawn maps, a roster section, and 2 pages of photo collages. This description refers to Volume 1, First edition, 1945.
     
  3. Cheshire cheese

    Cheshire cheese New Member

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    Thank you Lou. I should have said I had seen the Amazon.com book offer, hence my reason for knowing of the book. The copies I have considered buying are in bookshops that will not ship across the Atlantic. Also, the last time I bought a book unseen to check out a point was to find that for $40 I managed to get a one sentence quote. At that rate of return with so many units to research, bankruptcy is a serious risk! I am hoping a reader of these exchanges has the book and can help out.

    The British National Archives for army records in my area do not keep records of which US units stayed at which sites. They just handed over whole sites to the US for several years and there is no reference to who was there at all. The best I have started to do is to obtain, where they exist, the troop train records that sometimes show the name of the US unit, the date they traveled and the start and finish stations. The station name then sometimes helps you identify the camp they were based at.

    However, knowledge of who was in a camp does not help give an idea of the life they led before they went to Europe and what they were doing to prepare for their destiny. I want to tell their story of what they did in Britain, because so little is, understandably, written on this subject. Most people want to read what their ancestors did on the front line. I want to tell why people ended up in Britain where they did. There are reasons worth explaining, such as for a simple example, why was the USAAF mainly in the east of Britain, and the Army mainly in the west. That one is easy, but there are many more questions that deserve an answer. Thanks again Lou.
     
  4. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    While it doesn't address your particular unit, you might look at David Reynold's book Rich Relations for a look at how US troops interacted with the British. Other than that, I can't help you. Have you posted you query at our sister site ww2talk? They have a more Commonwealth outlook and may be better equipped to help you. Good luck.
     

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