Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

A Naval P-47?

Discussion in 'Allied Aviation Of WWII' started by tony.osborne, Sep 11, 2016.

  1. tony.osborne

    tony.osborne New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2014
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    1
    via War44
    Looking for naval fighters on the web I found this article with pictures of Republic P-47 Thunderbolts embarked on aircraft carriers. There was a naval version of this plane? The report and photos, never seen by me before, can be viewed at the link below:


    http://aviacaoemfloripa.blogspot.com.br/2011/01/um-p-47-naval.html


    Best Regards!
     
  2. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Well-Known Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2006
    Messages:
    2,127
    Likes Received:
    557
    Location:
    Auburn, Alabama, US
    On your link there are comments that explain that they are being transported. I agree, the ones with no props, rudders, etc and covered look like that are cargo . The one's being flow off are more of a mystery. The P-47 is probably strong enough but lacks folding wings for storage , a critical problem.

    Someone with more knowledge that I , which is most of the membership, can explain the flying pictures. I personally have not heard of a naval version but seem to recall seeing P-47's attacking islands in the Pacific. My memory could be faulty and I am not referring to movies but WW2 footage. It could be auxiliary carriers carrying P-47's would not need maximum plane capacity but that is stretching it and conjecture. The Corvair seems pretty equal to the 47 and specifically designed for the job.

    A good question about the flying ones......to me.

    Gaines
     
  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    9,294
    Likes Received:
    1,321
    "Tony" just posts clickbait.
     
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    9,294
    Likes Received:
    1,321
    Google has pictures of P-47s taking off that include jeep carriers in the background. One is labeled "A P-47 Thunderbolt is pushed into position for take-off from the USS Manila Bay, Saipan, Marianas Islands, June 23, 1944". That is a good indicator that this kind of thing was done for replacement delivery.
     
    Otto and Sheldrake like this.
  5. Otto

    Otto No More Half Measures Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    8,987
    Likes Received:
    1,312
    Location:
    DFW, Texas
    tony.osborne was to War44.com what pampa14 was to WW2F. Same person, different name. In time we will merge all the aviation clock biat post together as well and these two accounts.
     
  6. Sheldrake

    Sheldrake Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Messages:
    1,373
    Likes Received:
    340
    Location:
    London UK
    Taking off from a carrier presents fewer problems for a land based aircraft than landing on one. WW2 naval aircraft such as the F4F, F6F and F4U had arrester hooks, strengthened undercarriage and folding wings. I dare say a skillful pilot could land a P47 on a big carrier, but it was a potentially fatal party trick not an act of war.
     
  7. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    9,294
    Likes Received:
    1,321
    Doolittle proved you could take off from a carrier deck with whatever you brung. The Wet Diaper Club is for those who have landed a plane on a flight deck.
     
  8. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Messages:
    2,922
    Likes Received:
    930
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
     
    A-58 likes this.
  9. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Messages:
    5,342
    Likes Received:
    679
    Lucky she has STOL ability or she'd never get off...impressive stuff.

    Poppy see the TR3B included in this at the end?
     
  10. Sheldrake

    Sheldrake Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Messages:
    1,373
    Likes Received:
    340
    Location:
    London UK
    Exactly. Doolittle's flight of heavily laden B25s,took off from a carrier. There was no question of trying to land the now lighter and empty B25s back onto a carrier. Eric "Winkle" Brown carried out the first deck landing by a twin engined aircraft, a mosquito.

    There are plenty of good flight simulators. Try it out yourself!
     
  11. Takao

    Takao Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    Messages:
    7,298
    Likes Received:
    1,466
    Location:
    Reading, PA
    You need to clarify that statement...Brown's landing was the first deck landing by a British twin engined aircraft.
    The Americans first achieved this back in 1927 with the USS Langley and a Douglas T2D.
     

Share This Page