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Adolf Auer's story, true or false?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by wm., Mar 4, 2018.

  1. wm.

    wm. Well-Known Member

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    Photos showing how a German fighter pilot painted a Jewish Star of David on his First World War plane just to annoy a racist Hermann Goering have come to light.
    Leutnant Adolf Auer wasn't Jewish himself but was upset when commanding officer Goering made anti semitic remarks about his own wingman, Willi Rosenstein.
    In revenge, Lt Auer painted the six-pointed Jewish symbol on the side of his Fokker biplane for Goering to see.

    According to Wikipedia Rosenstein frequently flew wingman to Hermann Göring. This site says the story is false.
     
  2. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member

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    Are there any more sites that refute the story in the DM? Who knows with that publication.
     
  3. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    In fairness, that link has almost as many theories as the original story.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2018
  4. wm.

    wm. Well-Known Member

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    Not quite, the conclusion is:

    Göring wasn't even in Jasta 40 with Auer; he made his comments while Rosenstein and he were both in Jasta 27.

    Adolf Auer told Peter Kilduff: "After the catastrophic air raid I received Rosenstein's old aeroplane. The silver outline of a heart, which was his battle symbol, was painted over and replaced with a six-pointed star. At the time I was unaware of the religious significance of the symbol and took it to be the commonly-seen beer brewer's emblem..."
    from Black Fokker Leader by Peter Kilduff

    it is more likely that Göring lost his temper when having a discussion with Willi Rosenstein, using some very stupid and insulting remarks, not so much because Rosenstein was a Jew, but more because Göring sometimes had difficulties controlling his temper (especially when criticized) and didn’t like Rosenstein and his likeability, and also because Rosenstein was a well-known personality (as a prewar pilot) who had integrity and was conscious of his own worth.
     
  5. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    But the conclusion of this reviewer is that the book contains several errors, including ones of translation.
    Truth is we're unlikely to know one way or the other-
    BLACK FOKKER LEADER
     

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