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Allies didn't use throat mikes?

Discussion in 'Military Training, Doctrine, and Planning' started by OpanaPointer, Jun 3, 2010.

  1. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I'm understanding that Allied track toads didn't use throat mikes. If this is the real deal may I just say WTF?
     
  2. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

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  3. Spaniard

    Spaniard New Member

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    Mr Pointer now you got me Confused :D YES They Did I've seen Many Pics
    Hold On ICCI Lets take a Looksiii

    Tank Helmet M-1938 & Related Equipment

    Two basic tanker helmet designs had been in use through the mid 1930’s. One of these had been developed by the Infantry, and the other one by the Cavalry. The basic purpose of both helmets in tank applications was to offer the tankler some protection from frequent bumps against the tank's interior.

    M-1938 tank helmets were introduced to the Armored Corps in 1941, even though the patent was not technically accepted until 12 May 1942. Manufacturing rights were granted to Rawlings Manufacturing Corporation, Sears Saddlery Company, Wilson Athletic Goods Manufacturing Company, and A.G. Spaulding & Brothers. Though essentially built to the same specifications, there were slight variations across the four manufacturers in terms of small details.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]


    Looks Like A Throat Mic to Moi !

    WWII Tank Helmet M-1938 & Related Equipment



    WWII T-30 Throat Microphone was the standard throat microphone used by the USAAF and other US Army branches (like armored crews);
    the T-30 series was a carbon microphone which works off the vibrations of the larynx for voice transmission.
     
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Thanks! The issue arose when I saw a German Panzer commander saying they had an edge on the Allies because they used throat mikes and the Allies didn't. Maybe they were talking about Russians?
     
  5. Spaniard

    Spaniard New Member

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    The Russian had a Defrent Type of Throat Mic, Not Like The Allies had the T-30, which was small They had a different System.

    The Bottom Link Shows You.


    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]

    Picture 8:The 10-R mounted in KV-1 tanks included a TPU-4 telephone system for the crew, and this illustration shows the throat microphone used for both the intercom and the 10-R/9-R sets. The throat mike was very uncomfortable, and you will often see Soviet tankers with the mikes hanging off their necks or the commander holding them in his hand while speaking. The binding strap was not elasticized, and it was not only very uncomfortable against the throat, but it had to be repeatedly adjusted in the field as the strap slipped. The straps were black, like the helmet, and the mike was aluminum colored. The 10-R also had provisions for a buzzer system connected to a button mounted on the outside rear of the vehicle. Supporting infantry could get the attention of tank crew inside by using this button, and basic signalling codes could be worked out to direct the tank's action in small ways. By 1944 an improved model was available for SU-152, IS-1, ISU-122 and ISU-152 vehicles, the 10-RK. This unit looked similar and the main improvement was a slightly extended range and more rugged components.


    [​IMG]

    This is the typical headphone set-up used in the Soviet tanker's helmet of WWII. In this case, the mike has been removed from its black throat strap, but the metallic intercom switch is still hanging on his right collar, with its distinctive aluminum receiver/transmitter switch. The black headphones fit into pockets on the side of the helmet, and there are flaps that can be buttoned closed to cover the holes when the headphones are not installed. During the first few years of the war, helmets were constructed of a similar pattern of brown leather and were subsequently hot, uncomfortable, and disliked. By 1942, most of the leather helmets had been replaced with these cooler black cotton types for use in the summer months, and insulated cloth/wool types that were worn in the winter, all with padded ribs in a similar manner. As a general rule, antennas were mounted close to the radio set inside the AFV.


    Soviet WWII Tank Radios
     
  6. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

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    Here is a decent article on the use of the "new" FM radio in the April, 1942 Popular Science which references a tanker's "throat mike" directly. Open up contents, and scroll down to page 82.

    See:

    Popular Science - Google Books

     
  7. sniper1946

    sniper1946 Expert

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  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    "Believe none of what you hear and half of what you read."
     
  9. Spaniard

    Spaniard New Member

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    You Got that right :D. You Told me one should paint with a wide Brush, but you'll need a tin one for all those small details :D Well I read many Times That Churchill's Books were very Believable as accurate accounts. :rolleyes: :D:D
     
  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Winnie's books are 100% accurate-ish.
     
  11. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..would it be an ''edge'' that was significant? I would think there would be too many factors involved
     

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