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American Sniper Rifles

Discussion in 'Small Arms and Edged Weapons' started by Colin, Dec 19, 2003.

  1. Colin

    Colin Member

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    I apologize for my last post about angels. I understand that has nothing to do with weapons and it won't happen again. Anyway, I wanted to know if the American forces had sniper rifles that weren't bolt action. I'm pretty sure that the Germans had built one called the Gewhr 43 which brings up the question, did we ever build something of the likes? Thankyou.
     
  2. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    As far as I'm aware, US and British sniping weapons throughout the war were bolt-action.

    You're quite right, the Germans produced the Gewehr 43 in a sniping version ( the weapon was designed from the outset with this use in mind ). Also, the MP44 was tested extensively with telescopic sights but, with its low-powered cartridge, could not be considered as an accurate long-range weapon.

    Soviet forces also used sniping variants of the Tokarev Model 1938 & 1940 (SVT) semi-automatic rifle.

    From what I have read, individual snipers in WWII ( and since, for that matter ) often preferred a bolt-action rifle for the reason that the greater moving bolt mass in a semi-auto tends to throw the sight way off the aim after a shot, making it very difficult for the sniper to gauge effect.

    A bolt-action, of course, has recoil ( which can be controlled by a skilled shot ) but no moving mass.
     
  3. 5-0-duce

    5-0-duce Member

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    the americans made M1 Garand sniper rifles but i'm not sure if they ever saw any action in WWII, pacific theater maybe? i know that they did in Korea though.
     
  4. Colin

    Colin Member

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    I think that snipers with semi-automatic sniper rifles would be better off if the enemy stormed their position because they would be able to shoot much more quickly than with a bolt action rifle. Speaking of which, did American snipers just use their sidearm for close combat, or did they use their sniper rifle?
     
  5. Major Destruction

    Major Destruction Member

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    I understand that the Garand sniper rifle was the standard issue from the time of D-Day on; perhaps earlier in the PTO, but snipers tended to choose their own weapon and the Springfield seems to have been favoured by the old hands.
     
  6. Colin

    Colin Member

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    Yeah, to be honest if I was in World War 2 and I had to choose a sniper rifle, I'd definitely pick the Springfield '03.
     
  7. Onthefield

    Onthefield Member

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    THE M1-D GARAND SNIPER RIFLE

    This rare firearm was adopted during World War II and saw continued service through the Korean and Vietnam Wars. The most noteable difference between the M1-D and the standard M1 Service rifle lies in the scope mounting system. The "D" incorporates a special barrel which is fitted with an integral mounting block or "base". The scope mount is attached to this by a large knurled knob, allowing for easy installation and removal of the telescope unit. The M84 scope is steel bodied with an adjustable post and cross hair sighting system. It's unique and rugged design allows for complete disassembly and repair as well a field-simple adjustments for windage and elevation.

    Here's some information that I posted in the interesting facts on weapons about the M1 sniper. :rolleyes:
     
  8. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    Mind you, IMHO if a sniper were to be stormed by the enemy, he's doing something wrong.... :confused:
     
  9. Stefan

    Stefan Cavalry Rupert

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    Actually IIRC the biggest benefit of a semi-automatic sniper rifle is that you do not have to disturb your position to cock the rifle, with a bolt action rifle you have to move your arm to cock the weapon which will change your aiming point albeit slightly, this is not so with a semi-auto.
     
  10. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    True, but with a full-power cartridge semi-auto the recoiling bolt tends to change the position for you whether you like it or not !
     
  11. Colin

    Colin Member

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    Well, that's very true Martinbull. If a sniper does get stormed by the enemy he probably is doing something wrong:)
     
  12. Kulbertinov

    Kulbertinov Member

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    The better snipers of WW2 had a spotter, who ussually had an SMG on hand. This was the case with Soviet snipers, they packed PPsH's to gaurd the snipers should they come under fire.

    I prefer the Mosin. Best looking rifle of WW2, IMO. And most of the 'top' snipers would agree with me.. Simo, the Russian snipers (hell there are a lot of them.. lol)
     
  13. Colin

    Colin Member

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    I thought the Russians had such a shortage of weapons that there snipers had spotters who carried the ammo and if the sniper was killed, the spotter would take the rifle and continue.
     
  14. Kulbertinov

    Kulbertinov Member

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    In some cases, most likely. However, in general, the spotters had a PPsH, if I recall correctly..
     
  15. Tomahawk720

    Tomahawk720 Member

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    The M1 Garrand was sometimes fitted with a scope and the M3, a variant of the M1 Carbine, had a scope on it.
     

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