Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Authors on the level of Cornelius Ryan

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mussolini, May 1, 2018.

  1. Mussolini

    Mussolini Gaming Guru Patron  

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2000
    Messages:
    5,647
    Likes Received:
    531
    Location:
    Festung Colorado
    I have read quite a few books on WW2 and must admit that 'A Bridge Too Far' by Cornelius Ryan is perhaps my favorite. I've gone ahead and ordered 'The Longest Day' and 'The Final Battle' by him as well.

    I am wondering if there are any other Authors - with books still in print/available from Amazon - that are on the same sort of level as Cornelius Ryan?
     
  2. bushmaster

    bushmaster Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2017
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    36
    By "same level" do you mean skill as a wordsmith, ability to tell a story, accuracy as a historian, Etc?
     
  3. Mussolini

    Mussolini Gaming Guru Patron  

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2000
    Messages:
    5,647
    Likes Received:
    531
    Location:
    Festung Colorado
    Yes - precisely. Other Authors who would rate right up there with CR.
     
  4. bushmaster

    bushmaster Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2017
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    36
    Ryan is my favorite storyteller. As far as readability, Rick Atkinson's trilogy on the US Army's involvement in WW2 is hard to beat. A gentleman named Brian Perret has written several interesting histories; my favorite being "Tank Tracks to Rangoon", a study of British/Commonwealth armor usage during the campaign in Burma. Tameichi Hara produced a very readable memoir of the Japanese side of the naval war in the SW Pacific, "Japanese Destroyer Captain".
     
  5. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    11,683
    Likes Received:
    1,108
    Location:
    Michigan
    I found Shattered Sword to be quite readable. If you like personal accounts Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors is hard to beat.
    In a completely different vein I found Rudel's (auto?) biography to be very readable (he was an unrepentant Nazi though).
     
  6. R Leonard

    R Leonard Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    707
    Likes Received:
    405
    Location:
    The Old Dominion
    Anything by John Lundstrom or Barrett Tillman
     
    USMCPrice likes this.
  7. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    13,198
    Likes Received:
    2,022
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    upload_2018-5-1_20-35-40.jpeg upload_2018-5-1_20-36-8.jpeg upload_2018-5-1_20-36-30.jpeg

    Try John Wukovits. His work is readable and I think pretty accurate. Above is a sample. I read Hell From the Heavens and found it quite good. I'm planning on reading the others.
     
  8. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2014
    Messages:
    3,090
    Likes Received:
    330
    Location:
    New England
    Wendy Lower is an excellent historian and writer. She writes extensively on the Holocaust and is a good researcher. It's a tough subject but she weaves an interesting story.

    Hitler's Furies
    The Diary of Samuel Golfard and the Holocaust in Eastern Galicia
     
  9. Terry D

    Terry D Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2015
    Messages:
    500
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    Huerta, California
    Walter Lord is of the same generation and general style as Ryan, a popular historian who excelled at weaving personal accounts into a dramatic narrative. He is best known for A Night to Remember, the classic account of the sinking of the Titanic, but he wrote very good, readable books about Pearl Harbor (Day of Infamy), Midway (Miracle at Midway) and Dunkirk (The Miracle of Dunkirk). I wouldn't go to these for highly sophisticated historical or military analysis, but they are as accurate as Lord could make them when he was writing in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s and the personal accounts in them are wonderful. If you want to know what it was like to actually experience these battles, you will enjoy Lord's work.
     
    LRusso216 and USMCPrice like this.
  10. Takao

    Takao Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    Messages:
    7,305
    Likes Received:
    1,469
    Location:
    Reading, PA
    IMHO, Edwin P. Hoyt and Eric Hammel are two quite readable authors. Although, both tend to focus on the Pacfic side of the war. I believe the majority of their works have stood the test of time.
     

Share This Page