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Barrel Life

Discussion in 'The Guns Galore Section' started by Ebar, Aug 8, 2005.

  1. Ebar

    Ebar New Member

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    A friend recently mentioned to me that the barrel life on modern AT guns is about 40 shots. Does anyone know if this is true and what kind of life span would you get out of AT guns of WW2 vintage?
     
  2. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    40 sounds really, really low to me, I always thought it was at least 100, maybe more, found this:
    at http://www.missing-lynx.com/reviews/mod ... ewell.html
    There's a bit on EFC (equivalent Full Charge) for artillery pieces at http://members.tripod.com/~nigelef/errorsmistakes.htm
    And we get
    from http://www.almc.army.mil/alog/issues/JanFeb03/MS841.htm. But the gun must be returned when it has 500 EFC left. Arjun apparently has EFC of 500... You pays your money and you takes your choice.
    Which makes think that your friend is way off.
    Point 1) Modern AT guns - which, and whose? Apart from Russia (Sprut) no-one really uses them do they?
    Point 2) The Sprut is actually just a carriage-mounted 2A46 (including laser sight!!) from the later T-series tanks. Which would not affect EFC life.
    Point 3) Contrariwise - the Russians tend to design for combat life, ie shorter life, therefore cheaper weapons, and therefore may have a reduced EFC, but I'd be surprised it it was much below 100, there's a fine line between making something last for a few shots, and making it unsafe to fire at all.
    Consider that if the barrel is useable for only 40 shots, then statistically some of them are not going to last for one, would YOU want to risk being crew on that one?
     
  3. FNG phpbb3

    FNG phpbb3 New Member

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    I know that ww 2 barrels also had what would be considered a low life when being fired constantly. You get stroies of german units firing their weapons to destruction in Normandy.

    I also assume that Russian tank barrels would last longer being smoothbore rather than rifled. Does this make a difference?

    Are the barrels binned at the end of their life or are they repaired in someway? Are they lined?

    So go on, what is the normal life span of various guns?

    FNG
     
  4. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    Belton Y Cooper in 'Death Traps' mentioned that barrel wear also speeds up the faster you fire the gun. It will last for more shots if you fire 1 round per hour than 10 rounds per minute.

    (The incident was the 105mm guns mounted in 'Priests' were shooting erratically, and turned out to have very worn barrels, despite firing less shots than they should. It was because they had been firing faster than they were supposed / expected to.)
     
  5. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    One of those sites also stated that some (artillery pieces admittedly) had an EFC of 1700!!
    Smoothbores maybe (maybe!) don't increase the life, because they tend to be fired at higher muzzle velocities - there's no rifling to wear out though, so accuracy might not degrade so quickly.
    Constant firing won't let the gun "recover" - but firing to destruction is nothing new - it's a case of do I defend myself, or do I follow the manual on rate of fire and number of rounds per day :lol:
    I'll go through some of my books and see if I can find anything on EFC and rate of fire links, how one affects the other, but like I said earlier, I'd be very surprised if any gun had an EFC of less than a 100 or so. (Service gun that is, experimental weapons have differing priorities. As a taster, how about this?
     
  6. Ebar

    Ebar New Member

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  7. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    So 110-130 at half or so of other nations' give a typical value of around 200-250 EFC, no?
    But again, the site notes that the life was short, and it's still over 100 shots.
    Must do some more digging, maybe Tony Williams knows a typical figure? Over to you Tony...
     
  8. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    Senility is setting in, save me :lol: I had the brilliant idea of digging out Ian Hogg's address/ phone number and asking him - if anybody would know, he would. And then I remembered he died a couple of years ago. However his Encyclopaedia of Artillery gives the following figures under EFC - up to 15000 for low-velocity howitzers, and 500 for tank guns (copyright date is 1987, make your own judgement on whether that value would have decreased [due to increased muzzle velocities], increased [due to improved materials science] or remained about the same [due to both]). I have a feeling one of my Brassey's series has something on barrel life, but I can never find the book I'm looking for...
     

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