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Browning M1918A2 Automatic Rifle or BAR

Discussion in 'Allied Light Weapons' started by Spitfire XIV-E, Aug 17, 2007.

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  1. Spitfire XIV-E

    Spitfire XIV-E New Member

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    The BAR dates back to WW1 and was designed by John Browning as a replacement for the French Chauchat and Hotchkiss M1909 light Machine Guns. It only saw limited use in the Great War but was further refined and developed afterwards. By 1940 the M1918A2 model was being issued to US Marine & Infantry Units and had by this time deleted the original BAR's Semi-Automatic selection. Instead 2 rates of Full Automatic Fire could be selected - Slow 300 - 450 rpm and Fast 500 - 650 rpm. It was intended to be used as a Light Machine Gun but because of it's slow rate of fire and 20 round box magazine it was more commonly used as a Squad Support Weapon, reverting to it's original role as a Shoulder Fired Automatic Rifle. US Soldiers were trained to operate the BAR in case the designated BAR Man was injured or killed. It wasn't without it's faults and suffered from inferior metal parts that corroded easily if not kept clean, A non interchangeable barrel which was prone to over heating, A Feed mechanism that was hard to access for cleaning and various other faults. US Infantrymen had to keep the weapon in good order or face the possibility of a jam whilst in combat. Nonetheless it proved itself a useful weapon particularly in the Pacific where US Marine & Infantry Divisions used it to clear out dug in Japanese Soldiers during the Island Hopping Campaigns through the Marshall, Gilbert & Marianas Island Chains. It also saw action in Europe and then on in to the Korean War and Vietnam in limited numbers.In 1942 the wooden Butt Stock was replaced by Fibreglass and later on in the war a barrel attached carrying handle was also added.


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    BAR Model M1918
     
  2. Jamie 111

    Jamie 111 New Member

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    Another great topic mate , and very informative as per usual.

    Machine guns are very apt to jam/overheat etc. (ref the Bren gun by Jim. and my comments)
    And they are the very devil to keep clean in the field! ...
     

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