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Can anyone identify which vehicle this engine belongs to?

Discussion in 'Allied Military vehicles used during WWII' started by Colonel Blunts, Mar 8, 2017.

  1. Colonel Blunts

    Colonel Blunts New Member

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    The vehicle behind it I believe is an Amtrak but I can't confirm if it belongs to it. This is at the Normandy Tank museum.
     

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  2. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

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    Appears to be a Continental R-975 off of a M4 Sherman. Also used in the M18 Hellcat and M7 Preist.
     
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  3. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

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  4. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

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    Think George is right though:
    Wright R-975EC.jpg
     
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  5. Takao

    Takao Ace

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  6. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

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    Actually, upon closer examination on a bigger screen, that is indeed an R-670.
     
  7. Colonel Blunts

    Colonel Blunts New Member

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    Okay so I did some more research and it's definitely an R-670 but this one was not for the M3. It was for the LVT-4 Water Buffalo that is standing right behind it. I found a picture of the same engine but further away so you can see. I also put a picture of the M3 Stuart's engine, they are the exact same. (How did I not realize this?!?) On a final note thank you for all your answers. 42phJRG.jpg 2114.jpg
     
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  8. Otto

    Otto No More Half Measures

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    Nice little mystery solved.

    Why the interest Colonel Blunts? Are these your personal photos?
     
  9. Colonel Blunts

    Colonel Blunts New Member

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    This is my hobby and what I do in my spare time. I have a Facebook page called 'World War II HD Archives' where I document all these photos and I want to give an accurate description of each picture. This one photo was bugging me and couldn't figure out what it was which is why I came to this forum.

    Check out my page if you like ― https://www.facebook.com/WWIIHDArchives/
     
  10. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

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    That series of LVT (Amtrac/Amtank), universally known as "Buffalo"; LVT-2, LVT(A)-1, LVT(A)-2, LVT(A)-4, LVT(A)-5 and LVT-4 used the M-3 Stuart powerpack (engine/transmission) and some running gear. Examples would be the propeller shaft and drive sprocket, they were from the Stuart with the outer sprocket ring modified to accept the pitch of the LVT's track. So you're correct the engines are exactly the same, completely interchangeable.
    The LVT(A)-1 used the turret and 37mm gun from the "Stuart". The LVT(A)-4 used the turret from the 75mm HMC M8.
     
  11. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Member

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    If I may i wiould like to tag a question on this thread as it inspired the question. Sections drawn through M3's as well as M4's using aircraft radials show them mounted vertically, with the drive shaft passing under the turret basket which I reckon accounts for some of the deck height of those tanks. I never knew the M18 was powered by a radial as the silhouette appears to be lower. Was the engine mounted in the same manner as the M3 and M4. My Honda Element has the engine transversely which caused me to wonder if the M 18 could have used a flat mounted radial and a 90 degree bevel get set in it's drive train . Pure conjecture on my part and the bevel gear might be over stressed but it would have made a lower tank.
     
  12. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

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    Propshaft in the M18 was dropped through a transfer: m18hellcatcross.jpg

    There was a concept of M4 with a transfer setup, but I'm not sure it was tested in the flesh:
    tankinside.jpg

    I've a suspicion that if you mounted a radial horizontally you might have some complex issues with cooling, airflow etc., and once you've put all the cooling and transfer stuff on, you'd be left with a lump similar in size to vertical. Also more complex to swap.
    Shooting from the hip, I imagine it just came down to simplicity. Straight shaft, easy lift possibly with a single hook etc. The aircraft radials were hardly ideal, and replaced fairly fast as better straights came online and flyboy demand increased - much was done with an air of 'will it do? Then do it', but you've got me wondering, Gaines, so I'll be having a shufti in a few books.

    This is fun, though.
    1925 Julian... apparently... with horizontal Radial:
    http://i.pbase.com/g1/58/673958/2/106520343.2JHGtxAW.jpg

    This is even better:
    https://oldmachinepress.com/2014/01/12/nordberg-stationary-radial-engine/
     
  13. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Member

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    Well thank you sir, I spend many hours a week drawing things in section, even design in section first then construct elevations based on that information. Whenever I see a plane, ship or AFV, especially WW2 era I imagine it in section. Yours were a big help and appreciated. Dropping the propeller shaft makes great sense but would not doubt slow production for a while and the angled shaft would work...or did work Getting air in and out of a flat radial would have been difficult now that you pointed it out.
    I was deliriously happy to be allowed to go inside that WW 1 Mark 1 female . at Bovington. Just a big rhomboidal box, gas tank bolted to the ceiling, , filler cap on the top. Gravity feed line to the engine below. rocker arms, spark plugs and wires exposed . Exhaust pipe exiting the top not far from the gas. Viewing slots were just bulges in the hull, padded with a single lawyer of leather so you could get your cheekbone and eye close to the slot. Dante on his best day, or is that worst, could not have conceived a more scary contraption. I would not have known that from the outside.

    Gaines
     

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