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Capture of Julius Streicher

Discussion in 'Concentration, Death Camps and Crimes Against Huma' started by Class of '42, Mar 30, 2020.

  1. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

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    A Holocaust survivor, whose mother and sister were killed in the genocide, said he locked a powerful Nazi prisoner in a shed for three days, made him strip naked and “pissed” on his face".

    “I told him, from now on, you sleep naked on this cold floor. You will not move,” Werner Meritz said.

    “And with that, I pissed all over him. Terrible thing to tell you. His head and everywhere. … I said, you’re just to lie there to get some sense of what you Nazis did to the Jews.”

    The captured Nazi was Julius Streicher, a friend and protégé of Adolf Hitler and the publisher of the notorious anti-Semitic newspaper Der Sturmer from 1923-45. His tormentor was one of a number of Jewish refugees from Europe who were recruited by the American military to interrogate Nazi prisoners during World War II.

    After spending three months at Buchenwald in 1938, Meritz came to the United States and worked on a secret project for two years. He then travelled to Europe near the end of the war to track down and interrogate Nazis there.

    When he captured Streicher, Meritz “flipped out,” according to sources.

    Trembling and crying with rage, Werner said he told his fellow soldiers he was going to exact vengeance.

    “I was enraged. I was trembling. There were tears in my eyes that I had captured this guy. I had him to myself,” he said.

    “I explained to the MPs, I’m gonna do things, you probably think I’m crazy. And you wanna know something? I am crazy. I’m crazed. I captured a Nazi of unbelievable mischief. … I’m gonna do what I have to do.”

    After three days of feeding Streicher only potato skins that he had also urinated on, Mertiz finally handed his prisoner off to American officers. Streicher was later one of 11 Nazis sentenced to death at the Nuremberg trials, he was hanged on 16 Oct 1946 for crimes against humanity..

    The records of Streicher’s capture are “spotty and contradictory,” and usually someone else is credited with capturing him, such as Major Blitt and a small detachment of the 101st Airborne Division. But an expert at the National Archives told her he thought Werner could have done what he said he did.
     

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