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Convoy battles

Discussion in 'Atlantic Naval Conflict' started by Kai-Petri, Feb 15, 2004.

  1. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Here´s one example:

    SC-104

    Sydney - UK
    12 Oct, 1942 - 16 Oct, 1942


    The Convoy 48 ships

    U-boats
    The wolfpack Wotan of 10 boats U-216 (Kptlt. Schultz), U-221 (Kptlt. Trojer) *, U-258 (Kptlt. von Mässenhausen), U-356 (Kptlt. Wallas), U-410 (Kptlt. Sturm), U-599 (Kptlt. Breithaupt), U-607 (Kptlt. Mengersen) *, U-615 (Kptlt. Kapitzky), U-618 (Kptlt. Baberg) *, U-662 (Korvkpt. Hermann)

    The wolfpack Leopard of 7 boats: U-254 (Kptlt. Loewe), U-353 (Oblt. Römer) ++, U-382 (Kptlt. Juli), U-437 (Kptlt. Schulz), U-442 (Korvkpt. Hesse), U-620 (Kptlt. Stein), U-661 (Oblt. von Lilienfeld) *

    * U-boats that fired torpedo or used the deck gun

    18 ships sunk for a total of 44.729 tons from convoy SC-104

    The details and more convoy battles:

    http://uboat.net/ops/convoys/sc-104.htm
     
  2. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    SC 7 had lost 20 ships out of 35, of which seven fell to Kretschmer's U-99. The total tonnage lost was 79,592 GRT. The arrival of convoy HX 79 in the vicinity had diverted the U-boats and they went on to sink 12 ships from HX 79 that night. No U-boats were lost in either engagement. The loss of 28 ships in 48 hours made 18 and 19 October the worst two days for shipping losses in the entire Atlantic campaign. The attack on SC 7 was a vindication of the U-boat Arm's wolfpack tactic, and was the most successful U-boat attack of the Atlantic campaign. The convoy escort was ineffective in guarding against the attack. Convoy tactics were rudimentary at this early stage of the war. The escorts' responses were uncoordinated, as the ships were unused to working together with a common battle-plan. Command fell to the senior officer present, and could change as each new ship arrived.[3] The escorts were torn between staying with the convoy, abandoning survivors in the water, as DEMS regulations demanded, and picking them up, leaving the convoy unprotected and risking being torpedoed themselves.[

    Convoy SC 7 - Wikipedia
     

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