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Dad's Discharge Paper

Discussion in 'Military Service Records & Genealogical Research' started by LRusso216, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I finally got around to posting my father's Discharge work. Oddly, his CIB isn't listed, but it, along with his Bronze Star came in the set of medals I received.

    View attachment 12652
     
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  2. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    Have we ever figured out what AW 107 is and what the Time Lost refers to? Some give a number of days while others record "No Time Lost under AW 107". Does that refer to leave?
     
  3. VET76

    VET76 Member

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    Great question former jughead......I have wondered that same thing just have not asked about it. What does that mean?
     
  4. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I think it refers to time lost because of some infraction. I found this while searching around
    "ART. 107. SOLDIERS TO MAKE GOOD TIME LOST. Every soldier who deserts the service of the United States, or who without proper authority absents himself from his organization, station, or duty for more than one day, or who is confined for more than one day under sentence, or while awaiting trial and disposition of his case, if the trial results in conviction, or who through the intemperate use of drugs or alcoholic liquor, or through disease the result of his own misconduct, renders himself unable for more than one day to perform duty shall be liable to serve, after his return to a full duty status, for such period as shall, with the time he may have served prior to such desertion, unauthorized absence, confinement, or inability to perform duty, amount to the full term to his enlistment."

    Read more: Answers.com - What is AW107 in military terms

    I do remember my father saying he had been busted a couple of times, I would assume for some "intemperate" activity.
     
  5. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    This is the other side of my father's Separation Qualification
    [​IMG]
     
  6. VET76

    VET76 Member

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    That is really cool Lou. Seems like there is a lot of variance on discharge paperwork even among WWII vets. I know when I was in My DD214 looks exactly like everyone elses. Seems as thought they were still perfecting military paperwork at the time....lol

    Wait....this is not discharge paperwork is it?
     
  7. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    The two documents I just posted are actually two different papers. I haven't seen anyone else post the Separation Qualification one, but I like it because it shows the different units he actually served in. They both provide a wealth of information about his service. The Honorable Discharge paper does seem to be the same as the others I've seen posted.
     
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  8. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    Should have saved that salute for that post. I'll make it up to you though.
    Judging by his "Chronology" you posted it looks like he was promoted from Cpl to Pvt while in the Coast Artillery.
     
  9. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I'm not sure if that "promotion" occurred while in the CA, or when he became an infantryman. I am also of the opinion (based on his comments) that it happened more than once.
     
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  10. VET76

    VET76 Member

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    I really wish I could find my Grandpas "Separation Qualification" paperwork. Maybe it will come with his information we requested from the NARA. Very cool document, Lou......
     
  11. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

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    That is so cool Lou, and I must say that I had one uncle who was so "yo-yo" that he used to say his stripes should have been put on with zippers. Today one would say with Velcro.

    Uncle Erwin was bounced between Pvt., Sgt. and back to Pvt. so many time in his years in the US Army of the WW2 period, and afterwards nobody was sure what his veteran benefits should be. He was a "card" though, and a great friend for a kid to have in the fifties.
     
  12. Earthican

    Earthican Member

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    Bump

    I'm not sure if inactive threads disappear but I find it troubling that the last message on the last thread was 3 Feb 2011 (I checked 2 Feb 2012).


    I find this veteran's story unique. When history books discuss the shortage of infantrymen, it is often sited that anit-airacraft artillery units were converted to infantry. I know many were disbanded in the US and the men sent into the replacement system, but I think it was somewhat rare for whole AA battalions to be converted into infantry battalions.

    According to the army official history for the Italian campaign, the 434th and 900th AA Battalions went into the frontline as infantrymen before becoming part of the 473d Infantry. I wonder about the details of that process. Did they first go into the line as rifle-armed gun crews and batteries? Once converted to an infantry battalion, how did the leadership learn their new trade as infantrymen?

    In other veteran's memoirs I have read that the Army had particular qualifications for being declared a trained infantrymen. I wonder if the people in charge of converting AA battalions made any attempt to meet those requirements.
     
  13. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Thanks for the bump. I had forgotten that I posted it.

    I never heard my father speak of any "training" he received as an infantryman. I spoke with the head of the 473rd Association and he didn't mention it either. Major McQuade (I believe he was a captain then) seems to have moved directly from the 900th to a command of the 473rd. I'm not sure how or when this occurred, and sadly, I think the members of Company K (with whom I was familiar) have passed away. This same transfer appears to have happened to most of the men since the same people showed up in the 505th (which they were in prior to the 900th) and later in the 473rd. I suspect they went into Salerno as armed AA men who were "trained" on the go.
     
  14. Earthican

    Earthican Member

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    Staton cites the 434th AABn became the 1st Bn 473d Infantry, 532d AABn became 2/473d Infantry, 900th AABn became 3/473d Infantry and the 435th AABn became HQ 473d Infantry (not sure what HQ means, maybe HQ Co and Service Co). So I assume you mixed up the 505th?

    But why do you think they were acting as infantry at Salerno? If it was an emergency, do you think they switch back to AA until the fall of 1944 in the Appenines?

    I did think it was possible that after their initial employment on the frontline, before they became the 473d Infantry, that they felt they learned enough about infantry combat. And they would have, for the most part, except maybe attack techniques.

    Then, of course, many veterans comment in their memoirs that training seemed useless once they got on the frontline. Or rather there was so much that training did not prepare them for.

    Thank you for this thread and your father's colorful service.
     
  15. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    The 505th became the 900th AA. It was only the 900th for a short time before it was moved into the 473rd. I've seen the invitation for the reunion (CO. K) that had both the 505th CA and the 473rd Infantry. The 473rd was the unit my father most talked about, as did the other members of Co. K. I was fortunate to attend some of the reunions, but I was only a child and went to bed before the men started talking about their time in service.

    My father always said that they became infantry when "there were no planes to shoot down" I remember him talking about being pinned down on the beach at Salerno, so I assume he went in as infantry, even though the official changeover did not take effect until later.

    Stanton seems to support the change from the 505th to the 900th, as does Mr. Good, the head of the 473rd Association.
     
  16. Earthican

    Earthican Member

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    OK, my mistake and it was only recently that I learned that the Coast Artillery Regiments were disbanded to form the various AA Bns. At 45+ my short term memory is already shot.

    I checked Stanton and it states the 505th CA "assaulted Salerno". It would take some checking to see if they came in as 'hasty infantry' or as an AA unit that came under attack and picked up their rifles or some other battlefield contingency.

    I saw you had mentioned posting the 473d Infantry regimental history elsewhere. With some effort I tracked it down starting at this post:

    http://www.ww2f.com/photographs-documents/20781-sharing-copies-wwii-documents-4.html#post356910

    The history mentions some plan to be trained as infantry after they had been in the line for a defensive mission, but that plan was cut short in the spring of 1945.
     
  17. seacon

    seacon Member

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    William R. McQuade, was a US Army Infantry officer rising to the rank of Major while serving with the 473rd Inf Regt. There is a good chance that he was a former CA officer "converted" into infantry when the 473rd was formed.
     
  18. seacon

    seacon Member

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    Initial deployment of the original AAA Bns is unrelated to the 473rd Inf Regt. All four had some combat experience by the time it was decided to convert them into Infantry. The 900th had the least...
    rgds
    M
     
  19. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I met Bill McQuade several times. I seem to remember him being part of the 505th as Captain. I'd have to check further.
     
  20. seacon

    seacon Member

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    Did he live in Allegheny County?
    m
     

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