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Dear Mrs. Joe

Discussion in 'Non-fiction' started by Doughboy, Dec 26, 2008.

  1. Doughboy

    Doughboy Member

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    Background Information: Shorty after arriving in North Africa, a young private wrote a letter to his wife who he affectionately called "Mrs. Joe". He kept this with him until he either returned to the U.S. in person or his belongings were delivered in the event of his death overseas.

    Author: Pvt. John D. (Jack) Boyer

    Setting: North Africa, 1943


    Dearest Joe,

    I hope and pray that when you read this that we are together again and can have one of those big laughs at a very foolish thing. Right now however, it doesn't seem foolish to be doing the writing.

    Some of us are laying here outside of Algiers, North Africa as a rear detachment just waiting for the invasion of Europe to start and then we are to follow. The rest of the battery is down in Oran and they are going to lead the way in. We have all the equipment fixed to land on any beach and are just waiting for orders to move out.

    I had another one of those chalk drawings made like we did at Geneva and am going to send it along to you as soon as we rejoin the battery and can send out mail. If I never get a chance to mail it Uncle Sam will, so you'll get it some time.

    I just felt in the mood for talking to you this morning and wanted to tell you how much I love you and how I have missed you all these months I have been working for our Uncle.

    I'm going to carry this with me from here on out and the only chance you have of ever reading it will be when I am home once again or else never likely to come home at all. If the last is the case please always remember that you were ever in my thoughts and I loved you so much that it sometimes hurts to think about it. I take out the picture I have every once in a while and get myself a good case of the red-ass.

    It is a good thing that all you can buy over here to get drunk on is wine and I can't drink the stuff. I could sure go on some dandy tears if i could just get the stuff to do it with.

    Well honey I guess this one sheet will be about all I'll be able to carry in my wallet so I'm signing off now still hoping we can read this together and laugh over it.

    All my love and kisses,
    Jack
     
    macrusk and Skipper like this.
  2. redfan45

    redfan45 Member

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    Is this real?
     
  3. Doughboy

    Doughboy Member

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    Every word. The paper it was originally written on is almost torn and the writing is a little hard to make out in some places. My Grandmother kept it in a scrapbook with the Western Union telegrams she got and pictures she has from the entire time my Grandfather was overseas.

    Thanks,
    Dave
     
  4. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

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    Sweet, so I assume he got home safe and that Mrs Joe could read it?
     
  5. Doughboy

    Doughboy Member

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    Fortunately he did. As a side note, I also have the chalk drawing he had made. Even after many years, the colors are still pretty bright on the piece of parchment paper.

    Thanks,
    Dave
     
  6. luketdrifter

    luketdrifter Ace

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    Wow, how awesome. Awesome. Cherish that stuff, and don't be like the folks I see with stuff on eBay. Tell that story to your kids, keep it alive. You'll be glad you did.
     
  7. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    What a great treasure. My almost 85 year old mother still has the letters she received from my father when he was in Africa and Italy. She wants to keep them until she passes on, then they come to me. She has already given me many photos and other items (including papers and medals) that belonged to my father. Keep these things safe and cherish them. My children and grandchildren (who didn't get a chance to really know my Dad), already know his story and see the memorial I have for him. Pass along your knowledge and heritage.
     

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