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Effectiveness of building a true night fighters

Discussion in 'Axis Fighter Planes' started by Zach gibson, May 23, 2018.

  1. R Leonard

    R Leonard Member

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    Rails? I don't know anything about trains.
     
  2. green slime

    green slime Member Patron  

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    I traveled Helsinki to Hong Kong by train once...
     
  3. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

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    Did the Russian leg of your journey look something like this?

    [​IMG]
     
  4. green slime

    green slime Member Patron  

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    The Russian leg was great. It was the Chinese Chicken feet that was terrifying.
     
  5. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    The allied bombing could have been more effective without the propagandistic comments Germany will be bombed to kingdom come and Germany will be turned to potato fields. The German soldiers said these views made them fight harder and also seeing their families bombed dead every night. I am not the best to say how to continue but definitely Göbbels got a lot of help he did not need even if German Cities got beaten hard.
     
  6. harolds

    harolds Member

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    That, and the premature announcement of the "unconditional surrender" doctrine.
     
  7. Carronade

    Carronade Ace

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    As I understand it, the fighters in the three-plane "Bat" teams were standard F6Fs, guided by the radar-equipped Avenger because they did not yet have radar of their own.

    The F6F-3N etc. were exceptions to the rule that night fighters needed a separate crewman to operate the radar, which was why nearly all of them in WWII were twin-engine. The Navy pilot had to do the work of two men, not to mention that looking into a glowing screen ("heads-down") might conflict with the "heads-up" job of flying and fighting the aircraft.
     

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