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Flak-Rgt 8 Music instrument question

Discussion in 'WWII General' started by MarChant, Jul 24, 2021.

  1. MarChant

    MarChant Member

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    Don't really know where to ask, so I post it in "general discussion"...Mods, please move if not appropriate here...

    I recently bought a Horn on eBay, as one of my other hobbies is collecting and playing (vintage) brass instruments. I was pleasantly surprised when I received it and discovered it was engraved "Flak-Rgt 8 2." wich wasn't shown or mentioned in the listing on eBay.

    Now I would like to know if it's possible to find out more of it's history. All I know is it was built in 1936 and was sent to me from Poland.
    Some specific questions:

    - did every German unit have it's own music unit?
    - what exactly does "Flak-rgt 8 2." mean?
    - are there any pictures/movie clips of the music unit of Flak-rgt 8?
    - where to find names of musicians of Flak-rgt 8?
    - general history of "Flak-rgt 8 2."

    Any other information regarding this subject is also welcome.

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  2. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Most likely it is Flak-Scheinwerfer-Regiment 82., which was formed July 1941 in Berlin as Flakscheinwerfergruppe Berlin, from various Scheinwerfer (searchlight) batteries, as an ortsfest of fixed rather than a mobile (motorisiert) or semi-mobile (verlegbar) unit. It was redesignated Flak-Scheinwerfer-Regiment 82. on 1 November 1943, so the horn probably came into possession of the Regiment after that. Note that the horn player was likely part of an unofficial regimental band and would not be found in the more mobile field units.
     
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  3. MarChant

    MarChant Member

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    Interesting possibility, but why then the significant space between the 8 and the 2? That seems weird, to me it seems not very likely they indeed meant 82. Also, wouldn't the correct abbreviation then be "Flak Schw Rgt"?
     
  4. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Yes that is possible. However, I suspect it the space is more a result of poor engraving than intent. Note that the "2" is followed by a period. The period in the German military indicates an ordinal number. In English, it would read as "2nd" or "Second", which makes no sense, there was no 2nd 8th Regiment or Eighth Second Regiment, and that would appear as "8. 2." in any case.

    However, assuming that some version of the 8th Flak Regiment was meant leads to another problem. The "2." in that case would indicate the Second Battery of the regiment, except that would then appear as 2./Flak-Rgt 8. Furthermore, it is extremely unlikely that a bandsman would be part of a battery, especially in 2./Flak-Rgt 8., which was part of the I. Abteilung (battalion)...that never served with the regimental headquarters (Stab/Flak-Rgt 8.). Instead, it was a mobile mixed battalion, serving with the field army and was destroyed at Stalingrad, before it was reformed in Greece in June 1943.

    The correct abbreviation should have been Flak-Sw-Rgt 82., but either the engraver messed up - most likely given messing up the spacing - or was paid by the letter and the Luftwaffe was cheap. :D The last possibility, also very likely, was the engraving was a postwar addition to spice up the horns history.
     

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