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For the other Astronuts out there

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by Biak, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    I think it’s worth being a little sceptical…I watched an announcement only yesterday of Webb finding galaxies much much bigger than they were supposed to be…to the point of throwing out an old conception of early galaxies…So too distance measuring relays on what we KNOW and of course cannot factor in things we don’t know….like dark matter. and by definition I cannot tell you what else is missing from the equation. Can you judge how far a person is from you if looking through heat haze? (If you weren’t aware of the haze. For example). Science is great, but only as good as the information available.
     
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  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    First off, you won't hear legit astronomers saying that we know everything already. We will probably be learning new things and refining old things for the next few thousand years. It's a dynamic process, new information adds to old, or replaces old, information. We'd find it strange if someone said they knew everything there was to know about military history, right?
     
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  3. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Well said.
     
  4. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    It’s the changing of explanations that throws me off.
    Question : If a Blackhole can bend the fabric of Space does it also add gravity assist to the speed of light coming from a distant Galaxy ?
     
  5. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Yes, and the "gravitational lensing" has characteristics that tell us that's what we're seeing there.
     
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  6. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    Does that mean the speed of light increases as it passes by ?

    Hey I'm learning here !
     
  7. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    Addendum: Just saw this and wanted to toss it in;

    www.nbcnews.com/news

    "
    By The Associated Press

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Astronomers have discovered what may be the brightest object in the universe, a quasar with a black hole at its heart growing so fast that it swallows the equivalent of a sun a day.

    The record-breaking quasar shines 500 trillion times brighter than our sun. The black hole powering this distant quasar is more than 17 billion times more immense than our sun, an Australian-led team reported Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy."
     
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  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]


    Seagull Nebula over Pinnacles' Peak
    Image Credit & Copyright: Dheera Venkatraman


    Explanation: The bird is bigger than the peak. Nicknamed for its avian shape, the Seagull Nebula is an emission nebula on the night sky that is vast, spanning an angle over five times the diameter of the full moon and over 200 light years. The head of the nebula is catalogued as IC 2177, and the star cluster under its right wing is catalogued as NGC 2343. Consisting of mostly red-glowing hydrogen gas, the Seagull Nebula incorporates some dust lanes and is forming stars. The peak over which this Seagull seems to soar occurs at Pinnacles National Park in California, USA. The featured image is a composite of long exposure images of the background sky and short exposure images of the foreground, all taken consecutively with the same camera and from the same location.
    Explore Your Universe: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: open space​
     
  9. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    Oopsie, just found another mind bender; space/cosmology/james-webb-telescope-finds-ancient

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has found a galaxy in the early universe that's so massive, it shouldn't exist, posing a "significant challenge" to the standard model of cosmology, according to the study authors.


    The galaxy, called ZF-UDS-7329, contains more stars than the Milky Way, despite having formed only 800 million years into the universe's 13.8 billion-year life span. This means they were somehow born without dark matter seeding their formation, contrary to what the standard model of galaxy formation suggests.

    other inexplicably massive galaxies in the early universe, it threatens to upend our understanding of how the first matter in the universe formed, or possibly even the standard model of cosmology itself. The researchers published their findings Feb. 14 in the journal Nature.
     
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  10. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    Okay this ain't exactly astrophysics but then again the similarities are interesting:

    More to the story in the link.

    " Magnetic effects at the origin of life? It's the spin that makes the difference

    The so-called homochirality of life—the fact that all biomolecules in living organisms only ever occur in one of two mirror-image forms—has puzzled a number of scientific luminaries, from the discoverer of molecular chirality, Louis Pasteur, to William Thomson (Lord Kelvin) and Nobel Prize winner Pierre Curie.

    A conclusive explanation is still lacking, as both forms have, for instance, the same chemical stability and do not differ from each other in their physicochemical properties. The hypothesis, however, that the interplay between electric and magnetic fields could explain the preference for one or the other mirror-image form of a molecule—so-called enantiomers—emerged early on.

    It was only a few years ago, though, that the first indirect evidence emerged that the various combinations of these force fields can indeed "distinguish" between the two mirror images of a molecule. This was achieved by studying the interaction of chiral molecules with metallic surfaces that exhibit a strong electric field over short distances.

    The surfaces of magnetic metals such as iron, cobalt or nickel thus allow electric and magnetic fields to be combined in various ways—the direction of magnetization is simply reversed, from "North up—South down" to "South up—North down."

    If the interplay between magnetism and electric fields actually triggers "enantioselective" effects, then the strength of the interaction between chiral molecules and magnetic surfaces should also differ, for example—depending on whether a right-handed or left-handed molecule "settles" on the surface.
     
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Scientists love finding things that upset the apple cart, that's how they rise above the herd. It's not bad that they find puzzles, it shows that their minds are still open to new information. The ones that don't fall by the way side and end up running a planetarium in Keokuk, Kansas.
     
  12. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    I thought Keokuk was in Iowa. Way a minute - it is in Iowa, I've been there several times.
     
  13. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I make my own maps. Makes for shorter driving time to Tierra del Fuego.
     
  14. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]

    A View Toward M106
    Image Credit & Copyright: Kyunghoon Lim


    Explanation: Big, bright, beautiful spiral, Messier 106 dominates this cosmic vista. The nearly two degree wide telescopic field of view looks toward the well-trained constellation Canes Venatici, near the handle of the Big Dipper. Also known as NGC 4258, M106 is about 80,000 light-years across and 23.5 million light-years away, the largest member of the Canes II galaxy group. For a far far away galaxy, the distance to M106 is well-known in part because it can be directly measured by tracking this galaxy's remarkable maser, or microwave laser emission. Very rare but naturally occurring, the maser emission is produced by water molecules in molecular clouds orbiting its active galactic nucleus. Another prominent spiral galaxy on the scene, viewed nearly edge-on, is NGC 4217 below and right of M106. The distance to NGC 4217 is much less well-known, estimated to be about 60 million light-years, but the bright spiky stars are in the foreground, well inside our own Milky Way galaxy.
    Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space​
     
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  15. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    Notice the tilt of all those Galaxies? They're each heading somewhere else. Regardless of the expansion of the Universe. Just another over thinking it?
     
  16. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    The rotational vector of a galaxy doesn't dictate its direction of travel. The galactic "local groups"* pull their members along. Remember that every local group is heading away from every other local group. Strangely like the first nanosecond of an atomic bomb detonation.

    *Think of roaming packs of GALAXIES!
     
  17. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]

    The Pencil Nebula Supernova Shock Wave
    Image Credit & Copyright: Helge Buesing


    Explanation: This supernova shock wave plows through interstellar space at over 500,000 kilometers per hour. Centered and moving upward in the sharply detailed color composite its thin, bright, braided filaments are actually long ripples in a cosmic sheet of glowing gas seen almost edge-on. Discovered in the 1840s by Sir John Herschel, the narrow-looking nebula is sometimes known as Herschel's Ray. Cataloged as NGC 2736, its pointed appearance suggests its modern popular name, the Pencil Nebula. The Pencil Nebula is about 800 light-years away. Nearly 5 light-years long it represents only a small part of the Vela supernova remnant though. The enormous Vela remnant itself is around 100 light-years in diameter, the expanding debris cloud of a star that was seen to explode about 11,000 years ago. Initially, the section of the shock wave seen as the Pencil nebula was moving at millions of kilometers per hour but has slowed considerably, sweeping up surrounding interstellar material.
    Tomorrow's picture: light-weekend​
     
  18. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    I see it as galaxies move in a direction relative to their rotation. Moving inline to their equator and each taking it's own path. Clusters move together but in gravity packs(?) . Every clear picture shows every Galaxy tilted in a different angle and who's to say which direction its headed. Could be along it's rotation left or right, could be in a flat spin "up or down", could be a combination of Left-Up-Away.
     
  19. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    The direction of rotation has nothing to do with the direction of travel. If a gravitational group has, say, 25 galaxies then that's the mass of the group. Some of the galaxies could be "on right angles" to the direction of travel, it wouldn't matter. Imagine the forces involved when you can treat an entire galaxy as a single unit.
     
  20. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]

    Odysseus to the Moon
    Image Credit: Intuitive Machines


    Explanation: Intuitive Machines' robotic lander Odysseus has accomplished the first U.S. landing on the Moon since the Apollo 17 mission in 1972. Launched on a SpaceX rocket on February 15, the phone booth sized lander reached lunar orbit on the 21st and touched down on the lunar surface at 6:23 pm ET on February 22nd. Its landing region is about 300 kilometers north of the Moon's south pole, near a crater designated Malapert A. Resting on its side, the lander is presently collecting solar power and transmitting data back to the Intuitive Machines' mission control center in Houston. The mission marks the first commercial uncrewed landing on the Moon. Prior to landing, Odysseus’ camera captured this extreme wide angle image (landing legs visible at right) as it flew over Schomberger crater some 200 kilometers from its landing site. Odysseus was still about 10 kilometers above the lunar surface.
    Tomorrow's picture: Phoenix over Iceland​
     

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