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For the other Astronuts out there

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by Biak, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    If you treat it like I do…as a mental exercise. Picturing an alternate or more intricate life. One can buy into this with little side effects. There’s truck loads of testimony from people you want testimony from…Information, that if made up is still incredibly interesting and mind expanding. You don’t have to beleive to study more. Pretty quickly you can discern those that are trying to sell something and those who just wanted ‘their’ truth be known. Stories begin overlapping in detail and the big picture begins to fill in…
     
  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I find most of the ... entertaining theories ... to be rather pedestrian. I've loved scifi since a found a copy of Bullard of the Space Patrol when I was in the sixth grade.
     
  3. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Was into SciFi at 3 watching doctor who…then star trek…etc etc.Went to the movies to watch the first Star Wars. And had a bunch books from buck rogers annual, to more serious looks at future science.
    upload_2024-3-2_13-46-55.png

    You have to dig deeper OP…
     
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Deeper for what? I wasn't try to start a contest, I was providing context.
     
  5. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Dig deeper for the stories better than ‘pedestrian’…
     
  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Been reading scifi since 1963. I did say "most", not "all". As the famous philosopher said "99% of everything is crap."
     
  7. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    I read enough of von Daniken in the late sixties to make me a believer. I also read enough of Mein Kampf (maybe half of it?)
    I gained a belief that Both these idiots were pretty far out there. What we really need is the Ancients wisdom on stone masonry.
     
  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    von Daniken was a con man, convicted of stealing funds from the Boy Scouts. You really need better sources.
     
  9. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    thusly why I believe he was an Idiot.
     
  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Sorry, I read hastily. My apologies. I really, really, really hate that man. I've had no end of battles over his bullshit.

    Tucking my fangs back in.
     
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]

    Light Pillars Over Inner Mongolia
    Image Credit & Copyright: N. D. Liao


    Explanation: What's happening across that field? Pictured here are not auroras but nearby light pillars, a phenomenon typically much closer. In most places on Earth, a lucky viewer can see a Sun pillar, a column of light appearing to extend up from the Sun caused by flat fluttering ice-crystals reflecting sunlight from the upper atmosphere. Usually, these ice crystals evaporate before reaching the ground. During freezing temperatures, however, flat fluttering ice crystals may form near the ground in a form of light snow sometimes known as a crystal fog. These ice crystals may then reflect ground lights in columns not unlike a Sun pillar. The featured image was taken last month across the Wulan Butong Grasslands in Inner Mongolia, China.
    Tomorrow's picture: star painters​
     
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  12. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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  13. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Then they'll put up signs, "No gwáilóu!"
     
  14. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]

    NGC 2170: Angel Nebula Abstract Art
    Image Credit & Copyright: David Moulton


    Explanation: Is this a painting or a photograph? In this celestial abstract art composed with a cosmic brush, dusty nebula NGC 2170, also known as the Angel Nebula, shines just above the image center. Reflecting the light of nearby hot stars, NGC 2170 is joined by other bluish reflection nebulae, a red emission region, many dark absorption nebulae, and a backdrop of colorful stars. Like the common household items that abstract painters often choose for their subjects, the clouds of gas, dust, and hot stars featured here are also commonly found in a setting like this one -- a massive, star-forming molecular cloud in the constellation of the Unicorn (Monoceros). The giant molecular cloud, Mon R2, is impressively close, estimated to be only 2,400 light-years or so away. At that distance, this canvas would be over 60 light-years across.
    Tomorrow's picture: star plane​
     
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  15. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    Until you see the Orion Nebula through a 8” telescope you can’t comprehend the magnitude of our insignificant significance.
     
  16. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Got a bit of time on Mt. Wilson. Friend of mine had relatives up there at the time.
     
  17. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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  18. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    When I was but a wee lad, high school, I read a story about an investigator who was trying to find out how people got along so well on the Moon. Turned out that they weren't but they had to work together to avoid the huge number of bullets that had be fired at the other parties during the only battle fought up there. Rounds fired in all directions and ORBITING the moon about five feet on the ground. Silly but completely believable from what I know about humans.
     
  19. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Careful mate...You're starting to sound like me. There is at least one moon movie that has different parties firing at each other from moon buggies...One party got away by driving over the lip of a huge crater and "launched" themselves down into it...With the low gravity it looked cool.
    Remember standard rifles and bullets WILL work on the moon, no modifications needed. (perhaps a guard or something for the fine powder environment).
    And also remember the "Space Force". You can bet the US has its own plans.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2024
  20. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    The short I mentioned I read in ~1965, one of a collection of "Let's screw up the Moon TOO!" stories.
     

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