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For Those Interested in Archaeology

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by GRW, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Dates all the way back to the Dream Time?
     
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  2. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Nice one!
     
  3. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Interesting, but finding it hard to share the excitement.
    'The world's first farmers have been traced to a 12,800 year-old Stone Age village in Syria using ancient dung - providing the earliest evidence of animals being reared to produce food for humans.
    Remnants of the animal dung were found in soil gathered during excavations in Abu Hureyra in present day Syria - now a prehistoric archaeological site in the Euphrates valley - during the 1970s.
    They were found to date back 12,800 years - suggesting people were tending sheep and possibly other livestock nearly 2,000 years earlier than previously thought.'
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11206549/Ancient-dung-reveals-evidence-worlds-farmers-12-800-year-old-Stone-Age-village.html

    On the other hand-
    'A prehistoric human skeleton that dates to the end of the last ice age was unearthed in a cave system in Mexico.
    Due to the distance from the cave's entrance, the skeleton could not have landed where it was found without modern diving equipment, so the researchers believe it dates to a time 8,000 years ago when rising sea levels flooded the caves.
    'We don’t know if the body was deposited there or if that was where this person died,' said cave-diving archaeologist Octavio Del Rio. '
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11212717/Human-SKELETON-seen-8-000-years-underwater-Mexican-cave.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2022
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    The second item reads less exciting when reported by other media.
     
  5. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    The skeleton? Yeah.
     
  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I've seen that in video, assuming it's was same girl. The cenote was dry for the first few thousand years.
     
  7. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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  8. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "Humans and Neanderthals may have coexisted in Europe for up to 2,900 years, giving them time to learn from and breed with each other, a new study finds.
    Using artifacts - tools and bones- from both groups found at sites in France and Spain, archaeologists determined humans were present about 42,500 years ago and the subspecies of archaic humans showed up about 40,000 years ago before disappearing some 1,000 years after.
    This means the two species lived alongside each other in the region for 1,400 to 2,900 years, marking the first evidence showing how long and where the pair mingled before subspecies of archaic humans went extinct."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11312381/Research-sheds-light-modern-humans-Neanderthals-existing-France.html
     
  9. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Surely DNA tells the story that indeed we did breed with them, but at the same time, not to the extent of ‘hybrids’ becoming wide spread…most of us have Neanderthal DNA but the small percentage ‘could’ suggest that inter breeding wasn’t rampant. However, there has been sufficient time since the end of Neanderthals to ‘re-strengthen’ the sapien genes…So it maybe that hybrids were in fact common…one could think of Eurasians today as a sub set of Asians and Europeans (a beautiful combination as it turns out) similar to the sub set created by humans and Neanderthals…If Asians and Europeans stopped ‘breeding’ with each other, then the Asian or European genes would re assert themselves over time and generations…see what I mean?
     
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  10. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Aye, that's actually a great point.
     
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    CAC, the HSN genes would have been diluted over time. Tough to tell what genes we get from them after thousands of years.

    On the gripping hand, my cousins don't seem to have an HSS genes at all.
     
  12. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Bit Biblical archaeology for a change.
    "Archaeologists have confirmed Biblical accounts of military campaigns against the Kingdoms of Israel and Judah by reconstructing the direction and/or intensity of the Earth's magnetic field recorded in burnt remnants found at 21 different sites across Israel.
    A team of researchers led by Tel-Aviv University used a collection of mud stones containing magnetic minerals that record magnetic fields when heated or burned.
    This is because some rocks and materials contain minerals that respond to the magnetic field like the needle of a compass, allowing researchers to determine if the city that once stood was burned to the ground.
    The study, however, also uses ancient inscriptions found at the sites and text from the Old Testament.
    Findings indicate that the army of Hazael, King of Aram-Damascus, was responsible for the destruction of several cities—Tel Rehov, Tel Zayit and Horvat Tevet, in addition to Gath of the Philistines, whose destruction is noted in the Hebrew Bible.
    At the same time, the study debunks the prevailing theory that Hazael was the conqueror who destroyed Tel Beth-Shean."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11353097/Biblical-stories-military-campaigns-against-kingdoms-Israel-Judah-proven.html
     
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  13. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    And again, right on my doorstep. :rolleyes::confused::mad:
    "An “exceptionally rare” golden artefact - thought to be around 1,300 years old and found near Blairdrummond – has been acquired by National Museums Scotland.
    The gold sword pommel, a decorative fitting which would have adorned the top of a sword hilt thousands of years ago, is the first of its kind to be discovered in Scotland.
    Archaeologists have stressed the discovery of the pommel in the Stirling countryside adds to its significance, giving it cultural, political and artistic links to northern Britain.
    Measuring 5.5cm wide and weighing 25g, the golden knob is valued at £30,000.
    Dr Alice Blackwell, senior curator of medieval archaeology and history at National Museums Scotland, said: “Goldwork from this period is virtually unknown from anywhere in the UK and we are delighted to secure the Stirling Pommel for Scotland’s national collections.
    “It’s a bit of a cultural, artistic melting pot, so it’s difficult to say where it fits and where it was made. It certainly has a lot of inheritance from Anglo-Saxon art, but it belongs to this period of the most amazing creative fusion where different types of styles and art and techniques for making things were all melted together to make something new.”
    www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/local-news/archaeologists-rave-exceptionally-rare-1300-28337043?fbclid=IwAR3DToIgIraIa-NgMdXR2CQSOdmNNtClsdpz0ZI4OYiJ5iccPD9xgyIhyks
     

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