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For Those Interested in Archaeology

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by GRW, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    A prehistoric thirst for craft beer
    Date: September 12, 2018
    Source: Elsevier
    Summary: Evidence suggests that stone mortars from Raqefet Cave, Israel, were used in brewing cereal-based beer millennia before the establishment of sedentary villages and cereal agriculture.

    (One for the Rogues...)
    A new study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports suggests beer brewing practices existed in the Eastern Mediterranean over five millennia before the earliest known evidence, discovered in northern China. In an archaeological collaboration project between Stanford University in the United States, and University of Haifa, Israel, archeologists analyzed three stone mortars from a 13,000-year old Natufian burial cave site in Israel. Their analysis confirmed that these mortars were used for brewing of wheat/barley, as well as for food storage.

    "Alcohol making and food storage were among the major technological innovations that eventually led to the development of civilizations in the world, and archaeological science is a powerful means to help reveal their origins and decode their contents," said Li Liu, PhD, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University, USA. "We are excited to have the opportunity to present our findings, which shed new light on a deeper history of human society."


    Continues...
     
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  2. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Well-Known Member Patron  

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    What, are you trying to say that was a significant discovery? I thought Bud Lite has more important. Our paper said a man was discovered in Utah that actually drank it!
     
  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I used to light buds.
     
  4. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Still do...
     
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  5. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Sadly, I have to keep legal. And lighting anything is bad for my lung-like things.

    Hmmm, cookies.
     
  6. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    What an absolute dream.
    "A metal detectorist has found what is thought to be the first Celtic chariot burial to be uncovered in Wales.
    The burial ritual was reserved for high-ranking chiefs who would be interred complete with their chariot, horses, tack and even weapons.
    Mike Smith believes his find may point to a huge undiscovered Iron Age settlement nearby.
    National Museum Wales describes the finds as "significant and exciting".
    The actual location in south Pembrokeshire is being kept secret while archaeologists prepare for a major dig next year.
    His first find in February came purely by chance as his favourite hunting ground was waterlogged, forcing him to switch to another field where he had not had much luck before.
    But this time he found what he first thought was a medieval brooch.
    He emailed a picture to an expert contact who said it was part of a Celtic horse harness dating from around 600 BC.
    Mr Smith, from Milford Haven, went straight back the following day."
    www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-46294000
     
  7. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Damn. Wanted it to be aliens with anti-gravity devices...
    "Stonehenge may have been built with the assistance of cows who helped carry the enormous rocks across the British Isles.
    It could help explain how the fabled bluestones managed to complete the journey from Wales to Wiltshire, where Stonehenge still sits today.
    Previous research has claimed the movement of glaciers deposited the huge slabs of rock 160 miles away from their original location.
    New research has found evidence of cattle being used by humans to pull and carry heavy loads for 8,000 years.
    Archaeologists at University College London discovered that the bones in the feet of Neolithic cattle demonstrated distinctive wear patterns, indicative of exploitation as 'animal engines'.
    Neolithic cattle in the Balkans were therefore being used for our purposes two millennia earlier than previously thought."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6491295/Stonehenge-built-COW-power-Cattle-lived-8-000-years-ago-used-animal-engines.html
     
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  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    At least it wasn't "Cows With Guns!"
     
  9. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Not actually from the "War Wolf" though.
    "An archaeological dig has unearthed new evidence of a three-day attack on Edinburgh Castle – on a site earmarked for a luxury hotel by Sir Richard Branson. Experts believe they have found a carved stone which would have been fired from a giant catapult during the pivotal siege in 1296. It led to Edward I seizing control of the medieval fortress, plundering its treasures and shipping them to London, and the castle being held under English rule for 18 years. Archaeologists made the discovery at the site of the proposed new Virgin Hotel, which is earmarked for a large swathe of Edinburgh’s Old Town.
    cuppa a little extra. Sponsored by eBay The dig, which has been ongoing in the Cowgate since May, has also unearthed remains of some of the earliest homes to be built in the city centre, which are believed to date back to the 12th century, along with prehistoric bones. The stone ball is believed to have been fired by a trebuchet – the powerful catapult used by Edward I’s forces to lay siege to Edinburgh and Stirling castles. It is thought the “Warwolf” deployed in the Stirling siege, and featured in one of the most spectacular scenes in the new Robert the Bruce netflix film Outlaw King – was the biggest trebuchet made anywhere in the world."
    www.edinburghnews.scotsman.com/news/entertainment/catapult-ball-fired-at-edinburgh-castle-in-13th-century-siege-discovered-in-hotel-site-dig-1-4849752
     
  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Is Edinburgh anywhere near Edinborough?
     
  11. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    There is a burro in Edinburgh?
     
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  12. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Is Edinburgh anywhere near Edinborough?

    No, the latter's in Glasgow...
     
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  13. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Good start to the year!
    "In the ice age, the inhabitants of today`s Europe were hunting mammoths with javelins. The first direct evidence of this is a fragment of a 25,000 years old flint head discovered in Kraków, stuck in a mammoth rib.
    The find comes from one of the largest clusters of mammoth bones in Europe, which is located in the area of today`s V. Hofman street, near the Kościuszko Mound in Kraków. As a result of many years of excavations, archaeologists have discovered the remains of at least 110 mammoths from approx. 25,000 years ago.
    Wojtal reminds that the scientific community has been discussing for years how our ancestors killed mammoths. According to some researchers, these animals were killed by trickery - chasing them to the pits or towards bluffs, from which they would fall. Others say that people focused on weaker or sick animals. Some think that mammoths were hunted.
    "We finally have a "smoking gun", the first direct evidence of how these animals were hunted" - notes the archaeozoologist.
    So far, similar finds are known only from two Siberian sites.
    The bone with the flint blade was discovered already in 2002. Since bone damage is small, it was only discovered in February 2018 during detailed archaeozoological analyses. During this research, each of tens of thousands of bone fragments is carefully inspected.
    The blade fragment preserved in the bone is only 7 mm long. Scientists believe that it is a flint tip broken off at the moment of driving a spear into the body of a mammoth."
    Kraków/ The first evidence in Europe that man was hunting mammoths discovered
     
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  14. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    So, high-powered rifles with hollow point ammo have been ruled out at last?
     
  15. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    "Fraid so, old boy. :pipesmoke:
     
  16. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    [Grudgingly cancels time machine project.]
     
  17. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Doesn't sound like they took the mammoth but ran off...if it was killed the bones would be picked clean and in a heap...sounds like it took off and died somewhere...
     
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  18. WILD DUKW

    WILD DUKW Active Member

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    And it is a good thing you did..... Using hollow points on even one of those little bitty modern elephants is a good way to become a pancake. :)
     
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  19. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Grumpy mammoth would make me skedaddle.
     
  20. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    My thoughts also...you get close enough to stab or thrust a spear in a modern elephant and it would seriously mess with you...off the top of my head the strategy other than cliff falls is to either trip it continually or attack its knee joints with spears so it can’t walk then throw big rocks at it...or come behind with some sort of hammer or axe...
     

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