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For Those Interested in Archaeology

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by GRW, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    New artifacts suggest people arrived in North America earlier than previously thought
    Date: August 30, 2019
    Source: Oregon State University
    Summary: Stone tools and other artifacts unearthed from an archeological dig at the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho suggest that people lived in the area 16,000 years ago, more than a thousand years earlier than scientists previously thought.

    "
    Stone tools and other artifacts unearthed from an archeological dig at the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho suggest that people lived in the area 16,000 years ago, more than a thousand years earlier than scientists previously thought.

    The artifacts would be considered among the earliest evidence of people in North America.

    The findings, published today in Science, add weight to the hypothesis that initial human migration to the Americas followed a Pacific coastal route rather than through the opening of an inland ice-free corridor, said Loren Davis, a professor of anthropology at Oregon State University and the study's lead author.

    "The Cooper's Ferry site is located along the Salmon River, which is a tributary of the larger Columbia River basin. Early peoples moving south along the Pacific coast would have encountered the Columbia River as the first place below the glaciers where they could easily walk and paddle in to North America," Davis said. "Essentially, the Columbia River corridor was the first off-ramp of a Pacific coast migration route.

    "The timing and position of the Cooper's Ferry site is consistent with and most easily explained as the result of an early Pacific coastal migration."
    "

    Continues at site.
     
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  2. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    That's a great find.
     
  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    The parent site has regular goodies.
     
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  4. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    hmm, wonder where those folks came from...
    a lot of peoples around these parts claim the land as theirs...like they were always here.

    I visited coopers ferry as a young lad. twas beautiful.
     
  5. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    The sea level was lower, so they could have followed the coast from Asia easily enough. The melting glaciers must have drowned a huge trove of relics. England had a land bridge to Europe back then, many villages may lie at the bottom of the channel.
     
  6. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    I remember they found a camp site on the seabed about six miles off Berwick on Tweed about 15 years ago. Might have been about 8000 years old, but can't find a link.
     
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  7. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Yeah, that's the kind of thing I was talking about.
     
  8. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "What could turn out to be one of Scotland's largest Pictish burial grounds is being excavated on the Black Isle in the Highlands.
    Archaeologists have confirmed the presence of a number of barrows, or burial mounds, near Muir of Ord.
    Enclosures ranging in size from about 8m (26ft) to more than 40m (131ft) across have also been uncovered.
    Archaeologists said the possible Pictish barrow cemetery could be about 1,400 years old.
    They have also found features on the site that could date much further back into the prehistoric period.
    Tarradale Through Time, a project of the North of Scotland Archaeological Society, is excavating the site.
    The project has previously found a harpoon or spear along with axes made by hunter-gatherers in the Highlands 6,000 years ago."
    www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-49661125
     
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  9. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Two for the price of one.
    "New evidence has surfaced suggesting that the British Isles had developed maritime trade routes with the rest of the world as early as the Bronze Age.
    Researchers at Heidelburg University in Germany have discovered that 3000-year-old tin ingots found in Israel are actually from Cornwall and Devon.
    The ingots, which date back to around 1,300 BC, were also found at archaeological sites in Turkey and Greece.
    The findings are proof that complex and far-reaching trade routes must have existed between Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean as far back as the Bronze Age.
    Raw materials like tin as well as amber, glass, and copper were highly appreciated and the driving forces of this early international trade network.
    Dr Ernst Pernicka, a retired professor from Heidelberg University, said: 'Bronze was used to make weapons, jewellery, and all types of daily objects, justifiably bequeathing its name to an entire epoch.
    'The origin of tin has long been an enigma in archaeological research. Tin objects and deposits are rare in Europe and Asia.'
    'The Eastern Mediterranean region, where some of the objects we studied originated, had practically none of its own deposits, so the raw material in this region must have been imported.'"
    www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7466289/3-000-year-old-tin-ingots-Cornwall-Israel-reveal-islands-ancient-trade-routes.html

    "A new species of pterodactyl the size of a small plane has been discovered in Canada.
    And scientists have called it Cryodrakon boreas, or Frozen Dragon of the North.
    Researchers who unearthed the partial Game of Thrones-like skeleton in Dinosaur Provincial Park in southern Alberta realised it was like no other.
    They believe that because of its muscular shape it was a ground hunter who used flight to burst away from danger or to seize its prey.
    It is rare to find so many bones from a single bird and the vertebrae, cervical and leg bones have been studied in the US, Canada and the UK.
    Michael Habib, assistant professor of Integrative Anatomical Sciences at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California and research associate at the Dinosaur Institute of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County said this particular specimen was well preserved."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7466251/Fossil-discovery-pterosaur-Cryodrakon-boreas-flew-North-America-75-million-years-ago.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  10. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Sure I saw this a few weeks ago, but don't seem to have posted it. I know it ain't archaeology, but...
    "A team of experts led by Douwe van Hinsbergen, a professor of global tectonics and paleogeography at Utrecht University, has revealed the secret history of a great lost land mass which they have dubbed Greater Adria. They believe a fragment the size of present-day Greenland broke loose from ancient supercontinent Gondwanaland more than 200 million years and slowly drifted north.
    It eventually collided with Europe around 70 million years ago and was forced deep underground beneath the northern Mediterranean.
    Prof van Hinsbergen said a 60-mile thick section of the original continent still remains buried beneath the ocean while its surface crust was scraped off in the ultra slow-motion collision which resulted mountain ranges such as such as the Alps, the Apennines, and the Taurus range being formed.
    He said: “The only remaining part of this continent is a strip that runs from Turin via the Adriatic Sea to the heel of the boot that forms Italy.”
    www.express.co.uk/news/world/1179762/europe-news-lost-continent-greater-adria-Douwe-van-Hinsbergen
     
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Ha! Atlantis found!
     
  12. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Don't give them ideas, FGS.:eek::rolleyes::(
     
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  13. Emzel

    Emzel New Member

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    Thanks GRW for the Scotland piece. I travel to Edinburgh regularly so any tidbit of Scottish info is welcome.
     
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  14. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    No worries. Should be quite a few in this thread.
    If the links don't work, try this-
    www.archaeologica.org/NewsPage.htm

    Here's one I just found-
    "Plans have been unveiled for a national memorial to all those condemned as witches in Scotland during the 16th to 18th Centuries.
    The proposal includes using the Beamer Rock beacon which was removed from the Firth of Forth in 2011 to make way for the Queensferry Crossing.
    It would be rebuilt on the coast at The Ness in Torryburn in Fife.
    This is the site where Lilias Adie was buried after being forced to confess she was a witch.
    It would be an information point for the history behind the persecutions.
    The public will be able to view the plans at Torryburn and Newmills Community Centre on 26 September.
    Lilias Adie was a Torryburn woman who died of maltreatment in custody in 1704 as an accused witch.
    Her grave, 100 metres into the intertidal zone on the foreshore at Torryburn, was opened by curio hunters, who then sold her skull in 1852.
    Modern day archaeologists and historians found her grave, which has a huge slab on top, in 2014."
    www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edin...s/scotland&link_location=live-reporting-story
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2019
  15. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Egbert the Extravagant! And his mate- Cuthbert the Coy.
    "Part of a Viking-age treasure hoard unearthed in Galloway belonged to a man named Egbert, research has concluded.
    Examination of Anglo-Saxon runic inscriptions on silver arm-rings has revealed the name Ecgbeorht.
    Dr Adrian Maldonado said it was "really exciting" to find a message left behind by someone who had deposited part of the hoard 1,100 years ago.
    The National Museums Scotland research fellow said further study might help find out more about the owner.
    The Galloway hoard was uncovered by a metal detectorist in south west Scotland in 2014.
    It was acquired by National Museums Scotland three years later.
    "We don't know any more about Egbert than his name right now but there's something really tantalising about connecting the Galloway hoard with a named person," said Dr Maldonado.
    "Egbert is a common Anglo-Saxon name, and with more research on the rest of the contents of the hoard, we will be able to narrow down its dating and suggest some candidates from the historical record.""
    www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-south-scotland-49905258
     
  16. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I'm currently slow marching through 20+ seasons of "Time Team" on Youtube.
     
  17. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Another jammy sod...
    "A metal detectorist is celebrating the find of a lifetime after discovering a beautiful 4,000-year-old gold torc worth tens of thousands of pounds.
    Billy Vaughan, 54, was stunned when he unearthed the gleaming 22 carat gold band in a remote field near his home town of Whitehaven, Cumbria.
    The Bronze Age piece of twisted jewellery was nestled 5ins below the surface.
    Mr Vaughan at first thought it was a piece of climbing equipment and it wasn't until he sent a photo of it to a fellow detectorist that he identified it as a torc.
    He also showed it to a jeweller who said its weight of 11oz of pure gold alone had a market value of £11,000.
    With the added historical significance the torc is estimated to be worth considerably more than this sum."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7546465/Four-thousand-year-old-Bronze-Age-gold-necklace-thats-worth-11k-Cumbria.html
     
  18. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Do you watch "Time Team"? Twenty seasons on Youtube.
     
  19. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Now and again, if I remember. Managed to see most of them first time round, then concentrated on the specials I missed.
    Should really start again from scratch, just to refresh my memory.
    Don't know if it'll let you on Stateside, but you can also get it on the C4 iplayer-
    Time Team - All 4
     
  20. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Theres a British and American version isn't there?
     

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