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For Those Interested in Archaeology

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by GRW, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    I'm safe now, got two ex-dragons wives.:D:p
     
  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Revolutionary new method for dating pottery sheds new light on prehistoric past
    Date: April 8, 2020
    Source: University of Bristol
    Summary: A team has developed a new method to date archaeological pottery using fat residues remaining in the pot wall from cooking. The method means prehistoric pottery can be dated with remarkable accuracy, sometimes to the window of a human life span. Pottery found in Shoreditch, London proven to be 5,500 years old and shows the vibrant urban area was once used by established farmers who ate cow, sheep and goat dairy products as a central part of their diet.

    Continues at site.
     
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  3. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    *bumped* for an update-
    "Scotland’s earliest line is to be commemorated as it approaches its 300th anniversary, along with plans to excavate a short stretch.
    The Tranent to Cockenzie Waggonway in East Lothian was built on wooden rails to haul coal to power coastal salt works – the country’s biggest industry of the time.
    Opened in 1722, it used horses and gravity to bring the coal north from the mines. Now a footpath, excavations last year revealed imprints of the wooden rails and a cobbled horse path between them, a metre beneath the surface.
    It was named as one of Scotland’s top five archaeological finds of 2019 by Dig It Scotland, the country’s archaeological hub.
    There are now plans to open up a 10m-15m stretch to better understand how it was built.
    The waggonway’s history is intertwined with the Jacobites, with the line built on estates seized from supporters of the Old Pretender, Bonnie Prince Charlie’s father James Edward Stuart, after the failed rising of 1715.
    Thirty years later, his son, the Young Pretender, led Jacobite forces to victory over an army loyal to King George II at the Battle of Prestonpans in 1745, part of which was fought over the waggonway."
    www.edinburghnews.scotsman.com/heritage-and-retro/heritage/scotlands-earliest-railway-so-old-jacobite-battle-was-fought-over-it-2790437
     
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  4. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

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    Only thing I dug up was a 1935 quarter I discovered with a metal detector...but I find this thread more interesting all the time...especially when someone discovers buried Roman or Viking treasures in some field.
     
  5. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    It's happened twice now in fields practically on my doorstep. Maybe I need a new hobby.o_O
     
  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I found a Mason jar in an old house that was full of money. Long forgotten evidently, the most recent minting was 1888, and this was 1968. Probably somebody's life savings that outlived them.
     
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  7. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Bet it would still have been worth a fair amount.
     
  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Mostly pennies, nickels and dimes. But I donated the paper money to the the Indiana State Historical Agency and they researched the property and narrowed the candidates down to a lady who was one of the first female doctors in the state. She never married and went to India when she was in her fifties to do charity work. She had no living relatives when she died. Nice to know I didn't cheat anybody out of any inheritance. And I made a necklace out of the only gold double eagle.
     
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  9. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Logical, since some of these places are too big to have just been forts-
    "A hillfort in Aberdeenshire is one of the largest ancient settlements ever discovered in Scotland, researchers have said.
    University of Aberdeen archaeologists say 4,000 people may have lived in more than 800 huts perched high on the Tap O' Noth near Rhynie.
    Many had thought it dated from the Bronze or Iron Age.
    The team said carbon dating suggested it was likely to be Pictish, dating back as far as the third century AD.
    They believe at its height it may have rivalled the largest known post-Roman settlements in Europe.
    Archaeologists from the university have conducted extensive fieldwork in the surrounding area since 2011.
    Prof Gordon Noble, who led the research, described the discovery that activity at the site extended into the Pictish period as the most surprising of his career."
    www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-52660032?fbclid=IwAR18cJlp3hSA2E4QQWW7crhSIQES8wA1IMoYHsEqPKg94X7aPRw__77mrJY
     
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  10. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "For more than 200 years Mingary Castle off the coast of Scotland lay ruined and abandoned.
    The impressive fortress is nestled on the top of a rocky cliff, where its windows gaze out to sea.
    Dating back as far as the 13th century, the castle was clearly once important due to its impressive vantage point - but was abandoned two centuries ago.
    Since 2013, the site and castle have been designated as historically important and work is now ongoing to preserve and restore the impressive building.
    But hidden within its walls is a bizarre room, closed to the outside world more than 500 years ago.
    And when it was finally opened six years ago, historians made a disturbing discovery - bones.
    Those renovating the castle came across the tiny room, which measures just 6 feet across and is only 6 feet high, entirely by accident.
    Builders had discovered a passageway in the north wall of the imposing building, which is close to the village of Kilchoan on Scotland's Ardnamurchan peninsula.
    It was as they started excavating that they came across the chamber - and historians are at a loss as to what it was used for.
    But the room, which is not believed to have been touched since the 16th century, did contain fragments of bone.
    Jon Haylett, a local historian with the Mingary Castle Trust, believes the room will have been sealed off when the walls had to be filled in to strengthen them against cannon fire."
    www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/secret-bone-filled-room-opened-22023149
     
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