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From my Navy days

Discussion in 'Photo Gallery Support' started by T. A. Gardner, Jul 4, 2010.

  1. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    Here are a few from my Navy days:

    The first is one of the projects I managed with the first produciton batch. That was just short of a $1 million dollar job and I saved the Navy nearly $500,000 on that one. The second is at my retirement. Chief Channel (left) and Senior Chief Scott (right) are behind me. Chief Channel retired with me.
    The last is me in the shop doing what needed getting done.
     

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  2. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

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    Nice pictures T.A., What were your assignments? If you can divulge that info. Those aren't 'lobster' traps in the first photo right?
     
  3. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    That particular picture shows the shore power cable racks I was building for NavSta San Diego PWC Department. They are essentially glorified pallets for holding the cables that power the ships when in port. I had to redesign them from the sketches I initially received.
    They cost $1100 each for me to produce versus $3300 from civilian bids. Shipping was $100 apiece.

    The reason they had to be made was California's enviromental laws prohibited any contamination of the stormwater system on base by industrial products. Apparently the old method of piling the cables on a wooden pallet and / or dragging them to the ship was letting little bits of rubber from the jackets get in the storm sewers.
    Of course, what I couldn't figure out was if that were the case why were they letting cars drive around the base?.....
    Anyway, the racks did have several advantages. They allowed you to stack one ship's worth of cables in a single rack. The racks had side panels so you could mark information about what was in the rack on it. A single driver and forklift could haul all the cables for a ship in a single load reducing the time and manpower necessary to deliver or remove cables from the pier. They also minimized physical damage to the cables both in storage and transit.
     
  4. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large Patron  

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    Well I still think you're a pretty good guy and smart, well read individual even if you were a squid!:D

    Just kidding, nice pics.
     
  5. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large Patron  

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    Just realized how this sounded, i was kidding about...
    I was sincere about this part....
    I'm leaving now to go wash the taste of foot out of my mouth, dooh!
     
  6. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    Thats very cool...........too bad the military doesn't operate like that anymore.
     
  7. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

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    I've never understood the "outsourcing" mentality? Those who know the needs and "what for's" are usually the last to be consulted. Great job TA.
     

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