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Glenn E. Duncan

Discussion in 'Art of War' started by dibujosconhistoria, Jul 3, 2017.

  1. dibujosconhistoria

    dibujosconhistoria Active Member

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    Hi everyone! My latest drawing completed (Commission from a regular client). Title: Glenn E Duncan and his “Dove of peace”. I hope you like it. Regards.

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    Framed. ​

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    Pregress​

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    Details.​
     
  2. dibujosconhistoria

    dibujosconhistoria Active Member

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    Glenn E Duncan:
    Glenn E Duncan joined the 353rd Fighter Group in March 1943 as Group Executive Officer. He claimed 19 victories until he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and commander of the Group in November 1943. He was shot down during a strafing mission on 7 July 1944 and evaded capture, working with the Dutch underground before being liberated by the Allied 10 months later. He returned to the 353rd and resumed command in April 1945.
     
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  3. DevJJ

    DevJJ New Member

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    You have written quite a bit about Glenn Duncan and I would like to supplement your drawing with a short essay with a biography, I am sure many will be interested to learn more about him. Born April 19, 1918 in Bering, Texas, Glenn Duncan was one of the relatively few experienced pilots of the United States Air Force who joined the 353rd Fighter Group when it was formed at the end of 1942. Armed with Thunderbolts, they followed the 56th and 78th groups to Europe, arriving in the UK in June 1943. At the moment, Duncan was an Exec group. He flew several missions from 78th this summer.
    September 23, 1943, he won his first victory, the FW-190 over Nantes. On November 11, during frequent escort missions, he claimed two German fighters, and on December 20 he became an ace with his fifth victory. In November, he became a colonel and took command of the 353rd.
    Dove of Peace VII headed for the deck and opened all the eighty fifties, firing He-111 bombers on a field at Wesendorf in western Germany. It was a month after D-Day, July 7, 1944, and Colonel Glenn Duncan led his group, the 353rd, to distract from the bombers. When he roared over the airfield, German anti-aircraft gunners aimed their deadly 88-mm anti-aircraft guns at P-47 lightning. They found the range and got into his plane on the oil line, which undoubtedly caused great damage to a large fighter, as his radial machine Pratt and Whitney soon overheated. Definitely, on the net, you find more information, as for me, I'm going to share it on my blog too.
     
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