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Heinrich Severloh The beast of Omaha

Discussion in 'Omaha Beach' started by Jim, Feb 14, 2012.

  1. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    Heinrich Severloh took 40 years to begin to process what happened to him on Omaha Beach. He had taken up a concealed position on the eastern side of the beach along with 30 other German soldiers, and he recalls watching the horizon turn black with dozens of ships and landing craft racing for the shore. His commanding officer, Lt. Bernhard Frerking, had told him not to open fire until the enemy reached knee-deep level, where he could get a full view.

    "What came to mind was, 'Dear God, why have you abandoned me?' " he recalled. "I wasn't afraid. My only thought was, 'How can I get away from here?'"

    But rather than run, Severloh slipped the first belt of ammunition into his MG-42 machine gun and opened fire. He could see men spinning, bleeding and crashing into the surf, while others ripped off their heavy packs, threw away their carbines and raced for the shore. But there was little shelter there. Severloh said he would occasionally put down the machine gun and use his carbine to pick off individual men huddled on the beach. He is still haunted by a soldier who was loading his rifle when Severloh took aim at his chest. The bullet went high and hit the man in the forehead.

    Heinrich Severloh The beast of Omaha

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    "The helmet fell and rolled over in the sand," Severloh said. "Every time I close my eyes, I can see it."

    Severloh said he was the last man firing from his position. By mid-afternoon, his right shoulder was swollen and his slender fingers were numb from constant firing. When a U.S. destroyer pinpointed his position and began to shell it, he fled to the nearby village of Colleville-Sur-Mer, where he was captured that evening.

    In Severloh's telling of D-Day, there are few heroes and several surprises. The German occupiers had warm relations with their French farm hosts before the invasion, he contends. Lt. Frerking, who died on D-Day, was an honorable man who spoke fluent French and once gave one of his men 10 days' punishment for failing to help an elderly French woman with her shopping bags, Severloh said. The U.S. invaders slaughtered farm animals and soldiers, he said, yet that evening he and his ravenous U.S. captors shared a baguette.

    Severloh said he first told his tale to an inquisitive correspondent for ABC News during the 40th anniversary of D-Day in 1984. But the real breakthrough came when an amateur war historian named Helmut Konrad von Keusgen tracked Severloh down. Von Keusgen, a former scuba diver and graphic artist, said he had heard from U.S. veterans about the machine gunner they called the "Beast of Omaha Beach" because he had mowed down hundreds of GIs that day. Severloh confessed he was that gunner. Von Keusgen ghost-wrote Severloh's memoirs, published in 2000, and still visits him regularly.

    The two men contend that Severloh might have shot more than 2,000 GIs. That's an impossible figure, according to German and American historians, who say that although the numbers are far from exact, estimates are that about 2,500 Americans were killed or wounded by the 30 German soldiers on the beach.

    "My guess is yes, he helped kill or wound hundreds, but how many hundreds would be hard to say," Roger Cirillo, a military historian at the Association of the U.S. Army in Arlington, wrote in an e-mail. He added: "Omaha is like Pickett's Charge. The story has gotten better with age, though no one doubts it was a horror show. Men on both sides were brave beyond reason, and this is the sole truth of the story."

    Hein Severloh said he takes no pride in what he did, but telling his tale has given him a sense of relief.

    "I have thought about it every single day that God gave to me," he said. Now, he said, "the pressure is gone."

    Heinrich Severloh The beast of Omaha
     
  2. Cabel1960

    Cabel1960 recruit

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    Great read Jim, 40 years before he began to share this story. The man's head must have been in turmoil. Its hard to put yourself in this position, after all the only thing he is guilty of is fighting for his country. :wtf:

    Had this been a soldier fighting for the Allies, i am sure it would not have been silent for 40 years. :der:
     
  3. worldwarIIstories

    worldwarIIstories recruit

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    Jim, really enjoyed your article on Severloh.....I think he wrote a book about his Normandy ezxperiance, but I haven't been able to find a copy.

    Dick Avery
     
  4. the_diego

    the_diego Member

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    He just found himself in a well-established condition know as the-right-place-at-the-right-time: several thousand enemy soldiers helpless on the beach, he with an mg-42 and several thousand rounds of ammo.
     
  5. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    As well as several other German machinegunners...Not to mention the German mortarmen and artillerymen. Yet, the focus somehow remains on Severloh.
     
  6. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

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    I grew up next to a German Omaha veteran. I was too you to realise what he had been through and never asked him to tell his story. I remembe rhim telling that his job wasa cemetary warden in Normandy because he was the last survivor of his squad and it was his way to stay with his comrades.
     
  7. Sheldrake

    Sheldrake Member

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    This is tired old news with the "journalist" recycling old canards without any critical comment, such as the claim that Serverloh "might have shot 2,000 US soldiers" - i.e almost every US casualty on OMAHA beach.

    This is not true.Serverloh's account appears in "The invasion their coming" by former Nazi war correspondent Paul Carell published in 1962. Serverloh is an old man and Von Keusingen wants to promote his book and artwork.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
  8. harolds

    harolds Member

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    I count about 9 resistance nests fronting Omaha Beach. Nest 62 (Severloh's) was the largest of these. Even so, it is doubtful that even this one nest could be responsible for the great majority of the American casualties. What then were all the other resistance nests doing-having a coffee break? Severloh was a prime example of soldiers of every army, who, scared out of their minds, did their duty as they saw it despite their fear. However, I could believe that he and his MG accounted for a couple of hundred American casualties. Even at that, it would put him as one of the more successful machine gunners of the war!
     
  9. Sheldrake

    Sheldrake Member

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    Agreed. Nor has anyone has mentioned the contribution made by Serveloh's commander, who did not survive. The Artillelry of 352nd Infantry Division had not been detected or targeted by allied aircraft or naval gunfire. They expended most of their ammunition by noon. Much of this would have been behind the sea wall where man y assault troops would have taken shelter. Artillery and mortars caused many of the casualties - its the logic which supported Cota's call to get off the beach.
     

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