Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Help and advice sought on ww2 uniform

Discussion in 'Uniforms, Personal Gear (Kit) and Accessories' started by James777, Oct 18, 2008.

  1. James777

    James777 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2008
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    10
    Yep..i thought it was making sense too..up until a buddy on line who knows a lot more than i do pointed out Coastal artillary did not serve in the European theatre.
    The service record summary and ribbons put him in europe..so why the coastal artillary device?
    On the arm is also the US 1st Army patch,is there a connection there with the coastal artillary ?
    Im hoping someone can read that service summary and clear this up for me , he sure served with more than one outfit.
     
  2. JCFalkenbergIII

    JCFalkenbergIII Expert

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,480
    Likes Received:
    425
    Thats why I found it interesting. IIRC there were no CA units in Europe unless the AAA units wore the same insignia since the AAA Command was part of the CA .
     
  3. James777

    James777 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2008
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    10
    Im off to find out for sure , i think you cracked it :)
     
    GPRegt likes this.
  4. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2000
    Messages:
    25,883
    Likes Received:
    855
    Hi James, he certainly does sound like a great person to know. I've been lucky over the years to know a few Gents who werre a big part of WWII History. Living not too terribly far from me-was BrigGen David Lee "Tex" Hill-of Flying Tigers fame. I had conversations with him and he certainly was a cool character-cool in a good way ;-))

    I like you IAB-looks like it's an IAB Silver one. Also, nice cased 25 year service award. I had one but gave it to a good friend of mine in ENgland.

    Take care--C
     
  5. James777

    James777 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2008
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    10
    I guess they are getting thin on the ground these days ,all the more reason for ensuring its kept together.Im currently doing a bit of a search in upstate NY to see if there isnt somewhere in his hometown i might be able to donate the items to.
    Ive quickly come to realise these are one of a kind items , im told the pass to the tribunal just isnt ever seen,never appears.
    It really hit home when i looked at the reverse of the DI.

    The two German items i find interesting , i can understand a soldier obtaining the infantry badge , many ways that might occur.Its the silver cross in the box i cant get my head around..its the fact its still in the box and other than a little dingy the box shows no sign of weakness or buckled edges.
    Where would one get such an item still in its box as a guard at Nuremberg ?
    Im only assuming it became his property at that time as it was kept with the ike jacket,i could be wrong easily but letting my imagination run for a minute i wonder if any of the prisoners might have qualified for such an award,25 years service is a long time.
    Ive read first hand accounts from guards writing various books and newspaper interviews etc that things were given and traded to the guards for small favors.
    Goering for example gave his pen and watch away , some think this somehow set in motion his access to the previously stashed cyinide.

    Im probably way off base but i just cant figure where else you would come across something like that still in the presentation box.
    Thats research for another day , and this day is done , g'night guys
     
  6. drewthefan123

    drewthefan123 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2008
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    9
    Hello James,

    I got your message:


    Thats some collection you have there , a veritable museum.When you have a minute take a look at the thread i started about the ww2 uniform.Theres still a few unanswered questions and id reckon you'll have the knowledge, gotta have loads of experience with militaria to have a collection like that.
    regards , james

    so I have spent 45 min reading (I may have missed some info), and when seeing the markings, I knew before the others told you. But anyways, it seems you still have a few main questions:

    Why an Artillery man as a Guard?

    Simply, the war was over, many of the men were going home. So the US army may have decided to use soldier that hadn't have much action in the front. So they wouldn't get an urge to Kill one of them cause they were German... or simply due to him wanting a Transfer, there were places open as a guard and he 'got the job'.

    The service record summary and ribbons put him in europe..so why the coastal artillary device?

    Simply, they had coastal artillary in Europe just to defend from enemy Planes and U-boats. Also as an outpost incase of a 'sudden' German sea-air battle, which at the time seemed possible to the average soldier. After all, they can't see the future.

    On the arm is also the US 1st Army patch,is there a connection there with the coastal artillary ?

    In a army, they have several branches and devisions for several purposes. Such as I mentioned from earlier, he may have been in a reenforcement outpost that had him be apart of a coastal artillry.

    Where would one get such an item still in its box as a guard at Nuremberg ?

    It is very common for a service Medal like that to still have its case. You see, it may have belonged to a family or soldier after the war that needed money and/or food. So Americans/British were looking for "WAR-TROPIES" and they had the goods, and the Germans had the 'Trophies'... eathier that, or he bought it at a military show (I may be wrong there).

    Anyways, I hope that helped. If these were not the question anwsers you were wanting, please correct me then. I am shooting from the hip here cause I do not know all the info here. Just using my common sense... ;)
     
    James777 likes this.
  7. James777

    James777 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2008
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    10
    Well there it is : ) the last missing link , im very grateful Drew.Ive had too many sleepless nights lately trying to nail that one.
    The Coast Artillary were in Europe , i believe JCFaulkenerlll had it near the mark suggesting the CA might have been part of AAA in Europe.
    Its all been very confusing and mindblowing at the same time , i can put it to rest now as i know about everything there is to know about it now.Thanks to everybody who participated , i do appreciate all the help and kind words.
    Ive had little luck in finding a museum that doesnt tell me i should be calling the WW2 museum in DC.
    Im told there it might or might not get displayed,theres every chance it doesnt.
    Im not overly happy about that so i'll put it away carefully until i find the right place.
     
  8. James777

    James777 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2008
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    10
    Ive deleted the pictures guys as it never did sit awfully well with me posting Herbs stuff on the internet, if i hadnt i would not have learned what it all meant so its a danged if i do and danged if i dont thing.
    I am very grateful to all who participated in the thread.I do know you were pleased to see the items but its time the pics were down.Thanks again guys
     
  9. JCFalkenbergIII

    JCFalkenbergIII Expert

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,480
    Likes Received:
    425
    There would have been no need for the CA to have been in Europe except for the AAA Command units That was part of the CA . And certainly not for coastal defence or protection against U-boats. And even then the AAA units were needed less and less as the war went on.
     
  10. James777

    James777 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2008
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    10
    They had to have been there as the collar device tells us so , the service summary matches the ribbons and 3 hash marks.
    I guess on paper they were not there but the reality is they were.I looked for many hours and i can't place them there anywhere but the service summary tells it in black and white.
    For sure they were part of the AAA group , Drews explanation of thier use in Europe makes total sense.
    So for our purposes here we can take it as the CA were there on Omaha beach or at least landed there in 44.
    Jersey Isles is mentioned on the summary and we all know that was occupied by the Germans at some point , the CA there makes sense.
    Battle of the bulge , Siegried line , Roer crossing , Remogen,Defese of FUSA.
    All mentioned in the service summary.Hardly a place for the C.A yet they were there.
    Genuine relics dont mislead , he was there and apparantly wearing the C.A device.
    AAA gets mentioned 4 times towards the end of the summary so ive little doubt your correct in thinking the C.A were in Europe as part of the AAA groups.
    Im indebted to both you and Drew and thank you both.
     
  11. JCFalkenbergIII

    JCFalkenbergIII Expert

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,480
    Likes Received:
    425
  12. James777

    James777 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2008
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    10
    Thats pretty cool , thanks JCFlll , it sure was a long and interesting road getting to where we are with the answer,not perfect but touching distance,as close as i guess we can expect to get.
     
  13. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2000
    Messages:
    25,883
    Likes Received:
    855
    Hi James, you got that right. Many of the WWII Vets I knew and were good friends with, are no longer here. I knew many US, German and a few British Vets-oh and one Russian Vet-who lived here locally and really was a rascal. Anyway, more fo these Gents are now gone. It almost seems like everytime I turn around-another one I know is gone ;-((

    Anyway, I am glad you will be keeping this stuff together-as it should be. About 2 or so years ago, I was sent an email from some auction house in Arizona or somewhere-and they were actually offering my US General Hoyt Vander-something or others entire collection of items. I had to laugh because I couldn't come up with the $2 MILLION dollars they wanted. Then next I heard-the SOBs were goinng to sell items off piece meal. I sent them several emails that went unanswered and said I did know two local collecvtors with the money at hand-who would buy the entire collection and pay what they wanted for it. Those sorry SOBs broke up that collection anyway-just to make a few extra bucks. I was raging mad then and I still am peeved as hell about it.
     
  14. James777

    James777 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2008
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    10
    Yeah , when you figure they were boys when they went abroad i guess average age of the last of them must be around low 80's.
    Officers and NCO's would be older and first to go i guess , younger enlisted men en masse are now all of a great age.

    The worlds changing my friend and soon will be a sorrier place without them.As they go so do our sense of values and morals ive observed,not neccessarily mine or yours but the world in general.

    Im a little confused with the story about the auction house ?They had your collection and wanted money...dunno , i got lost there somewhere.
     
  15. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2000
    Messages:
    25,883
    Likes Received:
    855
    Hi James, you can say all of that again. I'm regretting the loss of all of the Vets I know-especially Remy Schrijnen, Hans Goebeler, Hans ""Wagemuller"' Capt Richard Wallace Annand V.C, and too many others. I didn't have as much time in knowing these Gents when they were alive-as I would have liked but, I count my blessings that I was allowed the time I did have knowing them.

    The deal about that auctionhouse was that they were selling an American high-ranking General of WWII's personal possessions-I THINK for his family. As I have at times-participated in Militaria auctions and have managed to snag a few items-I guess I was on a list of sorts-of people who participated in auctions and I was sent an email from the auctioneers who were selling this Generals items.

    I begged and plead till my hands turned blue with them to please keep this collection together-and that I knew at least two local Militaria Collectors who are more than wealthy enough to afford paying what those auctioneers could price that collection for. I had hoped that they would have got in touch with that Generals family and had seen if they would be willing to sell for a high price-just so that mans collection could be preserved.

    Among the items I remember drooling over-were so many 8x10 autographed photo's of so many important American and Allied personalities including Ike, Bradley, Devers, Simpson, Monty, Alexander, Pres Roosevelt (and his entire staff) Hap Arnold, Admirals Nimitz, and King and so many many more. Most of these photos also had multi signatures on them. One I remember when reading the names on it-made my jaw drop.

    Of course, amny other itmes were in this group-which consisted of two large wooden crates-full of this Generals belongings. They included his WWI Colt .45-also some presantation pistols he had been given-plus his WWII issue Colt .45, and I don't know what all else? There were also some important WWI and WWII German items with his possessions including busts of famous Germans-Hitlers bust-bronzes and such-and some of Gorings awards-flags and such.

    Needless to say, this Generals items are now scattered to history-thanks to someones greed.
     
  16. James777

    James777 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2008
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    10
    I guess the auction house makes a handsome commision on each auction they present ,ultimately id place blame on the seller who could have stipulated the items remain as one lot but i suspect they made more selling single items one by one.

    Your right about casting history to the 4 winds , i suspect the feeling of having done the right thing remains long after any quick money is gone.

    Not to worry too much , history should be fun too.Heres a pic of my marshmallow toaster.
    I beleive it to be Civil War era and of Navy Origin...avast there matey : )
     

    Attached Files:

  17. chibobber

    chibobber Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2010
    Messages:
    327
    Likes Received:
    87
    Hello all, I know this is an old tread,but am new to the forum. I would like to share what little info I have on the IMT and the insignia and Coastal Artillary insignia.
    My father landed on D-dayplus 31 on utah beach with the 72nd Publicity services and Psych Warfare Battalion.He was a radio truck driver.Assigned to 3rd army then 7th army after sept. Main resposibility was getting war correspondents to the front.Has 5 battle stars on campaign ribbon.After VE day assigned 3rd army 1st division 26th infantry.Posted at Faber castle to set up the translating gear for the trials and to take care of the correspondents.He has the blue/red crest mentioned in the post.He was not a guard. The matter of the Coastal artillary is simple and logical.When he returned to the states he was discharged from active duty and assigned to the reserves,Coastal artillary.He also had the collar device and ID photo and card for the reserve.I hope this helps out.I am always looking for info on his service and have a little bit of info if anybody wishes to ask a question.Have photos also.
    Bob Berry.
     

Share This Page