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How did anybody (British, American, Germans) paratroopers

Discussion in 'WWII General' started by Riter, Feb 16, 2020.

  1. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..yes, I was in the military..I know much about weapons
    what's your point?
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2020
  2. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ....in combat conditions, it is hard to hit your target even with a zeroed non-sniper rifle at over 200 yards ..unless the enemy is standing straight up without cover--point being, I don't think they zeroed weapons ''a lot''.....unless the rifle had major sight damage--then they would probably replace the whole rifle
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2020
  3. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    here is how they zero an M16/M4 at 25M:
     
  4. Riter

    Riter Member

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    OK to respond to an irrelevant issue to the main issue or are you triggered?
     
  5. Sheldrake

    Sheldrake Member

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    Could have been either. The gliders were manned by the Assault Regiment of 7 FJD
     
  6. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    hahahhahahahahah
    good point..hahahahah =????..whatever it is
    why do you people always think you can tell someone's emotion on the internet?? because you can't
    ..triggerred...hahaha...I laugh a lot on forums because of the silly answers
    not triggered, but humored
     
  7. Riter

    Riter Member

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    I'm not the run beating my chest bragging I was in the military and know so much and you people are ignorant and I display it by bringing irrelevant points up in the conversation. Nothing you said discusses the issue of how paratroopers jumped with sniper rifles. If you know, please go on. I'm all ears Mr. Military. BTW, thank you for your service whether you served under our colours or some foreign flag.
     
  8. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..please, let's keep WW2F professional, etc--unlike the other ones
     
  9. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..it's just a statement--a fact...I'm not bragging.....if you take it the wrong way, that's not my fault
    ..someone brought up ''zeroing weapons'' = it is part of the discussion --I was responding to that
    ...seems like a lot of members are ''thinking too much'' about posts
     
  10. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    etc
    Arms of American Airborne
     
  11. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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  12. Riter

    Riter Member

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    Thanks. That's a step in the right direction. I doubt if they jumped with that storage chest though. It's huge and bulky. It would have to be in some sort of hard metal container to survive the impact of the fall.

    Pictures of that chest may be found in Ian Skennerton's book, The British Sniper.
     
  13. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..I think we can all agree the scopes were carried in a ''hardened'' case ....and rifles maybe carried as the other type rifles
     
  14. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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  15. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    The Americans at DDAY by McManus page 163--an 82 AB pathfinder:
    ''he pulled out his knife, cut his way out of his chute, assembled his rifle,.......'''
    assemble his rifle--what does that mean?
     
  16. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    here--page 169:
    Sgt ''Truax was carrying about 100 pounds of equipment, including a sniper rifle'''
    that's all there is though
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2020
  17. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    Military History magazine Special Edition Band of Brothers ...Easy Company..starting page 29:
    ''it was then that we received the famous British leg bag. It was a brilliant idea......The thought was you could put all of your equipment in that leg bag.....and this would keep all of your equipment together.....''
    next page:
    he lost his bag that had all of his equipment and he lost his rifle...I'm guessing the rifle was in the bag?
    no weapon and no equipment in the combat zone!!
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2020
  18. harolds

    harolds Member

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    British/Canadian sniper rifles were issued in the box, which also contained the scope and other accessories. I believe the box stayed with the Bn armorer. When it came time to turn in their weapons the sniper rifle went into its own serial numbered box. Rifle, scope and box were all part of the same "kit" and the box kept everything together. The box helped protect the rifle and scope from bumps and dings while being transported but I don't think it was used to parachute the rifle into the drop zone. there didn't seem to be a lot of padding in that box.

    By the way, if you have some (a lot) of extra cash, these rifles, in the box-with scope, come up on gun auction sites every now and then. I knew a doctor in Laramie who had one, but of course he had every variation of the Enfield rifle!
     
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  19. Riter

    Riter Member

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    The M-1 Garand was broken down into acton, stock and trigger group. Simple to assemble but read of one paratrooper who lost his trigger gorup in the water.
     
  20. Riter

    Riter Member

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    That aluminium case was for the 25x Canadian spotting scope. About 500 were made and it was too late to see service in WW II. The scope itself is an experimental REL 3 1/2 x scope. Note the scope mounting system is Griffin & Howe, which G&H licensed to SAL in Canada to produce at 75 cents per unit or 10%; whichever was lesser. Scope base was made by SAL for its G&H mount.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2020

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