Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

I just finished reading...

Discussion in 'Biographies and Everything Else' started by brndirt1, May 10, 2011.

  1. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    1,501
    Anne Frank Remembered, by Meip Gies and Alison Leslie Gold.

    This latest edition had a prologue and epilogue by her and her co-author which were added shortly before her 100th birthday in 2009. It really covered the two editions of the Diary, both the censured version released by her father, and the definitive version which includes all the stuff removed by her father to protect those who were still alive at the time of the first printing. It also has the real names rather than the pseudonyms used by both Anne and Meips in their first printing, with them explained as to who was whom.

    It also has a very touching portion which was a pair of letters from an American teenager whose teacher had recommended they find "foreign pen-pals", and she picked a young Dutch girl named Annalise (Anne) Frank to write to. She received two letters in return, one from Anne and one from her older sister, but none of her follow-up letters were ever replied to. By then Anne and her family were already in hiding.

    Highly recommended by myself. Very revealing as to occupation life in Amsterdam and the surrounds.
     
  2. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,084
    Likes Received:
    102
    Kewl. I recently finished reading the "definitive edition"....couldn't believe how much I'd forgotten, or was omitted, from the first time I'd read it. Then again, that was back in school, so I was less than interested (to put it nicely) in history or the day-to-day dramas of a teenager and all the details related to "personal" issues.
     
  3. TacticalTank

    TacticalTank Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2011
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Canada
    I recently finished "Pegasus Bridge" and it's 5 stars. I don't really like the Holocaust books AT ALL. There always either a little cruel for me to handle or there just always boring. I tried reading a Anne Frank book but I ended up stopping at about the 50th page due to EXTREME bordom. Although I'm aware most books start out slow; this one is going to be slow for the entire story. Pegasus Bridge also starts out slow but at about page 110 it becomes "A real nail biter" so-to speak.
     
  4. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    1,501
    The Diary of Anne Frank is a bit of a slow starter, and in reality it made a better play and movie than it did a book to my mind. But this Anne Frank Remembered isn't the same type of book in the least. It deals more with the Dutch Resistance outside of the Frank family, but uses them as the base since the lady who wrote the book was one of the office workers in the building where the Frank family hid. This isn't the story of a teen-age girl as seen through her eyes while in hiding, this is the story of the adults who worked to keep her and other Jews alive and hidden in occupied territory.

    If you are looking for "action" like Pegasus Bridge, you might be disappointed. Then again if you are seriously interested in the Nazi occupation of Amsterdam and environs, both the good and the bad; it is a worthwhile read.
     
  5. Gebirgsjaeger

    Gebirgsjaeger Ace

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2010
    Messages:
    4,333
    Likes Received:
    289
    Thats a must read! No really action but a lot of feelings in it.
     
  6. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,084
    Likes Received:
    102
    Also keep in mind that military life, in general, consists of hours of sheer boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror. The length of time of these two events varies, depending on war- vs. peace-time conditions, but this axiom holds true throughout the ages. So most of your books that follow the daily minutiae of a regiment or platoon or even an individual are not going to read like a Hollyscrewed action-packed Bruce Willis guns-blazing blockbuster. There are going to be chapters devoted to history, tracing the roots of the subject, giving details on other units and movements (I tend to get lost in all of the division/regiment/battalion numbers), so that you have a good overview of what's going on AROUND them, which directly affects what is happening TO them. This also includes politics, to a small extent. I used to read those parts and wish that the story would move on and get back to what individuals were doing, until I realized that these parts were necessary to explain the decisions made and the orders given, choices taken and paths chosen. It all ties in. That's where reading the description (...the back cover, or inside of the dust jacket) of the book comes in handy. This will give you an idea of whether the story is following the action, following the politics of the day, or following a 13 year old girl stuck in an attic in Holland and forced to share a room with a cranky older man. All of these books have their place, some of them even find a place on my shelves. But they're all fascinating stories in their own way.
     
  7. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    1,501
    Much like a Major League baseball game these days "RabidAlien"; twenty seconds of real tense action packed tightly into four hours of yawn, beer, yawn, dogs, beer, yawn, last beer.
     
  8. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,084
    Likes Received:
    102
    Heh. Short game, eh? Only three beers? Personally, I don't care much for football, baseball, or basketball. Takes too much time away from the important things in life, like playin on the computer or reading.
     
  9. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    1,501
    The last time I went to a MLB game, the price of the brew is what kept me down to three. I only had fifty bucks to spend on "extras", and with a dog in there my fifty was gone.
     
  10. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    13,807
    Likes Received:
    2,291
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I get to maybe one MLB game a year. I also went to a pro hockey game (mys son has been gifting me with tickets to sports events, since he knows I don't need any more "stuff"). My wife and I had season tickets to the Flyers (Hockey for the uninitiated) for ten years in the 70s and 80s. Now I find it much more comfortable to do my sports watching on TV. My couch is much more comfortable than stadium seats, the food is cheaper, and I can watch wearing whatever I want. Plus, with my laptop on my knees, I can watch and surf at the same time. Sports is really the only thing I watch on TV, and fortunately my wife doesn't mind. I just turn the remote over to her a couple nights a week so she can watch her favorite shows On Demand.

    To get back to the original purpose of this thread, I will be getting the book as an e-book. It's due out in that format on May 31. Sounds like a good read.
     

Share This Page