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Identifying insignia on a swagger stick

Discussion in 'Medals, Insignia, Badges & Recalls' started by Peter1, Oct 21, 2018.

  1. Peter1

    Peter1 New Member

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    My grandma was given this stick circa 1940, supposedly by a German officer who was a PoW in the UK. I've been trying to identify the insignia on it but cannot find anything similar online. I'm hoping you can help.
     

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    Last edited: Oct 21, 2018
  2. Owen

    Owen O

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    Looks like a Royal Scots Greys button, eagle with wreath around neck but the crown above it rules that out.
     
  3. R Leonard

    R Leonard Member

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    One might be tempted to suggest Royal Irish Fusiliers, a Napoleonic eagle with a laurel wreath over the number 8 below the eagle's perch and above all the coronet of HRH The Princess Victoria. However, the eagle was usually found as a collar device on a flaming grenade with the coronet over the flames of the grenade. The location of this insignia on the top of the cap of the stick is a little unusual in my, admittedly, extremely limited knowledge and exposure. A regimental insignia, be it a cap device, which this is not, or a collar device, parts of which this resembles, is usually found on the side of the cap, not on the top (although for our USMC friends, the exact opposite is true, USMC swagger sticks, silver caps for officers, brass for staff NCOs, had the Marine Corps insignia on the top of the cap). Royal Irish Fusilier buttons and such I've seen show the eagle over the 8, but not the coronet.

    The number 8 below the eagle signifies the French 8eme RĂ©giment d'Infanterie de Ligne, the wreath on the eagle signified that regiment's presence at the Battle of Austerlitz. The 8th's colors and eagle were captured by the 87th Regiment of Foot, the lineal antecedent of the Royal Irish Fusiliers, on 5 March 1811 at the Battle of Barrosa. That particular trophy long, long ago stolen and lost, but the staff upon which it stood can be found in the Fusiliers Museum in Armagh.

    Anyway, maybe a place to start a search for similar items. Perhaps sending a picture to the RIF Museum and see what they say might be helpful.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2018
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  4. Peter1

    Peter1 New Member

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    Thank you!
    My grandma told us she was given it by a German officer at/near the PoW camp in Seahill, near Holywood. She would've been 15 years old in 1940. We don't know much more. It definitely appears to be the insignia of the Royal Irish Fusiliers. Coincidentally we now live in Armagh, so I'll email the RIF Museum!
     
  5. R Leonard

    R Leonard Member

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    Well, just out of idle curiosity, let met me know how contact with the RIF museum works out. Frankly, I have not give British Army badges/insignia much thought for about 35 years, but the books are still on the shelf!
     

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