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If Germany took Iceland

Discussion in 'What If - European Theater - Western Front & Atlan' started by Ted, Oct 21, 2006.

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  1. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    Ok, so just 9 were used at Dunkirk. There was still 6 flotillas in existance so there were definitely more than 9 LCA in existance. Aside from that, given that there are plenty of landing locations in Iceland including:

    Sites between Olafsvik and Borgarnes on the coast
    Between Sandgerhi and Halla on the south coast
    At Höfn
    At Eskifjördhur
    At Vonpnafjördhur
    Around the penisula Raufarhöfn is on
    The fjord btween Dalvik and Akureyri
    Saudharkrour
    Even the much larger US and British garrisons would have had difficultly covering every location thoroughly.

    As for Condors: I/KG 40 had exactly 6 Fw 200 C-0 available for service in April 1940. By the end of the month only 2 were still servicable. In the limited number of sorties made the aircraft were flying from Denmark. At the end of June 1940 the unit was withdrawn from operational service to re-equip with the C-1 model. So, the "jaws of a shark" would be largely toothless.
    Also, the effectiveness of the Condor is more myth than truth. Between July 1940 and October 1940 KG 40 with a service strength of about 15 aircraft sank 90,000 tons of shipping flying from Bordeaux-Merignac to Trondheim-Värnes up the coast of Ireland. Of note is that 42,348 tons of that shipping was the sinking of the liner Empress of Britain Northwest of Donegal Bay on October 26th.
    At least two Condors were intercepted by land based aircraft on these flights and shot down (July 13 and 20th).
    A Condor also consumes between 8 and 9 metric tons of fuel per sortie. Also given the early model's structurial problems flying from an unimproved airfield would present problems.
    Part of the problem here is that the Luftwaffe started WW 2 without any maritime patrol aircraft in service. It was not a mission that was considered; and even after it became a necessity it remained a very low priority.
    So, during the period under consideration the maritime patrol capacity of the Luftwaffe is effectively nil.
    The day of the Condor (no pun intended) was well after the period in question. From October 1940 through February 41 British shipping losses to these aircraft rose to 263,000 tons. The number of Condors in service roughly doubled as well. Servicability though remained low with only about 25% operational at any time. Also, the Condors operated largely independent of the U-boats during this period.
    With the increase in Allied air defenses on merchant ships and increasing numbers of catapult and shipboard fighters becoming available Condor crews by mid 1941 finally began to perform maritime reconnissance shadowing convoys and such.
     
  2. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    the "jaws of a shark" would be largely toothless

    Not when one considers all the other aircraft available at the time, & other Condors were just around the corner.The first missions by 1/KG 40 were flown on 4/8/40 against British ships. That's April 1940. & 263,000 tons is myth??!

    "and the first operational sorties followed in April 1940 during the invasion of Norway."


    "unimproved airfield would present problems."

    So they would fly from improved airfields in Norway & Reykjavik, Condors that is.

    "The Ju 88 A-1 series first flew anti-shipping sorties close to Norway", that's early 1940, before BoB.

    "So, during the period under consideration the maritime patrol capacity of the Luftwaffe is effectively nil."

    Unless of course it was made priority, which it undoubtedely would. & d'ya suppose the bombing missions were also considered "maritime patrol" Kinda obvious I would should say. & the word "reccon" does appear with frequency below.

    http://www.nuav.net/ooblw.html

    ng the attack on Norway the 9th of April 1940, these A/C were used:


    Unit Type Airfield Time Number
    of A/C Mission
    1./506 He 115 List auf Sylt 0630 6 Reccon
    2./506 He 115 List auf Sylt 0630 10 Reccon
    1./106 He 115 List auf Sylt 0700 10 Reccon
    1.(F)122 He 111/Do 17 Hamburg 0830 3 Reccon
    1.(F) 120 Do 17 Lubeck 1350 1 Reccon
    Stab/K.G.4 He 111 Fassberg 1445 1 Reccon
    III/KG 26 He 111 Schwerin 0245 25 Bomb missions
    7./KG 4 He 111 Delmenhorst 0522 8 Bomb missions
    8/KG 4 He 111/Ju 88 Delmenhorst 0712 11 Bomb missions
    9/KG 4 He 111 Delmenhorst 0430 6 Bomb missions
    K.Gr 100 He 111 Nordholz 0615 15 Bomb missions
    I./KG 26 He 111 Marx-Oldenburg 0935 8 Bomb missions
    II/KG 4 He 111 Fassberg 1043 9 Bomb missions
    III/KG 4 He 111 Delmenhorst 1335 17 Bombing of Oscarsborg
    II/KG 4 He 111 Fassberg 1400 4 Bombing of Oscarsborg
    I/KG 4 He 111 Perleberg 1454 19 Bombing of Oscarsborg
    I/St.G.1 Ju 87 Kiel-Holtenau 1100 6 Bombing of Oscarsborg
    1/ZG 76 Me 110 Westerland ukn 8 support for para units
    3/ZG 76 Me 110 Westerland ukn 8 support for para units

    The North Sea was heavily patroled by bombers, most from KG 30 and KG 26

    So much for the toothless idea.
     
  3. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    "There was still 6 flotillas in existance" Not exactly. The ones that operated in Norway were volunteer infantry. Training for such an exercise takes time, coordination, how to handle the boats etc. Which boat carries the radio, which ones will go exactly where, study of the landing beaches, study of tidal patterns, weather data & naturally aireal photo recon would be done to study German gun emplacement & harbor defences. The allies were known for serious, often pedantic preparation, Plans would be concieved & forwarded to the traditionally slow British military high command.


    http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htsf/articles/20060419.aspx

    The original commandoes were formed after France fell in mid 1940


    So with that in mind, perhaps they would attempt a landing late summer 1940, ( or perhaps not, they had their hands full with France & BoB ), which gives Germans time to build extra fields, repair & send to Iceland heavy units, Hipper etc & most importantly equipment for German infantry. Landing takes place,no heavy equipment for British, ( no motorized transport ), & wholesale slaughter ensues. Germans dominate the air as allies did late in war, which gives them insurmountable advantage. British troops captured, many ships sunk or damaged, Swordfish decimated, carrier sunk & rest scatter & head home followed by German bombers & U-boats most of the way back. they try again in 41 when Americans get involved.

    [ 01. November 2006, 10:37 PM: Message edited by: chromeboomerang ]
     
  4. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Considering the amount of troops and planes etc invested to the Iceland project once Hitler starts to think about Barbarossa I do think the possible operation to Iceland would be removed from the table. He needs all the planes and men he can have for the BIG operation.

    Besides all the U-boat pens and air fields in France and Norway , I´d think, should be enough for the strategic needs to cover the Atlantic as far as Germany needs really. Just spreading the forces around Europe does not seem good especially on the Luftwaffe´s part.

    So sending troops to Iceland might mean the U-boat pens and air fields at least in France would stay empty?? As Hitler et co were actually downgrading production because the war was won several operations probably could not be achieved.
     
  5. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    "Considering the amount of troops and planes etc invested to the Iceland project once Hitler starts to think about Barbarossa I do think the possible operation to Iceland would be removed from the table. He needs all the planes and men he can have for the BIG operation."


    That's about right.

    He has to choose a direction. Portugal, Spain, Morocco, Africa & no Barbarossa, then Iceland op more feasible.

    U-boats got around, even had em in Indian ocean & Penang. A few could be easily sent to Iceland without depleting French pens.
     
  6. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    "I´d think, should be enough for the strategic needs to cover the Atlantic as far as Germany needs really."

    Don't agree here. Iceland bases offer huge advantage over French ones as coastal command played hell with French pens, & distance is greatly increased from Norwegian bases. Remember distance from Norway to Reykjavik 978 miles. Germans could easliy defend airspace over Icelandic pens, but not French ones, too close to England. It also gives Germans 2 angles of attack on convoys & splits British defense in two.
     
  7. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    " The aeroplane can no more eliminate the submarine than a crow can fight a mole!"

    Admiral Dönitz in Aug 1942 after the failed bombings of the U-boat pens

    ----------

    This was changed once the Tallboy entered the scene in 1944. By then the Germans had lost the war.
     
  8. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    Well, repeating myself again, in May 1940 (and prior thereto) the Luftwaffe's maritime patrol (and naval strike) capability was virtually nil. This, not withstanding the above (and highly inaccurate list) showing operations on the opening day of the Norway campaign.

    In May 1940 the Luftwaffe's primary maritime operations component comprised 7 Küstenfleigergruppen, 106, 406, 506, 706, 806, 906 and KGzbv 108. In addition, there were several Seenotstaffeln operating Do 24 and He 59 aircraft for air-sea rescue.
    The various KüFlGr were equipped as follows:

    106 6 Do 18, 8 He 115
    406 5 Do 26, 3 Ha 139, 29 Do 18
    506 18 He 115
    706 10 Ar 96, 6 He 115
    806 Do 18
    906 10 Do 18
    108 He 59

    During the Norway campaign all of the above were primarily operated as transports; flying troops into various locations. KüFlGr 506 for example flew in troops to the Trondheim - Jonsvatnevt area losing two shot down by fighters.
    Post Norway these groups operated along the European and Norwegian coasts as patrol aircraft. Some, like KüFlGr 506, also flew anti-shipping strikes and mining operations off northern Britain.
    As for KG 26 and 40, neither operated as an anti-shipping strike unit on a regular basis. Instead, during periods of lulls in land warfare they sporatically conducted strikes against naval targets. During the Norway campaign both did attack naval targets on a few occasions but, both were far more regularly employed in supporting land operations.
    While both of these groups did remain in Norway with a combined strength of about 200 aircraft, they lack the range to support operations in Iceland from there. And, I cannot imagine the Luftwaffe wanting to base either unit in Iceland were maintenance, supply, and operational utility of these units would be incredibly difficult to maintain for very little in return.
    Do note that neither at that time was engaged in maritime patrol activities. Also of note was that these aircraft did not coordinate their activities with the Kriegsmarine at the time. Basically, the OKL had little interest in and very little invested in supporting KM operations, U-boat or otherwise in 1940.
    It was not until the formation of the FleigerführerAtlantik command (formed March 1941) that the Luftwaffe took any official interest in maritime patrol in support of the KM.
    So, the shark really is toothless and maritime patrol is a non-mission for the Luftwaffe in May 1940.
     
  9. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    "in May 1940 (and prior thereto) the Luftwaffe's maritime patrol (and naval strike) capability was virtually nil."

    & after they got there & finished transport duties, patrol duties would naturally commence.


    "they lack the range to support operations in Iceland"

    Incorrect. BV 138, Condors, even HE 111 had range enough to cross distance between east coast of Iceland & Trondheim. & other flying boats also had the range. As did JU 88's & ME 110's. Iceland currently has 94 airports/landing strips. One might imagine the Germans could scrath out 8-10 of em on south & east coasts. Pave a few as well.


    Getting back to shipping, one thing that's been overlooked is British submarines, 'they' would likely represent the bigger danger to shipping traffic to Iceland. They can hide from German a/c & wait patiently for their quarry. Bad weather could cause some probs up north, but mainly in wintertime.
     
  10. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    The landing sites below are of negligable value,unless near Reykjavik,( ones on south coast of near no value ), as the objective remains the same, namely Reykjavik harbor & airport. & 30 miles up Hafnarfjordur harbor. Which simplifies German defense.


    "given that there are plenty of landing locations in Iceland including:

    Sites between Olafsvik and Borgarnes on the coast
    Between Sandgerhi and Halla on the south coast
    At Höfn
    At Eskifjördhur
    At Vonpnafjördhur
    Around the penisula Raufarhöfn is on
    The fjord btween Dalvik and Akureyri
    Saudharkrour"
     
  11. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    Many of the listed landing sites are near Reykjavik. The Germans would have to defend many miles of coast to either side of that city to prevent an unopposed landing.

    While, as you point out and I was well aware of, many of the aircraft I previously listed could fly one way to Iceland, they could not fly there and return without refueling. By the by, the Bv 138 did not become available until June 1940 when the first one was made operational. The Fw 200, likewise, was in minimal operational service until later in 1940 than the period under discussion as previously noted.

    Repeating earlier stuff on airfields:

    There is no petroleum or cement industry on Iceland in 1940. Therefore, the Germans would have to import materials for any permanent airfields. But, the problem there is that the German construction industry as a whole, along with construction troops and engineers in the military in general, is almost completely non-mechanized. Orgainzation Todt was largely dependent on manual labor to complete virtually any project, including the West Wall, the later Atlantic Wall, the Autobahn system, etc. Typically cement mixers and cranes / gantries were the only available mechanized equipment. If you look at the TO&E of Wehrmacht engineering units the only regular motorized construction item listed is one and two man chainsaws.
    A single paved runway would require thousands of tons cement along with hundreds of kilometers of rebar, wire mesh, thousands of tons of sand and gravel all having to be shipped there. Asphalt is out of the question as there is already a shortage of this material in Germany. Aside from that an asphalt plant would be required to mix and heat the material as well as a considerable amount of mechanized equipment to move, spread, and set it.
    Thus, as previously noted, it is extremely unlikely that the Germans could build any kind of airfield except a grass or dirt strip without hardstands, hangers, buildings or other infrastructure. They simply lack the equipment and means to make it happen.
    Therefore, aside from the fuel issue, there is absolutely no way, short of the Germans dropping everything else going on, to turn Iceland into any sort of major basing location. And, in the face of superior British sea power, they could not do it except at very high cost in losses.
    The bottom line remains Iceland is nothing but a certain loss of uncertain size to the Germans as an operation.

    A bit of additional information:

    Iceland had a population of 120, 264 in 1939 with about 25,000 of that living abroad mostly in Canada. Their trawler fleet consisted of 38 vessels totalling 12,715 grt with another 3,575 grt in other fisheries vessels including several fisheries protection boats. There were 222 other small vessels totalling 6,225 grt serving various purposes in Iceland.
    There are about 3000 miles of mostly unpaved road on the island and much of the island is still served by pack horse or small horsedrawn cart. There were about 2000 private or commercial motor vehicles on the island.
    How much of these totals would become useable to the Germans is very problematic and cannot be estimated.
     
  12. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    Right, they fly one way, refuel at Iceland airport, then fly back. Or in the case of aircraft with smaller ranges, refuel in east fiords. Do 24's still fly today.
    For news regarding the worldtrip of the Do-24ATT please check the official website:
    http://www.do-24.com

    & the fiords of east Iceland make ideal flyingboat bases. 8 are deep water year round ice free harbors.These flying boats are perfect for maritime sea patrol. Small fuel carrying ships could operate in these fiords to handle fuel issues. U-boats would co-operate in these fiords as well.

    http://www.east-iceland.is/access/index.html

    Here's a map.

    http://www.east-iceland.is/map.html

    Creative use of available resources is all that's needed here. Iceland currently has 80.000 horses, dunno how many it had in 1940, but it was in the tens of thousands, these would be used as patrol all along the south & east coasts with radio outposts all along the route. Heavy patrol of north coast not neccessary. Iceland is 305 miles wide, the south & east coasts could be well patrolled by infantry on horseback.


    Fuel situation was favorable in 1940 for these type operations.

    "At the outbreak of the war, Germany’s stockpiles of fuel consisted of a total of 15 million barrels. The campaigns in Norway, Holland, Belgium, and France added another 5 million barrels in booty, and imports from the Soviet Union accounted for 4 million barrels in 1940 and 1.6 million barrels in the first half of 1941. "
     
  13. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    Submarines & small ships & sailing boats...

    At the request of the German command, Italian submarines were used as early as April 1941 to transport fuel for the most advanced elements of the Africa Corps. They discharged their cargo at Derna. Coastal shipping along the African coast was organized with small ships and sailing boats with auxiliary motors.


    & Aircraft..


    c. January-June 1942

    During this period, transportation was favored by German superiority in the air, which was gained by the German Second Air Force under Kesselring and also by the fact that Malta was suppressed. The transportation of troops and supplies functioned smoothly and with few losses. Enough supplies were moved forward to enable the German-Italian Army to launch an offensive with limited objectives that advanced as far as the borders of Egypt in May-June. In addition, adequate supplies were stockpiled for a period of six to eight weeks against the eventuality of the air forces and naval vessels being employed in an operation to capture Malta.

    That's how it was done, & if they could supply Kola penninsula, they could as well supply east Iceland. With 240 Icelandic ships of various size, plus whatever Norwegian ships were captured, the issue of supply presents no major problems.
     
  14. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    The BV 138 was first flown in 1937 and was used by the Luftwaffe all over Europe, the Baltic Sea and Scandinavia - often flying for hours far out over the sea in search of allied convoys. This long-range maritime reconnaissance flying boat was utilized until the end of the war not only for anti-shipping but also for personnel transports whereby ten fully equipped infantry troops could be carried which actually required no modification of the plane. The Luftwaffe's famous special-operations unit, KG 200, used one for this purpose. Fully loaded it could fly over 4000 kilometers and stay up for 16 hours. This range could be increased even further when using RATO packs (Rocket Assisted Take-offs) or when launched from catapults on board seaplane tenders.

    http://home.swipnet.se/our_stuff/Planes/Pictures/Tenderships.htm

    Although the BV 138 was able to carry small loads of bombs and depth-charges and thereby do attack missions such as sub-hunting, most operations were pure reconnaissance and surveillance,

    Some BV 138 A's were used as transporters for the norwegian campaign in 1940,


    & it has been said that more U-boats were sunk during the war via Iceland than any other locale, so it's possession has defensive value as well as offensive. Likely lose it in 41 when US carriers with Wildcats could be used, but even so, it takes time to build the structure to facilitate anti U-boat activities which gives Germans much easier time in Atlantic for 1st 2 &1/2 yrs of the war.
     
  15. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    So, we return to the fuel situation. As previously noted, German bombers take anywhere between 3 and 10 metric tons of fuel per sortie.
    Iceland in 1939 imported about 13,500 metric tons of petroleum products per year, or about 1100 tons per month. If the Germans wanted to sustain the economy at some level some portion of this would still have to be imported. If at the same time, as proposed, Iceland became a refueling base for U-boats, KM warships, and a large number of Luftwaffe bombers this requirement might double or more.
    At 2000 tons per month this represents just about 1% of the total German petroleum output.
    U-boats cannot supply this. Nor can an airlift unless the Luftwaffe planned to permanently strip all of its training centers of pilots and put virtually every Ju 52 available to flying in fuel. Even then, shipping in the majority will be required. This does not even begin to count the shipping requirements for munitions, food (largely imported too), repair parts, and everything else necessary to maintain a garrison.
    Given the abyssmial record of German shipping to North Africa it is doubtful if less than 30 to 50% greater shipping amounts will be necessary to sustain these levels in the face of losses due to enemy action. For air transport one can look to numerous German airlifts throughout the war to see that they were incapable of sustaining a major airhead to supply a large unit of ground troops.
    It is also doubtful if Hitler, or the Luftwaffe would be willing to devote any great amount of resources to Iceland with the impending invasion of the Low Lands and France in the wings. So, the garrison is almost certainly going to be largely left to swing in the wind without resupply.

    As for the BV 138, the first BV 138A-1 flew in April 1940. The Luftwaffe, desperate for additional transport aircraft impressed this plane and the second production model into service with KGzbV 108 for the Norway operation even though the first production aircraft had made a single test flight and the second had never been flown.
    At the end of the Norway operation these aircraft were transfered to KüFlGr 506 and by October 1940 an additonal 10 were delivered. All continiously suffered from very low operational rates due to problems with their Jumo 205C-4 diesel engines (particularly the centerline one which had a tendency to overheat and detonate), the bow turret MG 204 cannon which had serious jamming problems along with the turret itself which proved highly unreliable in service. Additionally, exhaust problems with the engines also prevented them obtaining full power in operation.
    Through the end of 1940 the BV 138 remained very marginally operational with few sorties actually being flown for the above reasons.
    The BV 138B-1 which rectified most of these problems first flew in December 1940 and the first producton B model was not delivered until March 1941. Only 7 were delivered before being superceded by the C model on the production line starting in April 1941.
    Basically, the BV 138 is largely irrelevant to the discussion. The key elements are the Germans might have been able to land a reasonable force of say regimental size in Iceland (at most). Once there this unit was largely going to be on its own. Resupply would be hit and miss and very much problematic. Engineering and construction would be minimal. The Luftwaffe at this point in the war has no doctrine or ability to support KM operations either. So, aircraft on Iceland would be operating independently of the navy as well.
    The end result is the garrison would eventually be lost and it would accomplish little or nothing for its efforts. They might in fact, bring the US into the war even sooner if they were to attack US escorted convoys approaching the MOMP (Mid-Ocean Meeting Point) were the British took over convoys from US escorts.
     
  16. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    Nope, BV 138 flew in 1937. & recon duties have nothing to do with gun jams. One doesn't need 50 of em to do recon, so yes it is relevant to the subject, as is Do 24 & others. Independent of the navy?? ridiculous. Heck even Hitler mentioned U-boat ops against Iceland. You act as though the Germans were retarded 3rd graders who couldn't build piers let alone wipe their bums for lack of finding the target. It's just silly. Engineering & construction was already being done in 38 "BY THE GERMANS" on the island, again, the equipment for that would still likely be there. & Icelanders did much construction going back to 1913, so guess what, they had equipment on the island for construction. Wouldn't be minimal.Plenty of concrete on hand as well.


    "1% of the total German petroleum output.
    U-boats cannot supply this. Nor can an airlift unless the Luftwaffe planned to permanently strip all of its training centers of pilots and put virtually every Ju 52 available to flying in fuel."

    Great, so send a tanker. Use the cargo ships, or sizeable ships captured in Norway & Iceland. Improvize. Plus your figure is not relevant to the german need, it is rather what the Icelandic fishing fleet needs, & other domestic use, not what U-boats & a few Condors & other a/c would use, irelevant to the discussion. They would also drain Icelandic fishing vessels, & use airport fuel depot, & as well the harbor fuel depots.


    If they could support Penang, they could support Iceland. & remember, the U-tanker was part of the scenario, 700 tons of supplies they carried in WW1.

    "food (largely imported too),"

    Wrong again, as I pointed out Iceland has & had large beef, & sheep farming, is self sufficient in eggs, milk & several vegetables.


    As for food & horses..
    http://www.bondi.is/landbunadur/wgbi.nsf/key2/icelandic_agriculture

    Iceland is primarily a food-producing country. For centuries, the country's basic industries have been agriculture, fishing and fish processing.and Iceland is self-sufficient in the production of meat, dairy products, eggs and to a large extent also in the production of certain vegetables.

    By 1940, 32% of the employable population worked in agriculture.


    Now if they were self sufficient in food for 120.000 people, an extra 10-15.000 could also be fed,Logic dictates. Import some of it, & if neccessary, eat the horses.
     
  17. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    "For air transport one can look to numerous German airlifts throughout the war to see that they were incapable of sustaining a major airhead to supply a large unit of ground troops."

    Wrong again, they did it in Norway & in fact, it was one of the deciding fators in that campaign, couldn't be wronger.


    c. January-June 1942

    During this period, transportation was favored by German superiority in the air, which was gained by the German Second Air Force under Kesselring and also by the fact that Malta was suppressed. The transportation of troops and supplies functioned smoothly and with few losses. Enough supplies were moved forward to enable the German-Italian Army to launch an offensive with limited objectives that advanced as far as the borders of Egypt in May-June. In addition, adequate supplies were stockpiled for a period of six to eight weeks against the eventuality of the air forces and naval vessels being employed in an operation to capture Malta.


    "The Luftwaffe at this point in the war has no doctrine or ability to support KM operations either. So, aircraft on Iceland would be operating independently of the navy as well."


    This is also nonsense. Look at the Invasion of Norway. Complete cooperation of all 3 forces, army, navy, & airforce. German were 1st to do it in a major operation.


    From bases in northern Jutland the Luftwaffe maintained complete air superiority over the narrow waters of the Kattagat and Skagerrak; except for submarine penetration, the Royal Navy would not dare enter these waters. The prime reason for Oslo's importance to the High Command was that Norway's capital was the only port on the southem coast which was capable of handling the logistics of an invading army.

    There it is, "airforce" working to cover "navy" ships which are transporting "army" troops.
     
  18. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    Mechanization & fishing fleet. Assembly lines were built in the 30's. Again, not so backwards as some have thought.

    http://www.superhighway.is/manufacturer/Landssmidjan/

    Now, the larger percentage of Icelands fishing catches are exported, therefore, the larger portion of those ships would be drained of fuel as only enough ships to feed the local population would be retained for fishing use, the rest would be drained as was the german custom wherever they went. The remainder would be divided up for coastal patrol duties, or in the case of oceangoing vessels, used for supply duties, fuel, men & materials etc.

    German war fuel consumption would be less than Icelandic commercial fishing needs.
     
  19. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    This kinda interesting. U-30 visits Reykjavik in 39.

    Within a fortnight, U 30 is herself a victim, when she is bombed by Skuas from British carrier HMS Ark Royal on 14 September 1939. With a slightly damaged bow and two torpedo tubes out of action, U 30 puts in to Reykjavik, Iceland, on 19 September to land a seriously wounded man before she returns to sea.

    & yes, some of the Icelandic transport was primitive.

    http://www.ugoto.com/pictures/mans-gotta-carry-the-heavy-load.html
     
  20. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Why not choose Stalingrad as the example??
     
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