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If you died of the coronavirus, post here.

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by OpanaPointer, Mar 17, 2020.

  1. wm.

    wm. Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it does.
    You will not find an example of a virus that got more deadly in a longer time.

    A virus that kills fast creates inadverently its own social distance that prevents its spreading.
    The best strategy is "live and let live," or at least "kill sparingly."
    All the successful viruses do that.
     
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  2. ARWR

    ARWR Active Member

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    No wrong - that is only the characteristic of a long term "successful" virus but viruses can turn deadly and then vanish. A good example is "the Sweats" that afflicted Tudor England in the last years of Edward VI's reign. This appears to have been some form of flu that mutated and started killing its victims within hours of symptoms occurring. It killed very large numbers and then vanished probably because it outran its ability to transmit. More recently the Spanish Flu was another flu virus that mutated and became deadlier in the second wave (before changing again and being milder in the third). As mutation is random there is no reason why the Corvid 19 could not turn the wrong way and kill many more before it either died out or mutated again.
     
  3. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

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    So, you feel that a vaccine will not be very effective? Will not help to keep me on this earth?
     
  4. wm.

    wm. Well-Known Member

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    I don't know, but it seems everybody says so (except people selling vaccines).
    That the vaccine will be no different from flu vaccines. Somewhat effective but not quite.
     
  5. wm.

    wm. Well-Known Member

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    Exactly, it made a mistake and paid the price. This is why I wrote that such behavior isn't in viruses' best interest.
     
  6. ARWR

    ARWR Active Member

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    Viruses have no interests best or otherwise, they make no mistakes as their evolution is purely random and it is misleading to anthropomorphise. The ones that survive long term are the ones with the most lucky rolls of natures dice. A 'bad' roll might be fatal for the virus but also fatal for us. There is nothing inevitable about the Covid19 becoming milder (or more virulent)
     
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  7. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

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  8. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    The HIV virus was deadly because the surface proteins kept changing. And there was no place for the vaccination to hurt the virus.thus 'Magic' Johnson is a kind of miracle. If Corona surface stays stable we have a possibility to win the battle. Otherwise it might take years.
     
  9. ARWR

    ARWR Active Member

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    Vaccination does not directly 'hurt' the virus. It 'teaches' the body's own immune system to recognise the virus and deal with it. HIV avoids this because its 'appearance' keeps changing.
     
  10. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    That is the only way for a fast solution. If the Corona virus has a stable protein on its surface that can be attacked By the vaccine I.e. The human immune Mechanik we are a long step winning the battle.
     
  11. ARWR

    ARWR Active Member

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    Once again - vaccines attack nothing they teach the immune system to recognise the target
     
  12. wm.

    wm. Well-Known Member

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    Yes, viruses have no interests, they aren't even alive but it's useful to use anthropomorphic metaphors to explain things.

    Evolution isn't random.
    It's survival of the fittest, i.e., it's not survival of the strongest, fastest, or smartest
    but the survival of the best adapted for the immediate, local environment.

    The virus is doing that, it's adapting to its local environment. And the best way to do it is the "live and let live" strategy.
    For that reason the virus is not going to kill us all, actually, it's aiming for a symbiotic relationship with us.
    Because it's all about the survival of the best adapted for the immediate, local environment.
     
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  13. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Yes, but without the anybody or vaccine recognizing the hostile protein the immune system does not work. Both are needed here.
     
  14. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    .....correct....like HIV stays ''dormant'' for a long time...you can have it for years and not know it - increasing the number of people in contact with it
     
  15. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    if a virus kills fast, than it doesn't spread as much as a virus that doesn't kill fast....
     
  16. ARWR

    ARWR Active Member

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    No the virus is not adapting nor is it aiming at anything. Survival of the fittest is a total misunderstanding of Darwin - the blind mechanism of evolution ensures that what survives is the best able to reproduce itself down the generations. Those mutations that favour this will produce more copies of themselves to produce more copies in the long term. But there is no choice in this - mutations are in themselves random and some sequences may well lead down dead ends (as the fossil record shows) thus it is quite possible for disease organisms to evolve into short term variants that kill their hosts and therefore themselves.
     
  17. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    The virus usually once inside the human cell turns it into a virus factory. If I recall correctly once enough viral copies the human cell breaks Down and the new viruses are set free to find other human cells to create even more viruses.
     
  18. wm.

    wm. Well-Known Member

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    As I've said it's merely a useful metaphor,
    everybody is doing it,
    as in electricity chooses the path of least resistance.
     
  19. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    Here's hoping to see a post from you soon. ;)

    Oh, I almost forgot to add that I'm still not dead... as far as I know.
     
  20. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    A good example of a deadly virus is Ebola. 'Fortunately' the disease process is so fast that it cannot By itseself spread far as it kills the victims fast.
     

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