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Ike Jacket Sleeve Insignia

Discussion in 'Uniforms, Personal Gear (Kit) and Accessories' started by Emzel, Sep 10, 2019.

  1. Emzel

    Emzel New Member

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    Can someone help clarify the meaning of this? My father's Ike jacket has 2 divisional patches. Right shoulder has a 3rd Armored Division patch and the left shoulder has a 106th Infantry Division patch. He served in the 3rd Armored Division so why would the jacket have a 106th Infantry Division patch?
     
  2. RRA227

    RRA227 Member

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    Previous unit patch? Rich A. in pa.
     
  3. Emzel

    Emzel New Member

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    Rich, dad never mentioned anything about the 106th. I can only think he was attached to the 106th for return home.
     
  4. chibobber

    chibobber Member

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    He may have been assigned to the 106th at the end of the war to build points to return home. If you have his discharge papers,scan and post them.There are many here that are great at getting the most info out of them.
     
  5. Emzel

    Emzel New Member

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    Hi Chibobber, that's a good thought. I'm working on getting his discharge papers and will do so when I get them.
     
  6. KMZgirl

    KMZgirl Member

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    Dad was with the 90ID for the first 7 months of his service (state side). The 90ID went to Europe, but he did not. He ended up in the Asiatic Pacific Theater. So, I have items from both.... and his discharge papers have yet another unit that he assigned to on the way home... It's fascinating to follow these men and their their service. Let us know what you find.
     
  7. Emzel

    Emzel New Member

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    Thanks KMZgirl.
     
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  8. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    Right shoulder is usually prior service unit. Left shoulder "current" unit. That would suggest he was with the 106th ID when he was discharged. At the end of the War, many soldiers were transferred for various reasons. The most common being: transport back to the States for discharge, transfer to unit remaining in Europe for Occupation Duty, transfer to a unit going to the Pacific for the anticipated invasion of Japan. Since the 106th stayed in Europe for the Occupation, that seems the most likely scenario.
     
  9. Buten42

    Buten42 Member Patron  

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  10. wooley12

    wooley12 Active Member

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    Good info, thanks. I just learned why my father's Ike has 1st Ranger on the right and 474th Infantry Regiment is on the left.
     
  11. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    That is not strictly correct in a historical sense, but rather reflects the modern regulations rather than how the wearing developed at the end of the war. During the war, distinctive army, corps, and divisional insignia patches were worn on the left shoulder. At the end of the war when soldiers returned to the "Zone of the Interior" (CONUS) as casuals (including sick and wounded RTD as well as high-points men), they were then usually assigned to new divisions, but were reluctant to change their old shoulder insignia for that of the new division, which was especially true of National Guardsmen originally assigned to their own "State" division. War Department Circular 111, dated 7 April 1945, recognized that and permitted returning personnel to shift their old insignia to the right shoulder, while wearing that of assigned unit on the left. However, it did not recognize "combat" service, but rather overseas service and applied equally to front line combat and rear echelon service troops.

    So, unlike current practice, it was not an "award" for combat service.
     
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  12. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, some separate battalions and regiments were the exception to the rule that the shoulder patch reflected echelons of division and above. Most battalions and regiments had a distinctive unit insignia, but it typically was a collar device rather than a shoulder patch. For the majority, if they wore a shoulder patch it was Branch distinctive. For example, most AAA battalions simply wore the "AA" patch of the Antiaircraft Command. Most Separate Tank Battalions wore the same red-white-blue triangular Armored Force patch, sometimes with the battalion number embroidered on it. However, it is rare to see other non-divisional Field Artillery, Engineer, Ordnance, Quartermaster, or other personnel wearing a shoulder patch, They typically just wore their Branch collar insignia.
     
  13. wooley12

    wooley12 Active Member

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    Here is what I find from my research. The 474th was directed to pay attention to uniform detail and to look sharp. Dad's Ike was given to him by D. H. McCullough, the quartermaster of the ship that brought them home. D. H. had been in the FSSF HQ with my dad. McCullough would have been on top of what the regs were at that time and place.
    I don't know what ex Ranger and FSSF were displaying but this is how the 99th Infantry Btn (Separate ) did it. A US ski commando unit comprised of Norwegian Americans

    "On the 22nd May 1945 Brigadier General Owen Summers issued the orders that Task Force “A” be moved to Norway to assist in the de-arming of the 400,000 Wehrmacht soldiers present in Norway.

    The Battalion was issued brand new uniforms with the Battalion Badge on one sleeve, and the Regiment Badge on the other."

    Norway...Finally!!!
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
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  14. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Yep that was one of the unofficial variations, but it was not sanctioned by Army Regulations. McCullough may have been on top of General Summers orders for Task Force 'A', but that was not according to AR as defined by WD Circular 111.
     
  15. wooley12

    wooley12 Active Member

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    I don't disagree. Uniform regs weren't so uniform at the front IME. It would be good PR for the 99th to wear their patch in Norway.
     
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