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In memory of my uncle Clarence Schaeg KIA 12/121944

Discussion in 'Honor, Service and Valor' started by 36thID, Dec 11, 2015.

  1. 36thID

    36thID Member

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    Hello Everyone ! Like a cold I'm back ! Just wanted to drop in and share these with you.....

    This is my annual post about my uncle, Clarence Schaeg. I do this so we never forget about the hero's that gave their life so we can be free..... He served with the fathers of Patti Stickle​ and Michael Patrick Cahoon​. He is admired and respected by my good friend Gerome Villain, a 36th historian in the Voges Mountains.

    As a young man, he had it all. He had looks, he was Hollywood handsome and always had a woman on one arm and another lined up ! He had ability, he was one of the best pitchers in the area. This was confirmed years ago by the late Hank Arft. Hank played for the St Louis Browns. His brother Archie was his catcher and a good one. Both were scouted by the Cardinals and offered minor league contracts. They turned them down. They made more money working in the Chesterfield Valley (Gumbo for the locals) at .29 cents an hour !

    He enlisted in 1940 and was an original member of the 36th Infantry Division, 141st Regiment, Cannon Company. The 36th was the Texas National Guard that was Federalized on November 25, 1940. The 36th trained hard and became Amphibious specialist, which was difficult and dangerous. As a member of Cannon Company, the Nazi's were trying to knock their big guns out every day. He saw some horrendous battles.

    Service and Battle Records:

    Louisiana and Carolina Maneuvers
    North Africa in reserve
    The Invasion of Salerno Italy (1st Arrowhead)
    Cassino and the deadly Rapido River Crossing
    The Battle of San Pietro
    The legendary breakout of Anzio and the capture of Velletri Italy
    The capture of Rome Italy the first Axis capitol captured
    The Invasion of Southern France (2nd Arrowhead)
    The Battle of Montelimar France and the capture of the German 19th Army
    The Battle of the Lost Battalion in Eastern France
    The final battle was the Colmar Pocket in the Voges Mountains

    He was killed in action on December 12, 1944, in Hunawhir, France. It was a brutal hand to hand fight. The fanatical and desperate Germans wanted to prevent the 36th Division from crossing into their homeland which was just a few miles away. along the Alsace plains. He was killed with 5 other members of Cannon Company that morning.

    He is buried in the Lorraine American Cemetery, in St Avold, France. May he and the others hero's of WW 2 rest in peace....

    View attachment 23469 View attachment 23470
     
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  2. 36thID

    36thID Member

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    I'm trying to upload pictures I have. When it comes to computers, I'm a ninkaput ! Hope this works !


    As you can see he was a Sargent. This is the last time my family saw him. Just before he left for North Africa. View attachment 23472

    These shots were either at Ft Blanding, or at the Louisiana or Carolina Maneuvers
    View attachment 23473

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  3. 36thID

    36thID Member

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    This speaks for itself.....

    View attachment 23483


    From his church service on January 5, 1945. The great Pastor Martin Olsen baptized,confirmed gave his memorial service.

    View attachment 23476

    This bothers me....He was in the war for 4 years yet his tombstone says Private, not even PFC ! He saw all those battles yet it reads as a boot camp Private. Not to disparage a Private, but he saw so many fierce battles....On December 6, 1944 6 days before he was KIA he was busted down to Private. Not confirmed, but I heard he decked a new Lieutenant for getting some of his buddies, wounded or killed....

    View attachment 23477
     

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  4. 36thID

    36thID Member

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  5. Otto

    Otto No More Half Measures Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Great thread, thanks for sharing this information. Im glad you are giving Clarence his due.
     
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  6. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Private. He was wearing T-4 stripes in one of the pictures. I wonder if he was rough and tumble?

    Do you have an account of the action that resulted in his death?
     
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  7. bronk7

    bronk7 New Member

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    Salute ......and thoughts to all
     
  8. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

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    Ditto and a great story. The battle about Hunawihr (Operation Habicht) and other villages was fierce. Hunawirh was wiped out. from the map in December 1944 Himmler himself came there and spent Christmas at Wuenheim.
    U.S. and French 1st army fough in the area and surrounded the Germans in the Colmar Pocket. They and broke up the pocket in February 1945 only. Many Germans fought until the end and resisted when all others had crossed the Rhine long ago. I have a registered letter from Riquewihr from February 19th 1945 , which was the last day the German postal services worked there .

    http://standwheretheyfought.jimdo.com/alsace-2011-the-battle-of-riquewihr-and-operation-habicht-dec-12-dec-14-1944-then-and-now/
     
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  9. CAW1

    CAW1 Member

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  10. ColHessler

    ColHessler Member

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    He was a great man. Thank you for sharing.
     
  11. CAW1

    CAW1 Member

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    My uncle served from 42'-45' in the Australia, Admiralty Islands, New Guinea, Leyte Gulf and the Philippine Islands and was a PFC when KIA and received the Silver Star posthumously. Hard to tell what actions his received it for. He was awarded it 2 months after his KIA and the command got it's bearings long enough to fill out the reports. A lot of brave actions got lost in the confusion of war. I'm convinced with the subjectivity in awarding the valor awards, a lot of valor and just due was missed. I think they knew my uncle's deeds warranted a MOH and missed the mark from citing him from the field. So much so they later named a major occupational camp after him. I think the brass probably witnessed his death. He was in active combat for 3 years and never rose above PFC. So the rank thing means nothing but errant paperwork
     

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