Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Interview with zero pilot

Discussion in 'Air War in the Pacific' started by Kai-Petri, Oct 14, 2007.

  1. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    22,512
    Likes Received:
    1,086
    Location:
    Kotka,Finland
    Japan at War: interview with a Zero pilot

    Komachi Sadamu, his first campaign was on 8 December 1941, his last battle was fought on 17 August 1945. An Imperial Japanese Navy pilot who fought throughout the Pacific right from the outset of the war until two days after Japan's surrender tells his story.
     
  2. Falcon Jun

    Falcon Jun Ace

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    Messages:
    1,281
    Likes Received:
    85
    Quite an interesting read. Some guys just have the knack of being a survivor. Thanks for posting the website.
     
  3. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    6,724
    Likes Received:
    1,087
    I can't believe this post only has one comment. This link can surely answer a few question about the mind-set and capabilities of the Japanese forces in WW2.
     
  4. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    13,777
    Likes Received:
    2,274
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    You're right Biak. An incredible read. It just went into my bookmarks for a full examination later. I really enjoy reading first hand accounts, from all sides.

    I'm sure there is a ton of this kind of information from older posts that I just haven't had time to dig up. So many posts, so little time.
     
  5. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    6,724
    Likes Received:
    1,087
    Lou, I just found a few more than I'm interested in. Bumped another to the "front page" and bookmarked some more too.
     
  6. Karma

    Karma Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2009
    Messages:
    517
    Likes Received:
    93
    Fantastic read. Thanks very much.
     
  7. surfersami

    surfersami Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    32
    It is incredible that he survived the war start to finish!
     
  8. Carl W Schwamberger

    Carl W Schwamberger Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2007
    Messages:
    1,051
    Likes Received:
    81
    Some folks avoid this kind of thing as they prefer the myths. Also I've been told by a couple people that eyewitness accounts are worthless & to be avoided. they lecture to me how the writing of academic historians are the only way to get the "facts".

    Saburo Saki left some very interesting descriptions of his experince as a naval fighter pilot. Those were translated to English back in the 1950s & 1960s. They created quite a sensation when published back then.
     
  9. John Dudek

    John Dudek Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2001
    Messages:
    395
    Likes Received:
    36
    Good stuff! Thanks for sharing!
     
  10. wwiifan1

    wwiifan1 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Unbelievible how he survived from Pearl Harbor all the way to the end of the war! Amazing interview!
     
  11. hdblue

    hdblue recruit

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi,

    Thanks for all. Good luck for you. I have some my ideals. I'll share soon again.

    If you want to do more info, you also visit at: Pilot interview questions
    Tks again.
     
  12. mac_bolan00

    mac_bolan00 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    717
    Likes Received:
    20
    looks like this guy was thicker in the action than sakai. he was at pearl harbor and coral sea.

    after sakai's publish book "samurai," he was interviewed a number of times, and even invited to fly a p-51D (don't think he ever had the chance to fight a mustang.) one telling thing about the interviews was when he was asked which feature in the zero he liked best. it wasn't the outstanding maneuverability or the long loiter time. what he liked best were the twin .25-caliber machine guns on top of the cowling that lined up perfectly along the pilot's line-of-sight. it was perfect for snap-shooting at the enemy's cockpit whenever he came within 50 meters. is that a trained killer or what?
     
  13. CactusJackSlade

    CactusJackSlade Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    1
    Interesting view into his experience - thanks for posting the link!

    CJS
     
  14. Victor Gomez

    Victor Gomez Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    115
    Amazing description of his views especially how frustrated he was with the radios......I am sure all pilots of WWII knew of the importance of the ability to communicate when you are so heavily committed to a mission. Any malfunction of your "tools of the trade" would be a very great frustration. He clearly describes how the "top" didn't realize the real predicament of the fight in the skies with their attention based more intently on the striking forces instead of defense of the carrier.
     
  15. CPL Punishment

    CPL Punishment Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2009
    Messages:
    177
    Likes Received:
    44
    Surely you mean twin 7.7mm (.30 cal) MGs? Unless this refers to a A6M variant I'm not aware of...
     
  16. Vanir

    Vanir Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2008
    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    27
    I thought that too CPL Punishment, but I've heard some vets remember things which are faithful renditions but technically inaccurate, Brown's 190D-9 evaluation was actually a D-12 as it turned out (ergo US postwar D-9 evaluations are dramatically different to Brown's and they considered them much more of an impressive hack than a superior performer), one of Reschke's Ta-152 flight accounts mentions one engine type specifically although his own pilot book records a different model with another engine type for that particular flight (when brought up he deferred to the record and a blurred memory which is perfectly reasonable and by no means infringes the gentleman's overall veracity...just you'd double check any personal account with technical/official records if you were writing an encyclopedia obviously).

    Since by 1945 zeroes still being produced were routinely fitted with one or two .50 calibres in the nose (one actually but because the water injection guage went where the other breech would've been iirc), this particular Japanese pilot probably just remembers the earlier nose armament as half the calibre of the later one. You could roughly say from a field point of view, the 7.7mm is half the calibre of the 12.7mm so he probably just remembers it that way, and the fact Japan was metric back then so he's not very accustomed to imperial calibres. Saying ".25 calibre" only sounds so wrong because we're all so used to american nomenclature of .30 calibre and .50 calibre in the Brownings, this vet might think the 7.92 is a .30 and the 7.7 is a .25 because he's so used to metric and a .303 is way more powerful than a 7.7mm Japanese or Italian.
     
  17. Messy1

    Messy1 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2011
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Interesting article. Thanks for posting.
     
  18. Colonel FOG

    Colonel FOG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2011
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    22
    A pleasant and informative read. Thanks for posting it.
     
  19. kerryjennings110

    kerryjennings110 recruit

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
  20. Carronade

    Carronade Ace Patron  

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Messages:
    2,594
    Likes Received:
    480
    Just ran across this - thanks to Kai-Petri whenever he has a chance to read this.

    One comment, the heavier machine guns fitted to some later Zero models were 13.2mm, which would be about .52 caliber.
     

Share This Page