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Iranian Pilots During Iran/Iraq War (IIW), Memoirs, Pictures and ...

Discussion in 'Military History' started by TIRDAD, Mar 13, 2016.

  1. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    Top gun of Iran`s airforce, World Ace w/ F14 Tomcat,

    2nd Brigadier General F.A. Mazandarani:

    Freydoon-Ali Mazandarani (1330, Tehran) Iran`s Air Force F-14 fighter flying ace who served in the Iran-Iraq war. Highlights of his career include hunting Iraqi aircraft on 26 Shahrivar 1359, ie 5 days before the official start of the war.

    "Fereydoon-Ali Mazandarani" After hiring Imperial Iranian Air Force, with the martyr, "Maj. Gen. Mostafa Ardestani" as the pilot of the F-5 - Northrop, and then transfered to Dezful Air Base. in 1356, he was transfered to Isfahan AB, as F-14 Pilot.

    Among the important activities he carried out, the first aerial refueling in the night by the F-14 instructor pilot in the rear cockpit martyr " Maj. Gen. Hashem al-Agha" two weeks before the official start of the war, that was the beginning of the day and night protecting Iran`s sky.

    Air kills:

    He is known as F-14 Pilot, He has 9 aerial reliable and two possibility Victories, that makes his kills to number 11. Some of them are:

    With Foenix Missile, 6 Iraqi planes, as below:

    26 Shahrivar 1359, in accordance with the September 17, 1980, with Lt. Qasem Sultani, an aircraft.

    3 Mehr 1359 according to the September 25, 1980, with Lt. Gholam Reza Najafi, two aircrafts.

    9 Azar 1359 in accordance with the November 11, 1980, with Lieutenant Ebrahim Ansarin, two planes.

    4 Persian date Ordibehesht 1360 in accordance with the April 24, 1981, Lieutenant Farrokh rooz* , an aircraft.

    Unknown date: 1 hunted Iraqi Super etandard with Ebrahim Ansarin.

    In close combat, using machine guns, 2 aircrafts.

    On two separate occasions, in a stage (with Gen. J. Shokraeii rear cockpit), two aircraft in other conflict (with Abbas Sanat kar rear cockpit),Three aircrafts in very low altitude (fifteen to twenty meters above sea level) crushed into water, without firing from the plane.
     
  2. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    losses of Operation Kaman 99:

    Maj. M. J. Portavan, F-5E, plane destroyed, Pilot Injured.

    Cpt. M. Nazerian, F-5E, plane destroyed, Pilot KIA.

    Cpt. KH. Eshghi Pour & RIO: 1Lt. A. Eslami, F-4E, Plane Destroyed, Both pilots KIA.

    Cpt. D. Yazdanfar* & RIO: 2Lt. F. Rahbar, F-4E, Plane damaged, Both Pilots OK.

    1Lt. GH. Orouji, F-5E, plane destroyed, Pilot KIA.

    1Lt. SH. Oveisi, F-5E, plane destroyed, Pilot Injured.

    1lt. P. Hatamian, F5-E, plane destroyed, pilot POW.

    2Lt. M. Jahanshahloo, F-5E, plane destroyed, Pilot KIA.

    2Lt. T. Yussuf, F-5E, Plane destroyed, pilot POW.

    More info about Operation Kaman 99:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Kaman_99

    Source 1
    Source 2
    Source 3
    Source 4
     
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  3. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper Patron  

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    Hello Tirdad...Welcome.
    Always nice to have visitors from all over the world here.
    Do you know, are Iranian F14's still flying?...Do they machine their own parts or are they able to be bought on the black market
    Are there still Phoenix missiles in inventory?
    Wonder how the F14 stacks up against newer MiG's and SU's.

    What do you think of KSA's pilots and inventory?
     
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  4. green slime

    green slime Member

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    Salaam TIRDAD! hoobi?

    Welcome to the site! I'm sure you have lots of interesting insights on events in Persia over the last 80 years!

    Great topic.
     
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  5. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Thanks for the info, Tirdad. Not a conflict I think we've covered much.
     
  6. green slime

    green slime Member

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    Another little known fact is Iranian helicopter pilots at great personal risk ferried US and British military advisors out of the country during the revolution to the UAE.
     
  7. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    Hello Poppy,

    1- some of them fly in private airliners inside and outside of iran.

    2- they bought on the black market

    3- i have no info.

    4- me too, they were trained years in U.S.A. (by the time, it would be a good reason) .

    5- i have no info.
     
  8. green slime

    green slime Member

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    I think Poppy was referring to the planes, not the pilots, whn he asked if they were still flying.

    Poppy, I believe so; I saw some lined up on the tarmac at Shiraz airport.
     
  9. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    Salaam Green slime, shoma chetori? (How are you?)

    thanks, my first goal is to interduse Army combatanants and their memoirs and ... in Internatsional forums.
     
  10. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    this Operation was named "Nabard-e Zoffar".
     
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  11. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    http://s5.picofile.com/file/8158617776/13611494873841549435.jpg

    in this picture, you see Burnt body of Lt. Alireza Harraaf, IRIAA, Bell 205, KIA: 10.02.1361 (30.04.1982) - Khoramshahr - Operation Bayt -el Muqaddas

    [​IMG]

    Pilot on the right, WO. Qodratollah Khodadadi, IRIAA, Bell 205, RIO of Lt. Harraaf, Dies of Wounds: 14.02.1361 (03.05.1982) - Army Hospital No. 505 - Tehran
     
  12. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper Patron  

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    Great picture there of the 2 pilots on the Cobra wing. ..The load of rockets is interesting.

    Thanks GS... F14 at a civilian airport, damn.
     
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  13. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    F-14 vs MiG-25; A RIO's War Story


    A war story by F-14A RIO Col. Ali M. Rafi'ee


    Date: 23rd of July, 1983

    Taking off in our F-14 Tomcat from the 7th Shiraz air base as that day Combat Air Patrol (CAP) aircraft we were to arrive over the strategic northern Persian Gulf region (NW of Bushehr) and provide daily CAP missions as directed by our SOC (Sector Operation Center). My front seater was Captain (later Brig. Gen) Rostami.

    Right after our take-off and before we could reach our CAP area, the air defense radar controller informed us of the presence of an usually high flying intruder (with an altitude above 65000 feet) that was fast approaching our territory. Since there was no other interceptor in the area to go after the suspected aircraft, we asked the SOC to vector us towards the target. Turning due north I quickly managed to acquire the target on my scope. As we'd suspected It was indeed a Soviet built MiG-25 Foxbat flying high and very fast.

    Captain Rostami went nose up full power using after-burner to reach our maximum speed. Reaching 45000 feet we started getting ready to violently greet the Iraqi MiG-25. Through out the climb I constantly went back and forth with my pilot to arrange for an optimal lock while tracking the Iraqi aircraft using the ever magnificent AWG-9 radar. At an optimal range and distance, the Phoenix missile was launched and I saw the missile being released off our aircraft streaking towards the Iraqi MiG-25.

    It took mere seconds for the missile to hit the poor bastard. Having seen the impact and the fireball in the sky made us rejoice and we couldn't hide our excitement in the cockpit either. Seconds later, the air defense radar confirmed the kill too.

    That day's intercept and successful shoot down of an Iraqi MiG-25 Foxbat in essence put a stop to Iraq's blind bombing of our population centers using their Mig-25s for over a year.
     
  14. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    [​IMG]
    Standing on the right is KIA Captain Bee-Taraf
     
  15. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    [​IMG]
    1Lt. J. Zandi​
     
  16. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    [SIZE=16pt]Fereidoun “Fery” AliMazandarani Biography[/SIZE]
    Fereidoun AliMazandarani (3 October 1951 - ) nicknamed Fery (short for Fereidoun) by his friends and comrades was an Iranian F-14 pilot and considered a fighter Ace during the 8 year Iran-Iraq war claiming as many as nine aerial victories and five indirect ones as a result of enemy aircraft crashes. He was also the head of The Sedjil Project in an effort to fit the surface to air missile, MIM-23 Hawk, to the F-14 Tomcat. He logged in almost 3,000 hours on the F-14 and flew over 540 missions during the war and up to his retirement. During his career, he held posts such as Deputy to the Air Force Operations Intelligence, Air Force Operations & Mission Planning Supervisor and was the armed forces’ representative in the P.O.W. exchange negotiation team. Colonel Fereidoun Ali Mazandarani retired from the IRIAF on March 22, 1999 after serving over 27 years.

    [SIZE=14pt]Early Life[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=12pt]Born on October 3rd, 1951, Fereidoun grew up in a military family. In 1960, his father, a military man serving in The Special Guard Group to the Shah, left for the U.S. to undertake a course related to his specialty. While seeing off his father at the airport, he was mesmerized by the airplanes taking off and landing at Mehrabad Airport, Tehran. At the age of 10, he was so fascinated with the airplanes that his family thought he had returned home by himself as he sat by the terminal window for hours, watching the airplanes. He had already decided then that he would become the person flying those machines. Upon graduation from high school, he immediately took the entrance exam for Iran Air “Homa” Airlines and passed. His friends dared him to take The Imperial Iranian Air Force entrance exam which was said to be much harder than the Homa Airlines. Taking the dare seriously and being a matter of honor, he was one of the few in that group of volunteers who passed the exam and the medical tests. Being from a military family, he changed his mind to attend the flight courses in Homa Airlines and enrolled in The Imperial Iranian Air Force Academy[/SIZE]

    [SIZE=14pt]Professional Career[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=12pt]IIAF[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=12pt]F. AliMazandarani joined the Imperial Iranian Air Force on November 22, 1971 and a year later in December of 1972, he was sent to The United States to complete the “UPT” (Undergraduate Pilot Training) course and become a fighter pilot. He completed his English Language training at Lackland Air Force Base and was one of the first groups to be sent to Medina AFB in San Antonio, Texas, to train on the Cessna T-41 in 1973.[/SIZE]

    [SIZE=12pt][​IMG][/SIZE][SIZE=9pt]Lackland School of Language 1973[/SIZE]

    He was then sent to Laughlin AFB to start academic training and fly with the T-37 & T-38. Among his instructors were Captain J. Kelly, a Vietnam War veteran and one of the top pilots of the F-4 Phantom, who was shot down, captured and later escaped. During his training, Captain Kelly tried to teach additional points outside the designated syllabus, which later became useful to AliMazandarani during Iran-Iraq war.

    [​IMG][SIZE=9pt]Laghlin Air Force Base 1973, AliMazandarani standing first from right[/SIZE]



    He flew his first solo flight with the T-37 on December 7th, 1973, which resulted in an emergency landing. Against his instructor, Capt. J. Kelly, and Laughlin AFB commander’s, Col. Harry Falls, advice to eject, the young cadet decided to land the aircraft when the right main gear failed to open after repeated attempts. He continued his training on the T-38 with Capt. Shwain, one of the experienced F-4 pilots and continued with Lt. Blockland. He finalized his training with squadron commander, Capt. Friski, one of F-4’s skilled pilots and instructors. Fereidoun AliMazandarani got his wings on November 1st, 1974 and returned to Iran.




    [SIZE=12pt]He spent some time in The 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron waiting for the opening of the F-5A & F-5B ground school at the 1st TFB Mehrabad and in January 1975, he left for The 41st Training Squadron in 4th TFB in Dezful. In June 1975 he finalized his tactical training on the F-5A & B and was transferred to the 42nd Tactical Squadron.[/SIZE]






    [SIZE=12pt]In October 1975 he finished his tactical training on the newly imported F-5E & F with the 43rd Training Squadron and was transferred back to the 42nd Tactical Squadron as a fighter pilot on the above fighters and Squadron’s Standardization Officer.[/SIZE]





    In November 1977, he was chosen as one the candidates for the F-14A, the most advanced interceptor fighter jet of its time, after 815 hours of flight time on the F-5 Tiger II. 1st Lt. AliMazandarani was transferred to the 8th TFB in Isfahan to join the 81st Training Squadron. He started training under the direction of Iranian and American instructors and flew his first flight with Capt. Abbas Hazin, another one of the Ace pilots of Iran-Iraq war that shot down a number of Iraqi fighters. Several of the American instructors whom worked for Grumman were based in Isfahan at the time including Mr. Calaway, Mr. Minhold, Mr. Holmberg, Mr. Becker, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Voreck, Mr. Peinemann, Mr. Bero, Mr. Marteney, etc. Also, some of the instructors were from active top pilots in The U.S. Navy that flew the F-14; such as, Maj. Noris, Maj. Stutszman, and Capt. Bouck. The training was under the supervision of former Navy Admiral Chuck Zangs at the time. Again, it was during this time that a few of the instructors like Mr. D. Ewing, Grumman Test Pilot, and Mr. M. Holmberg taught some invaluable flying maneuvers and techniques that could be performed by the F-14 outside of the standardized syllabus that would later become useful to AliMazandarani during the Iran-Iraq war. Lt. AliMazandarani finished his F-14 tactical training on June 14th, 1978 and his flight time on the F-14 had reached 170 hours in 110 sorties by the time the Iran- Iraq war started.

    [​IMG]



    [SIZE=12pt]IRIAF[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=12pt]Between February 1979 and September 22nd, 1980, like any other Air Force Bases, the F-14s were flying with very low frequency due to post revolution chaos resulting in purging of personnel. The 8th TFB in Esfahan was filled with different political leaders and groups which had turned this base into the most political military base in the country as well as creating an undesirable atmosphere in The IRIAF. Amidst the chaos, 1st Lt. AliMazandarani decided to resign from the air force and while the base commander was against his resignation, he managed to obtain travel permission to H.Q. to submit his resignation and receive approval along with two of the other F-14 pilots on September 9th, 1980. The same night after returning home late, he found a letter requesting his presence at 03:30am in 8th TFB’s Command Post. Prior to the official attack of Iraq on September 22nd, 1980, there had been some light exchange of fire alongside the boarder as well as Iraqi fighters bombing border villages and cities in Iranian territory. Upon his arrival to the command post with his colleague Maj. Shahram Rostami, they were briefed by base commander, Col. H. Sadeghpour, of an operation inside Iraqi territory presumably in response to the bombing of Iranian border villages and cities. The plan was to escort a strike group of F-4 fighters, as they bombed a Fighter Base deep into Iraqi territory. The operation was called Sultan (King) later on. Only a few hours later and just before dawn, with military discharge papers in hand awaiting final approval, AliMazandarani took off alone from Esfahan 8th TFB with WSO 2nd Lt. M. Reza BenJavad Talebi. The flight leader, Major Rostami, encountered an engine after burner blow out in both jet engines during takeoff roll leaving AliMazandarani’s F-14 as the only support fighter. It was on the return of this flight that the infamous report of mass Iraqi ground forces behind the border was given by 1st Lt. AliMazandarani and passed on to The Joint Chiefs of Staff. After this operation, 1st Lt. AliMazandarani began flying regularly until September 22nd, when the war officially started. His discharge papers were never signed and approved.[/SIZE]

    [SIZE=12pt][​IMG][/SIZE]

    [SIZE=9pt]F. AliMazandarani after H3 Mission Visiting the Supreme Leader of Iran Aiatollaah Khomeini[/SIZE]




    [SIZE=12pt]The Tomcats had increased patrol and needed aerial refueling during the day as well as night; however, the night aerial refueling of the F-14 had not been done by the Americans or the Iranians till that time. The 72nd squadron based in 7th TFB, Shiraz was responsible to work on this project; however, on September 14th, 1980, 1st Lt. F. AliMazandarani & Maj. Mohammad Hashem Ale-Agha acting as WSO, successfully managed to refuel at night in one of their night scramble missions and practiced both dry & wet contacts up to 40 times. Upon return, although Maj. Ale-Agha was an IPSO (instructor), however since the flight was not a training mission, 1st Lt. Ali Mazandarani as the commander of the F-14 was reprimanded by Col. H. Sadeghpour, the base commander, for performing action against regulations. But when Col. Javad Fakouri, The IRIAF Commander, was informed of the incident, he immediately ordered to schedule all active pilots in Isfahan Air Base for night refueling check, as well as expunging 1st Lt. AliMazandarani’s reprimand from his personnel file.[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=12pt]Three days later, 1st Lt. Fereidoun AliMazandarani, accompanied by WSO 2nd Lt. Ghasem Sultani, fired his first Phoenix missile with enough overtake from 11 Milles in trail of an Iraqi fighter, a MIG- 23 Flogger, and shot it down over the city of Mehran. This would be the first ever fired Phoenix missile in pursuit of an enemy fighter instead of the standard head on firing profile. On September 25th, he and WSO 2nd Lt. Hassan Najafi flying at an altitude of 24,000 feet and a range of 40Km fired two Phoenix missiles simultaneously downing two Iraqi fighters flying below 100 feet near the city of Yasoudj. One of the pilots ejected after seeing his comrade struck, crushing both elbows during ejection due to his haste.[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=12pt]1st Lt. AliMazandarani and WSO 2nd Lt. Ghasem Sultani provided air cover at the border for four F-4E Phantoms on September 30th, when they attacked and bombed Osirak Nuclear Plant successfully. On November 13th, 1980 he got into an intense dogfight with a Mig-23. Both skilled pilots tried to get each other in their respected gun sight and in a proficient display of aerial combat, both aircrafts started descending from 24,000 feet at high speed in a tight spiral scissor like maneuver. 1st Lt. AliMazandarani requested repeated altitude check and an alert at 300 feet above ground level from his WSO, 2nd Lt. Yousef Ahmadi, as he only managed to fire two bursts of gun, while the Iraqi pilot skillfully dodged the 20mm rounds. Once they hit 300 feet, AliMazandarani pulled up and inverted his aircraft observing the Mig-23 smash into the ground before the formidable adversary had a chance to eject. He later requested from the search and rescue team to check the identity of the Iraqi pilot only to find out his rank, a Major, possibly one of the Squadron Commanders of Al-Shoeibieh Base in Iraq. [/SIZE]
    [SIZE=12pt]On November 30th, another two Iraqi fighters were shot down while 2nd Lt. Ebrahim Ansareen acted as his WSO over Khor Mosa in The Persian Gulf, firing two Phoenix missiles. April 24th, 1981 flying with WSO 1st Lt. M. FarrokhNazar, they shot down an Iraqi fighter using their Phoenix missile. In February of 1984, he and WSO 2nd Lt. M. Sezavar Shokouh shot down a Mirage using guns in Northeast of Boubian Island. On March 24th, 1985, while flying with limited amount of fuel (Bingo Fuel), he and his WSO, 1st Lt. Abbas Sanatkar, were ordered to engage 13 aircrafts heading for the numerous loaded oil tankers anchored next to Kharq Island in The Persian Gulf. Outnumbered and low on fuel, they managed to defeat several incoming air to air missiles launched from the escort fighters causing the bombers to drop their load in the water, break formation and return frantically with their escorts. Not being able to pursue the enemy due to extremely low fuel, they returned to hook up with the B-707 tanker. As a result of this engagement at altitudes below 50 Ft over the water, it was discovered later by the listening posts that 3 out of 13 aircrafts, 2 Mirage F-1EQs & 1 Mig-27, never made it back, most likely crashing into the water. [/SIZE]

    [SIZE=12pt]During the war, Iraq had devised a few tactics to shoot down Iranian F-14 Tomcats. One of these methods was attacking from several directions with multiple aircrafts. For this type of strategy, the Iraqis would usually use the Mirage F-1EQ and its modern Super Matra air to air missiles, known to the Iranian pilots as the “Red Head” to hunt the F-14s. During Capt. AliMazandarani’s annual stand check flight and CAP mission southwest of Kharq Island area, he and WSO Maj. Javad Shokraei, an F-14 IP (instructor) himself, encountered two groups of three and two Iraqi fighters coming towards them from two different directions. Flying below 50 ft over The Persian Gulf and at a speed of 690 Knots, they engaged the fighters when they realized that the Master Arm Switch had failed. At the same time the Iraqi fighters had fired six Super Matra missiles towards them. Defenseless, the F-14 had no choice but to perform hard and extensive maneuvers to defeat the missiles. Finally, one of fighters, a Mirage F-1EQ, was seen by the crew to hit the water and shortly after, the rest fled back to their base. On the way back to the base, they were advised by radar and ELINT posts that only 3 out of 5 aircrafts had returned, indicating a second loss of an Iraqi fighter. However, as a result of these maneuverings and high G turns of up to 11.5Gs, Capt. AliMazandarani cracked his helmet from hitting the canopy and ripped his G-Suit due to sudden turns. Maj. Shokraii suffered neck injury from checking their six o’clock during the maneuvers and had to wear a neck brace for six months after this flight. After retiring, AliMazandarani was forced to perform two extensive knee surgeries on both his knees, minor surgery on his wrists and a heart surgery. Later he lost motor function on the right side of his body that required spinal surgery and a protease implant in his cervical spine, mainly to this and a few other CAP missions. The crew was not the only casualty of this flight. Non-destructive Inspection, NDI, analysis of the F-14 showed 19 cracks and fractures on the longitudinal axis of the aircraft which put the aircraft out of service for almost two years. [/SIZE]
    [SIZE=12pt]In early 1987, due to shortage of Phoenix missile coolants & batteries, the IRIAF was in search of suitable and reliable air to air missiles. As a result, Project SEDJIL was initiated. The team, directed by Maj. AliMazandarani, was tasked to find the proper weapon in the Iranian Armed Forces and the MIM-23 Hawk surface to air missile was chosen for this purpose.[/SIZE]

    [SIZE=12pt]Upon the completion of the program, the final test was to be performed on enemy aircraft as a live test and in a real combat scenario. As a result, after 3 days of alert status, Maj. F. AliMazandarani, scrambled his F-14 from Busher AFB with his Sedjil teammate, WSO 1st Lt. E. Ansareen, and headed towards the targets over The Persian Gulf. The first missile failed as the ground crew had loaded a bad rocket used for the initial tests on his F-14. Quickly the target was reacquired by radar and locked on. The second Hawk missile (renamed Sedjil) was fired at a range of 20 miles striking its target dead on. The downed fighter was later confirmed to be the French made Super Etendard that was able to carry the infamous Exocet anti ship missiles. After the successful operational test, it was immediately ordered to equip several of the F-14s with the modified MIM-23 missile, renamed SEDJIL.[/SIZE]

    http://rahrovan-artesh.ir/index.php?/topic/918-sedjil-project-aim23-missile/



    [SIZE=12pt]Col. Fereidoun AliMazandarani flew over 540 sorties and logged in over 2,800 hours of flight time during the 8 year Iran-Iraq war up to his retirement; a total of over 650 sorties and almost 3,000 hours on the F-14.[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=12pt]Besides being a fighter pilot, he had been assigned to several other responsibilities during the war period and post war period.[/SIZE]

    [SIZE=12pt][​IMG][/SIZE][SIZE=9pt]Return of P.O.W. fighter pilots[/SIZE]



    [SIZE=12pt]These responsibilities included supervising the affairs of the air force personnel (K.I.A., P.O.W. and Veterans) from Jan. 1981 to November 1995, active duty in Operations Training Management, Air Force Operations & Mission Planning Supervisor, Biweekly, alternate operation flights, between Isfahan, Shiraz, Bushehr and Omidiyeh AFBs until the end of the war and afterwards, Special Investigator to some of the air force aircraft accidents during the war, air force permanent representative in the “POW Support Committee”, Armed Forces representative in POW exchange negotiation team, Deputy to the MIA Committee of Joint Chiefs of Staff, Deputy to the Air Force Operations Intelligence (Nov.1995-Mar.1999), the establish, setup and running of Safat Airlines and chairman of the board of directors from 1993-1999.[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=12pt]Colonel Fereidoun AliMazandarani served the air force for 27 years and 4 months and was retired from The IRIAF 32 months sooner than the 30 year norm, on March 22nd, 1999.[/SIZE]
     
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  17. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    It depicts the first four Iranian aviators who went to US for training in the F-14 Tomcats back in 1974.
    There are from left Khorram, Zanganeh, Heydarizadeh and Farahavar.
    Enjoy!
     
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  18. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    Iran's Army Aviation Units at War; A War Story

    A war story by AH-1J Cobra pilot Colonel Reza Moghadami (retired):

    It was the beginning of the war with Iraq. Up to 16 Iraqi army divisions had attacked Iran in late September and we were just a few months into the imposed war.

    As a Cobra pilot I had been posted to the southern front. And on one cold autumn day we were ordered to attack Hill 12 in order to evict Iraqi forces from that strategic hill deep inside our territories.

    Three AH-1J Attack Helicopters and one Bell-214A were tasked to attack the hill while covering the ground forces who were undertaking the actual offensive. Our AH-1J Cobra helicopters were equipped with deadly TOW missiles. Our temporary staging base was the famed 4th Vahdati Iranian Air Force Base near the city of Dezful. Our courageous and unarmed B-214 crew included a medic/PJ and a rescue team who would spring into action if any one of our attack helicopter crews got shot down or needed immediate rescue.

    Following a westerly route we continued towards the ancient city of Shoosh (Susa in the province of Khuzestan). Minutes later, we could visually identify Iraqi armored vehicles that were spread over the hill and the surrounding areas. As soon as they saw us, a barrage of fire came our way. My rather inexperienced 'gunner' in the front seat was none other than 'Warrant Officer' Hasanzadeh, who had never been in an actual shooting war. So I pointed the armored vehicles and tanks to him and instructed him to launch our rockets and missiles. He hesitated and I began yelling at him through the IC (intercom). I ended up begging him. "Hassan, why are you not firing the damn rockets man?"

    The two other Cobras were busy picking out enemy vehicles one by one. And the Iraqis were busy returning fire as well.

    I shouted angrily: "Hassan, did you fall asleep at the switch?" And Hassan moaning and crying over the intercom told me that he is actually hit. He showed me his bloody hands and told me he can't do anything as he is bleeding profusely.

    I thought he was joking. I couldn't believe it. But I had to be calm as the person responsible for the aircraft. I radioed our rescue helicopter and told them that my gunner is injured and that I have to withdraw. I quickly landed a few miles away. The PJ in the rescue helicopter that had landed beside us, ran over to our side to render assistance to my injured gunner. I lifted off as soon as my gunner was safely loaded onto the rescue chopper. On my way back to the staging area I was sad and angry. Sad that I had yelled angrily at my teammate and angry for not inflicting any damage against the enemy tanks. My gunner was so badly injured that he'd to be evacuated to the main army hospital in Tehran. Doctors feared he'd be paralyzed for the rest of his life.

    This freak incident reminded me of an earlier incident in which my helicopter was hit by an Iraqi anti-aircraft gun and my pilot was injured. In both instances luck and Karma had come to my rescue. I had managed to survive.
     
  19. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    very rare photo from zoffar war:

    From R to L:

    Reza Tabanfar - Hormoz Marefat - Dariush Jalali - Hasan Vaezi - Mahmood gheidian
     
  20. TIRDAD

    TIRDAD Active Member

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    Cpt. KHodabakhsh EshghiPoor - F-4E - Operation Kaman 99

    [​IMG]

    1Lt. Abbas Eslami - F-4E - Operation Kaman 99
     

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