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Japanese WWII Paratroopers Weapons

Discussion in 'Japanese Light Weapons' started by Jim, Oct 20, 2007.

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  1. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    All paratroopers jumped with an 8mm semi-automatic pistol, either the Type 94, 1934 #1, or Type 14, 1925 #2; a Meiji Type 30, 1897 bayonet with 15Y in blade #3; and at least two HE grenades, Type 97 1937 #4 or Type 99 1939 #5. The 21b 11 oz Type 99, 1939 magnetic anti-armour charge #6, used for attacking tanks and the steel doors and shutters of pillboxes, was issued in a pouch, with the fuse/detonator packed inside in a two-piece metal tube; the fuse was screwed into the 99 hako-bakurai, and the igniter struck against a solid object to initiate a 10-second delay. The IJN initially used the 6.5mm Meiji Type 38 (1905 carbine #7. Modified “take-down” tera rifles for paratroopers first appeared in 1942/43. A 1941 prototype of the Type 38 carbine with a hinged butt proved too fragile to be adopted. The first IJA attempt to develop a rifle that could be carried on the jump was the 7.7mm Type 100 1940 - the Type 99 short rifle modified with a detachable barrel; the locking mechanism was inadequate, and only small numbers were issued. An improved purpose-made version was adopted as the Type 2, 1942 #8, #9 & #10 in May 1943, and was widely issued to IJA and IJN parachute units from late 1943. Take-down rifles were carried on the jump either in a canvas chest bag, or separated in two leg bags lowered on a short rope after the parachute opened. The Type 1, 1941 paratrooper bandoleer #11, of canvas and leather, was worn around the lower torso; it had seven pockets each holding two five-round rifle charger clips, and two grenade pockets - grenades were carried upside down, so leather bottom extensions accommodated the fuses.

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  2. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    Paratroopers’ Weapons 2

    The standard 7.7mm Type 99 (1939) LMG, which already had a detachable quick-change barrel, was provided with a detachable shoulder stock and hollow forward-folding pistol grip; this model came into use in1943 #1, #2. At 46’/ in long, this weighed 231b, took 30-round box magazines, and had a rate of fire of 850rpm. Few sub-machine guns were initially used, but larger numbers were issued for the deployments to the Philippines in 1944; although they were not listed on organization tables, a Takachiho paratrooper veteran stated that they had about 100 per regiment. Three versions of the 8mm Type 100 (1940) were employed. The original 1940 version #3, which already had a detachable barrel, was modified in 1942 with a folding stock and the removal of the flash hider #4a, #4b; length was 34in, or 22.2in folded; weight, 7lb; and rate of fire, 450rpm. The much altered 1944 version #5, without a folding stock, weighed 81 lb, measured 36in, and fired at 850rpm. All used 30-round magazines. The Type 100 bayonet issued with the SMG had an 8in blade #6. The 5cm Type 89 (1929) grenade discharger #7 - popularly but mistakenly called a “knee mortar” by Allied troops - weighed 10.31b; a 1943 paratroop version had a detachable base plate #8, although the standard model base plate and firing mechanism could already be unscrewed and reversed inside the barrel for compact carrying. This valuable weapon fired HE #9a or WP #9b shells out to 700yds, and Type 91 1931) hand grenades fitted with propellant charges #9c to 200yds; a range of smoke and pyrotechnic rounds included this 3-star red flare #9d. The discharger was carried in a canvas case slung from the shoulder, and paratroopers were provided with a chest pack. Some IJA officers carried 3.5cm Taisho Type 10 (1921) flare pistols #10; the IJN used the 2.8cm Type 97 (1937) #11. The IJN 17-pocket paratroop bandoleer is shown at #12.

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  3. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    A "Japanese paratrooper" actually, a Japanese-American Nisei - models the jump pack for the disassembled Type 100 sub-machine gun. It is attached to the harness D-rings intended for the chest reserve pack, which was judged unnecessary for low-altitude combat jumps.

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    The Arisaka 7.7mm Type 2 (1942) "take-down" rifle, issued from 1943; note the brass muzzle cover. Most Type 2s had a monopod fitted to the forearm, but it has been removed from this example. The unsatisfactory Type 100, which the Type 2 replaced, had lacked the prominent locking pin on the right side of the stock, and the breech portion extending from the barrel was polished. Both rifles were 44in long and weighed just over 81b 9oz; all
    Japanese bolt-action rifles had 5-round fixed magazines.

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  4. AzraelValley

    AzraelValley New Member

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    We used to have a bayonet in our house, but I can’t find it now. I wonder where it is. My father told me when I was a little boy that my grandfather killed a Japanese soldier and took the bayonet as his own.
     
  5. tom!

    tom! recruit

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    Hi.

    Special paratroop weapons

    Type 100 TERA Rifle with demountable barrel
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    Type 1 TERA Rifle with foldable buttstock
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    Type 2 TERA Rifle with demountable barrel
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    Type 99 LMG paratroop version demounted
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    Type 100 SMG paratroop Version
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    Type 99 8 cm Short Mortar
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    Experimental 37 mm Low-Angle Infantry Gun Raku
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    Experimental 7 cm Battalion Gun
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    Yours

    tom! ;)
     

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