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Kenneth Glynn

Discussion in 'WWII Era Obituaries (non-military service)' started by GRW, Dec 2, 2014.

  1. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    From The Guardian-
    "Our father, Kenneth Glynn, who has died aged 94, was a life-long socialist and peace campaigner. He was also an exceptional TRADE[​IMG]unionist who used argument, logic and evidence to win better conditions for his members.
    Kenneth achieved these successes from 1960 as general secretary of the Society of Post Office Executives (SPOE). He won case after case through negotiation and arbitration with the Post Office and later with British Telecommunications. Between 1960 and 1980 the number of telephones used in the UK trebled. Many of those overseeing the planning of this expansion were members of SPOE. Despite having had no previous tradition as organised labour, they subsequently enjoyed above-inflation pay increases and better conditions without resorting to the industrial action so characteristic of those two decades.
    Bert Thomas, one-time SPOE president, wrote that Kenneth “was capable of cutting through the dross encapsulating the problem to size its soul, and then applying his outstanding powers of concentration and application until the solution was clear.” Over this period, membership of the union swelled from 5,500 to 23,000 and through Kenneth’s urging it became affiliated to the TUC.
    Son of Edwin, a coal-miner, and his wife, Ada, Kenneth was born in Conisbrough, Yorkshire. He won a scholarship to Doncaster grammar school and from there went to King’s College London to read history. His degree course was shortened to just two years because of the second world war. As a conscientious objector he spent the war in the London Fire Brigade."
    http://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2014/dec/02/kenneth-glynn-obituary
     

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