Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Look who's back...

Discussion in '☆☆ New Recruits ☆☆' started by George Patton, Sep 7, 2022.

  1. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    4,965
    Likes Received:
    1,950
    Location:
    God's Country
    So, George is now the proud owner of an M-113, kewl! I'm not completely familiar with the stuff on top, an Australian variant perhaps?
     
  2. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Messages:
    3,202
    Likes Received:
    1,158
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Its a Canadian variant. M113A3-type vehicle (with some specific canadian modifications, but close enough to a US spec one), with a twin machine gun turret from Cadillac-Gage added. The turret holds an M2 and FN MAG. The modifications were done in the mid 2000s. Canada still had several hundred in active use last time I checked. They use a continuous rubber-band type track which I'll admit is quieter and smoother than the traditional pin/link style track.

    Canada also lengthened some M113s to add an extra road wheel and increase troop capacity. I may have one of those kicking around too. The lengthened ones have a more aggressive engine tune and accelerate faster.

    The Aussies had a similar M113 platform vehicle with a small turret which was called the M113AS4. Similar purpose (vehicle defense without the need to expose the crew or infantry to enemy fire) but its an unrelated development dating to the 90s.
     
    Slipdigit likes this.
  3. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    4,965
    Likes Received:
    1,950
    Location:
    God's Country
    The US still had a bunch of M-113's during the mid-2000's. When my older son was in Iraq in 2007, they had an M-113 used to medivac a seriously wounded Marine.
    The unit was patrolling in Fallujah and came upon what appeared to be a large IED. When they stopped to investigate an insurgent sniper shot their Sergeant, initiating a full-fledged ambush and firefight. The round entered near the sergeant's armpit and bounced off the front, rear and side ESAPI plates (Enhanced Small Arms Protective Insert) shredding his internal organs. The platoon was heavily engaged and fought back the insurgents while the Corpsman cut the sergeant open, stabilized a rib through his lung, packed his internal organs with gauze, and tried to save the now unconscious Marine. They called in a medivac helicopter, but the enemy fire was too intense for them to land. The US Army scrambled an M-113 ambulance from a field hospital, it entered the firefight and extracted the wounded Marine, taking him to a secure area where a medivac helo could fly him out. After they turfed the turds, they found out the sergeant had died several times but was resuscitated and flown out to Germany, and eventually back to the US.

    From a newspaper story on the sergeant (name redacted to preserve his privacy):
    "While on patrol in Fallujah, Iraq a sniper’s bullet ripped through his chest collapsing both of his lungs, shredding half of his intestines and stomach, damaging about seventy percent of his liver and shattering his right rib cage. While in the field his Corpsman began battle field surgery to save his life. Without anesthesia his Corpsman began cutting open the side of his chest to remove the rib that was puncturing his lung and used chest muscles to hold it in place. J....n was flown out of the field shortly after the fire fight that enraged around his platoon. After flat lining four times and over forty surgeries later he awoke from his medically induced coma in Bethesda, MD at the National Naval Medical Center. After being told he wouldn’t make it and almost a year of recovery he found himself surrounded by loved ones and looking to help other Wounded Warriors."

    The M-113 has served the US and her allies well since first seeing combat in 1962, production didn't stop until 2007 and the US Army still has thousands serving. You did good! A more iconic vehicle would be hard to name, a freakin' Sherman and an M-113 that is impressive!
     
    Owen, George Patton and GRW like this.
  4. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    7,824
    Likes Received:
    1,854
    That Corpsman better Never pay for a drink or meal again ! Sweet Jesus balls of steel.
     
  5. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    4,965
    Likes Received:
    1,950
    Location:
    God's Country
    Unfortunately, he struggled with PTSD, I think he had three pumps to Iraq, counting the 2007 deployment, including the big 2004 Fallujah fight. He was self-medicating with alcohol and struggling with suicidal thoughts and checked into the base hospital at Quantico. He killed himself overnight, in the hospital, less than a year after coming back. It crushed the Marines he served with; everyone loved him. We were afraid his suicide was going to lead to a spate of others because it hit everyone so hard, but I'm only aware of one other. I know a bunch of the Marines had the combat camera "Phantom Fury" video that they'd gotten from him, so he may have been with 3/1 in Fallujah.

     
    George Patton likes this.
  6. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Messages:
    3,202
    Likes Received:
    1,158
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Several of the M113s which are now sitting in my garage served in Afghanistan with the Canadian Army. The Army launched a program to update the venerable M113 platform to better cope with the IED threat. This resulted in a so-called "Ops" configuration. The M113, having a flat bottom and being of relatively light weight, is prone to severe damage by IEDs. Canada replaced the old bench seats with individual seats mounted from the roof, with 5-point harnesses and shock absorbers to lessen the likelihood of serious injury to the crew. It was a great idea and from what I can tell seems to be effective. I don't think the US ever did a similar modification. Another modification was the addition of heat exchangers for cooling vests (supposedly an idea taken from the US Stykers IFVs in the aftermath of OIF).

    I have to say that the M113 is the most fun military vehicle I've ever driven. The ease of driving (essentially a yoke for steering, a brake pedal, and throttle pedal, so it will drive wherever you point it), coupled with an incredible degree of responsiveness and an exceptional power-to-weight ratio mean driving is both exceptionally effortless and remarkably controllable. I hate to say this but if I want to have some fun I'd certainly take an M113 over the Sherman any day!

    I'd be honored to host you and your son if you ever find yourselves north of the border.
     
    Slipdigit and USMCPrice like this.
  7. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    4,965
    Likes Received:
    1,950
    Location:
    God's Country
    Hopefully one day we can work it out. You've always been a good dude (one of my favorites on the forum), and it would be an honor to meet you.
     

Share This Page