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M1 Garand .30-06 Semi Automatic Rifle

Discussion in 'Allied Light Weapons' started by Spitfire XIV-E, Aug 14, 2007.

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  1. Spitfire XIV-E

    Spitfire XIV-E New Member

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    The M1 Garand rifle was developed by Springfield designer John Garand. It was the first Semi-Automatic weapon issued en masse to troops anywhere in the world. Gradually refined through the 1920's & 30's it was finally accepted into service with the US Army in 1936 by executive order of then Chief of Staff, General Douglas McArthur. It was proof tested in 1937 and was then issued in limited numbers by Springfield. However with the start of the war in Europe production was stepped up and a new production contract was issued to Winchester Repeating Arms Company in New Haven, Connecticut. Winchester made Garands being produced from 1941 - 1945. By the time the US went to war in December 1941 most US Infantry Units were equipped with the Garand. It gave US Troops a marked advantage over some of the slower German & Japanese bolt action weapons. The only disadvantage being when a new clip had to be inserted to re-load. The clip held 8 rounds and it was also used as a Sniper Rifle. The Garand saw service in Korea and also to a limited extent in Vietnam.


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    M1 Garand
     
  2. l00ky

    l00ky New Member

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    these rifle`s have done a great service to the u.s army.the sniper rifle was of great use while the enemies were invading a town.The sniper could easily take the enemies down one at a time without being seen
     
  3. anirban3598

    anirban3598 New Member

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    The Garand is loaded with a full clip of 8 cartridges. Once all eight rounds are expended, the bolt will be automatically locked back and the clip ejected, readying the rifle for the insertion of a fresh clip of ammunition. Once the clip is inserted, the bolt snaps forward on its own as soon as pressure is released from the clip, chambering a round and leaving it ready to fire. The M1's safety is located at the front of the trigger guard. It is engaged when it is pressed rearward into the trigger guard, and disengaged when it is pushed forward and is protruding outside of the trigger guard.

    The sniper versions were modified to accept scope mounts, and two versions (the M1C, formerly M1E7, and the M1D, formerly M1E8) were produced, but not in significant quantities during World War II.[39] The only difference between the two versions is the mounting system for the telescopic sight.
     
  4. 10cents

    10cents New Member

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    Hi!

    My great uncles fondly remember this rifle. It was still fairly common 20 years and I remember playing with clips (no ammo) when I was a kid. Now I barely see this legend. Even in parade grounds, it's been replaced by m14s and m16s.

    Like all legends, stories grew around it too, like it could shoot straight through a coconut trunk. I learned later a 30-06 can't do that.

    The Italians later modified it for their use (re-chambered for .308)...

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    Neat, huh?
     

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