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Marie Louise Dissard

Discussion in 'Women at War' started by Jim, Apr 19, 2007.

  1. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    Marie Louise Dissard was born in Toulouse in 1880. When France surrendered to Germany in 1940 Dissard joined the French Resistance.

    At first Dissard worked under Ian Garrow, a soldier in the British Army, who had missed the Dunkirk evacuation and remained in France where he arranged an escape route over the Pyrenees. Although based in Toulouse it had key stations in Paris, Marseilles and Perpignan.

    In October, 1941 Garrow was captured and imprisoned. Albert Guerisse took over at head of the network and when he was arrested, Dissard became the new leader.

    As an elderly woman, the Gestapo did not suspect Dissard was a member of the French Resistance. She was able to travel around France to arrange for Allied airmen to get back to England. This involved escorting them to Toulouse where she arranged their lodgings. They were then moved to Perpignan where they were handed over to the Pyrenees guides.

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    In January 1944, one of the guides was arrested in Perpignan. Contrary to the rules of the network he was carrying a notebook that contained Dissard's name. She was now forced into hiding and lived in a variety of attics, cellars and garages in Toulouse until France was liberated.

    During the Second World War Dissard arranged for over 250 Allied airmen to return to England. Of these, 110 were helped while the Gestapo were looking for her in 1944. After the war Marie Louise Dissard was awarded the American Medal of Freedom.
     
  2. Kelly War44

    Kelly War44 New Member

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    Inspirational. I'll never tire of these stories about seemingly everyday people who turn out to be 'True Heroes'. Remarkable.
     
  3. Cabel1960

    Cabel1960 recruit

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    A 60 year Grandmother joinging the resistance is remarkable and shows the spirt that these people had during their occupation time.
     
  4. Dave War44

    Dave War44 Member

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    Hear, hear, good posts all round.

    Hi Stalin it's good to see you posting, welcome to the forums. That's some hefty nick you've chosen mate ! :eek:
     
  5. Shadow War44

    Shadow War44 New Member

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    It just goes to show that not all the French were cowards. I know the American impression of the French is that we pulled their bacon out of the fire in two wars, which we did. However let us not forget that there were many brave men and women that did resist the Nazi Machine at their own peril.
     
  6. Buford

    Buford New Member

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    A woman of 60 joining the Resistance....it beggars belief.
     
  7. hummingbird42256

    hummingbird42256 New Member

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    It is good to see that women played a part in wwII even though it would seem it was not a popular thing back then to do. Keep the stories coming guys.I will be back to read them all.:thumb:
     
  8. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    Yes we look at these Women today no different than we would had it been a Man, why was it looked on in those days as thou the Women were interfering with a Mans role? Some of the tasks these Women did during the War are well documented today,and so they should be. I know for a fact that some Men i know today would not be putting their hands up for this type of work :wtf:
     
  9. LeighA

    LeighA New Member

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    Well as a woman today I don't know if I would have the guts to do it, but it is very inspiring thay you post these stories on here about truly great people.
     
  10. wallstreeterww

    wallstreeterww New Member

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    Now this what is called a real woman, in the old fashioned mold. Her children and friends must have been very proud of her. I salute her:).
     
  11. katharina

    katharina New Member

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    To finish this story, this spunky and brave lady lived more than a decade after the end of the war and died in 1957. I agree with the poster who said she didn't know if she'd have the guts to do it... same for me. Very inspiring. :thumb:
     
  12. eireann

    eireann New Member

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    Certainly with stories like these it is impossible to blame the fall of France on the overall French mentality, as if it's a cultural factor. If you see the patriotism in the French today, and look back at the people of the Resistance, you actually see many similarities.
     

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