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Meet Australia's deadliest soldier...

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by CAC, Jun 25, 2018.

  1. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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  2. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

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    Respectfully, I believe the title of Australia's "toughest soldier" is held by Keith Payne. Victoria Cross, Order of Australia, US Distinguished Service Cross, US Silver Star.

    Keith Payne - Wikipedia

    [​IMG]
     
  3. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Wiki doesn't do his performance justice..it was worse than they make out. What a role model.

    Years later, asked whether he was afraid, Payne replied, "My God yes, yes, I was”.

    [​IMG]

    Toughest...probably...deadliest? Probably not.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2018
  4. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large Patron  

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    While the link to the article used the phrase "meet Australia's deadliest soldier", in the actual article, the headline and first line don't mention "deadliest" but toughest. For that I'd say Warrant Officer Payne has a pretty good claim.

    Meet Sergeant Paul Cale, Australia’s toughest soldier
    SERGEANT Paul Cale is one of Australia’s toughest soldiers. Here’s what life is like when you’re tasked with killing terrorists for a living.

    As for the article, it's really not vey good, more a fluff piece along the lines of the Guardian, UK. I think journalism is in serious decline. Other than a passing mention of the strangling of a taliban leader, and where he shot the dude with the cell phone that he thought was involved in the IED attack, they don't really provide enough detail to support their contention. I do like that the Australian military has him teaching martial arts, you have a tendency to pay closer attention to an instuctor that's actually killed someone with their hands.

    I also think the journalist was trying to push an agenda. Why even include the lttle drib about Mahmood Fazal and his documentary on violence? Is Cale particularly violent or is fighting a bunch of religious zealots that rape little boys, oppress women, and maintain control over the populace using intimidation and murder not an adequate reason for fighting someone?
    Was it TV and video games that made Cale the killer he is? Is he really much different from thousands of other troops in the number and manner of enemies he has killed? Was it his rough neighborhood, his being raised by a family at the lower end of the economic ladder? Was it his being bullied? It's all a bit melodramatic.
    Hell, they had a Marine take a machinegun away from a taliban and beat him to death with it. There was no reporting on what traumatic events from his childhood led to his violent actions. He beat him to death because the mo'fo was trying to kill him. Simple and sweet. Interestingly, they made that Marine a martial arts instructor as well. His childhood economic situation, TV or video game violence, abuse, bullying; nothing of this nature was ever speculated about in the press. What was addressed was the situation he found himself in and how he resolved it, although violently (beating the bitch to death with his own weapon). Violence is the expected reaction to the situation he found himself in, it is not a flaw created by some event or situation in his childhood as the news.com.au article seems to infer. Some natural proclivity for violence was never suggested for that Marine.

    Marine who fought off ambush awarded Navy Cross


    "Sgt. Clifford Wooldridge, of Port Angeles, Wash., was honored for his actions on June 18, 2010. He served with 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment in the Musa Qalah area of Helmand Province.

    Woolridge and fellow Marines were driving on patrol when they were attacked. After exiting his vehicle, Woolridge led a fire team to outflank the enemy. They killed or wounded eight fighters and started to leave after the rest of the insurgents scattered, the Marine Corps said.

    Woolridge heard voices behind a nearby wall and went to investigate. He “found himself face-to-face with two Taliban fighters, whom he then killed with his weapon. Out of ammunition, Wooldridge crouched to reload his weapon when he saw the barrel of a Taliban machine gun appear from around the corner of the wall.

    “Wooldridge grabbed the barrel and pulled the surprised fighter around the corner with it,” a Marine Corps summary of action says.

    Woolridge, a 220-pound former football player, ended up in hand-to-hand combat with the insurgent. When the enemy fighter tried to pull the pin on a grenade to kill them both, Woolridge grabbed the insurgent’s machine gun and used it to beat him to death. "


    Copyright © 2018, The San Diego Union-Tribune
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2018
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  5. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Note that the first line quoted above says "one of" which isn't in the headline. Changes the meaning quite a bit.
     

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