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MG 34 & MG 42 Machine Guns

Discussion in 'German Light Weapons' started by Jim, Sep 16, 2006.

  1. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    Because of the cheapness, simplicity and ease of its manufacture the MG42 was one of the most remarkable light machine guns ever made. Like the MG34 it was designed as a general purpose machine gun capable of being adapted to the role of light, medium or anti-aircraft machine gun-and consequently suffered from the common defects invariably associated with all multi-purpose equipments, with a very high repeated rate of fire, desirable enough in any anti-aircraft weapon, it was wasteful of ammunition when used in a ground role.
    MG 42 in its LMG role

    [​IMG]

    In many ways this weapon typifies the efficiency of the German small arms industry. On the battlefield it gained fame and respect, and many British and American wartime soldiers will have vivid memories of the chilling rattle of its bursts of fire. However, it never completely superseded the MG 34.


    Basic Data

    Calibre: 7.92mm
    Feed: Metal belt containing 50 rounds
    MY: 2.500--3.000 f/s
    Bullet weight: 154 grains
    Length of gun: 4ft
    Weight: 25lb with bipod
    Sights: V backsight, 200-2000 metres
    Range: Effective range 2,000 yards, on bipod 3.800 yards; maximum range 5,800 yards (15,OOOft in AA role)
    N.B.-These ranges are those claimed by the Germans. By Allied standards the maximum effective range would be considered to be no more than 1,500 yards
    Method of Operation: Recoil
    Type of fire: Automatic only
    Cyc1ic rate of fire: 900-1.200rpm
    Cooling: Air

    Like the MG 34, its predecessor, this gun is operated on the short recoil principle, assisted by a muzzle recoil booster. One unique feature of the gun is its novel locking system, in the two locking studs in the bolt head.
     
  2. Spitfire XIV-E

    Spitfire XIV-E New Member

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    Maybe a bit wasteful but still feared & respected by many allied soldiers. In the hands of a good gunner this weapon could be devastating to frontal assaults. Omaha Beach on D-Day was a good example of the MG42's effectiveness ...
     
  3. Spitfire XIV-E

    Spitfire XIV-E New Member

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    Mg 34

    Here are some pictures of the MG34 which the MG42 was based on. The MG34 was considered expensive to manufacture because of it's many milled and machined parts. The MG42 therefore used many Stamped Parts in it's construction to cut down on costs and time to manufacture although there was still never enough of them.



    [​IMG]


    German Infantry carrying an MG34 in Poland, 1939.
     
  4. Irish Danny

    Irish Danny New Member

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    The Mg42's stunningly high rate of fire would put at least 5 shots into a man when he was hit (considering that the mg42 could fire more than 20 rounds a second). If a man found himself in front of a firing Mg42 in a range under 200 ft the machinegunner wouldn't even have to aim...
     

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