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Old knuckles

Discussion in 'Small Arms and Edged Weapons' started by webby123, Sep 9, 2015.

  1. webby123

    webby123 New Member

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    Hi guys, found these in my grandfathers belongings when he passed away - he served with the staffordshire regiment during 1940 - 44 before he was invalided out of active service, i understand they may be illegal but they will be staying in my house as a keep sake only, i think theyre made from steel and condition is ok if not a little worn, would love to know the history of these, as i grew up i remember him telling me many stories of his time spent abroad etc although he never mentioned these iron knuckles, any help would be greatful - thanks in advance - John View attachment 22957
     

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  2. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Have you tried researching what appear to be makers marks in the lower corners?
     
  3. 15thusinfantry

    15thusinfantry New Member

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    They appear to be made for the service (military), with the broad arrow mark and "B C" maker? The other marks I have no idea. I've had these in brass, steel and aluminum. None were ever marked, but they were US made. This is different, and I hope you can find out more about them. A lot of G.I.'s carried them also. Maybe of WWI manufacture. It's hard to say.
     
  4. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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    I used all my google-fu and could find no issue brass knuckles. There were US and British trench knives with a handle sporting knuckles, but no knuckles in themselves. I don't doubt many a soldier bought his own before shipping out, along with various scary knives and what-not.

    I suspect that broad arrow is just a bit of chicanery from somebody making and selling them. Keep them as a paperweight and an heirloom of your grandfather.
     
  5. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Also wondered about the usefulness of BK's, as a trench knife would be more effective.
    They banned trench knives due to the 3 sided blade, whose wound was much more difficult to treat. If recalling correctly.
     
  6. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Well if you got into a bar fight where you really didn't want to kill anyone but wanted a bit of an edge .....
     
  7. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Yeah, thug weapon.
    Was issued kit meant for social brawling or for fighting the enemy. BK's would be a last choice for trench warfare.
     
  8. mac_bolan00

    mac_bolan00 Member

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    i wouldn't be surprised with regard to its manufacture and use in world war 1. the last time a mace was issued to soldiers (head interchangeable with a pick or mattock.)

    [​IMG]
     
  9. mac_bolan00

    mac_bolan00 Member

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    from another war forum, labeled as "WW1 trench weapons." i see brass knuckles near to the left, beside the brass knuckled trench knife.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. 15thusinfantry

    15thusinfantry New Member

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    I use Yahoo and I found lots of images of knuckle dusters. A popular weapon/backup in both WWI and WWII. They saw lots of trench use, where it was kill or be killed. Soldiers fought savagely in the trenches using what they carried or had, the same was true in WWII.
     
  11. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Of all the weapons on that board, BK's would probably be the last chosen by anyone who had to make a choice...Bk's may be the easiest to conceal which might be its' only advantage over any other weapon shown there.
     
  12. the_diego

    the_diego Member

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    Re : Brass knuckles. Something tells me soldiers back then carried weapons to protect themselves not just from the enemy as defined by the Geneva Accords. Regimental "punch ups" seemed to be a normal occurrence.
     
  13. chibobber

    chibobber Member

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    In many jurisdictions these would be illegal to own. Other weapons illegal on their face could be: Dirks,stilettos,billy clubs,switch blades,throwing stars,and any other weapons deemed to be dangerous just for existing.The mere possession could get you arrested.
    No I do not agree with all of this,just pointing out that there are laws and ordinances out there that could lead to legal trouble.
    By the way,Sap gloves are a better weapon than brass knuckles.
     

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