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Otto - Pritzker Military Museum & Library - Chicago, Illinois, USA

Discussion in 'WW2 Forums/Forces Postal Service' started by Otto, Jan 28, 2017.

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  1. Otto

    Otto No More Half Measures Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Username: Otto
    Postmark: 19 January 2017
    From: Pritzker Military Museum & Library - Chicago, Illinois, USA

    I previously wrote in my Logbook about my recent visit to Chicago's Pritzker Military Museum & Library. While there I was able to see the impressive oil painting by James Dietz entitled "The Crossing: The 132nd Infantry Regiment at Guagalcanal". I took the opportunity to get a postcard and send it off from a mailbox right around the corner from the painting that inspired the card.

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    In case you didn't see my log entry, I'm including a photo I took of the original piece of art on the same day I sent the postcard.
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    Last edited: Apr 12, 2017
    TD-Tommy776, Owen and The_Historian like this.
  2. Otto

    Otto No More Half Measures Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Thanks to O.M.A. who reported the broken link for the image. It has now been corrected.
     
  3. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist

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    Great painting!
     
  4. Otto

    Otto No More Half Measures Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    In general, I don't really like the in-action-dramatic-fight-scene type paintings. To me a scene like this one of men moving out against an unseen enemy is much more dramatic and ominous despite the lack of gunfire. Dietz also does a great job of conveying a soldier realistically. In WWII these troops are generally lanky and weathered, and some historical artists apply a bit too much muscle and heroic stature to their soldiers. This group of grunts are are haggard and visibly tired. It's nice to see the original piece "in the flesh" as it is 6 feet wide or so, so your field of view is fully consumed if you are standing in front of it.

    A really nice work of art.
     

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