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Painting Canopies

Discussion in 'World War 2 Hobbies' started by Boba Nette, Jul 26, 2004.

  1. Boba Nette

    Boba Nette New Member

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    If you're gonna be doing aircraft,make sure you have plenty of tape on hand for painting the canopies.What a pain in the ass.Taping and trimming the frames is the only reason I don't do many planes.An absolute pain in the ass.
     
  2. Roel

    Roel New Member

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    I get enough trouble keeping the canopies glue-free. I've never even dared to try painting one! :cry:
     
  3. me262 phpbb3

    me262 phpbb3 New Member

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    yeap, but is the only way a plane will look good, thers is another way to paint the canopie with a liquid mask is call ez mask by ambroid, but also a pain in your rear area, but what the heck that is the hobby, enjoy it !!!
     
  4. Boba Nette

    Boba Nette New Member

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    Give it a try.It is a total pain in the ass but the effect is worth it.It really makes a plane such as a Stuka or Helldiver stand out.
     
  5. me262 phpbb3

    me262 phpbb3 New Member

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    try this on 1/72 scale planes, that realy s****
    but as Sturmtiger pointed is worth it
     
  6. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    Yeah - I use one of 2 methods:

    1) by hand, with a very fine brush. Good for curved pieces that are hard to mask, and you can do the whole thing in one go. Problem - looks a bit 'wobbly', and it is easy to acidently paint over the clear bits.

    2) masking tape. Since I lost my fine tape, I've just used ordinary masking tape. Problems - takes ages, as you can only do a couple of bits at a time, plus you get raised edges on the frames from the paint, plus it does not work easily for curved frames!

    It is worth it, and I recommend the masking tape method on planes with a heavily framed cockpit for giving a really good effect.
     
  7. Skua

    Skua New Member

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    I paint canopies by freehand. I use a trimmed brush and it works fine for me, but then I´ve painted a lot of canopies and should have some practise by now. I do have one nice little trick though, it doesn´t work with enamels like Humbrol, you have to use acrylics ( I´ve only used Tamiya myself but it should work with any acrylics ). Any excess paint can easily be removed with a toothpick or a match. But don´t use plastic toothpicks as these can scratch the clear plastic.
     
  8. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    For enamels, if you want to remove any 'excess' paint, you have to wipe it off immediately with a tissue or cotton bud/Q Tip.
    I find cotton buds work best. It may smear a touch, but wiping the smear immediately with a cotton bud dipped in Thinners/white spirit should remove this.

    Such wiping does, of course, mean that most of what you have painted will also be wiped off.

    Quite frustrating.

    Acrylics are brilliant for painting - easy to clean brushes, to remove 'spills', easy to paint with...
    Why do I use enamels?
    I was born stubborn!
     

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