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PLEASE HELP ME. PLEASE!

Discussion in 'Information Requests' started by aznrevolution19, May 1, 2006.

  1. aznrevolution19

    aznrevolution19 recruit

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    Hi. I'm a high school student and i need to get my report done by 5/19th.
    My questions are..

    During WWII, were the soldiers in this country provided with sufficient clothing to fight wars at their 100%? Yes, ONLY soldiers.
    the countries are: Great Britain, Japan, and Soviet Union

    more than one information per country would be VERY helpful.

    please help FAST. thanks
     
  2. Flyboy to be AKA SASKID

    Flyboy to be AKA SASKID Member

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    Soviet Union-NO for a lot of them would freeze to death by Finnish Forces Trapping them by splitting them up into smaller groups and just cut them off.
    Japan- Most likely a yes not sure need someone to support me on this but considering the weather i doubt anyone ever froze to death but maybe having a heat stroke from to MUCH clothing.
    Great Britain-In Germany maybe not sure of this either for it depends where they are fighting in Africa i bet they had to MUCH but in Germany's Winter maybe they didn't have enough clothing.
    Thats all i know try doing some research.
     
  3. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Aquila non capit muscas

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    As far as the SU is concerned, there was some lack of preparation for the Winter War against Finland, but the lesson was learnt and for the rest of the war bar some local exceptions the Krasnoarmeisk was well equipped with appropriate clothing and boots.

    Many good photos of Soviet soldiers here
     
  4. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    After the Barbarossa begun the Soviets got several million conscripts ( I recall a figure of some 5 million new conscripts by July 1941 ) which I doubt could all be clothed and armed properly.
     
  5. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Aquila non capit muscas

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    Yes, Kai, that's why I included a link to a number of photos. Of course you will reply that these photos would have to be approved by Censorship so 'improper' photos would not be shown. I think we're splitting hairs, what matters here is giving our new colleague a hand.
     
  6. Ron

    Ron Member

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    As people have said, the soviets were not prepared for a winter war with Finland but as far as i know the Soviets facing Germany were very well prepared for winter conditions with Germans many times using captures clothes from Soviets killed or captured.

    On the whole the UK did not suffer from any kind of clothing deficiency.

    On the whole Japan didn't suffer from any clothing deficiency.

    Of course there's always going to be small events in a certain battles or certain units that were not properly supplied with clothes for a short time but the only situation i can think of in which a country's entire military force was inadequetly supplied and completely caught with their pants down regarding weather was Germany in their first winter against the Soviets.

    Frankly, asking that question and not including Germany seems pretty pointless to me.
     
  7. Miller

    Miller Member

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    I don't recall where I read it but I remember the author saying that the Soviet infantry uniforms had no buttons, but ribbons that tied together.
     
  8. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Aquila non capit muscas

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    Officially the several uniforms used buttons, but I am prepared to believe that these have a tendency to fall off and can be locally replaced by ribbons as an expedient here and there. Of course I have no idea how widespread the practice would be.

    I my self had a shirt cuff button that fell off a while ago and I had to wait a couple of weeks to go home and have it sown back! And I'm not in any war [​IMG]
     
  9. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    In no country was the clothing issued "100% sufficent."

    In Britain the issue battledress was pretty good. Early in the war the long trench coat and balaklava issued for cold weather was totally inadequite and difficult to fight in. A leather jerkin type carry-all issued briefly around D-day was despised as totally impractical. British soldiers were almost always provided a reasonable 'kit.' That is, they had messing equipment, a tea cup, pack, changes of clothing and, other basic necessities of life. On the whole the British soldier was not unduly poorly supplied or provided for.

    In Japan the legging type putees were poor for jungle use. Most soldiers received minimal uniform support and in combat were often reduced to wearing little more than rags. Of course, the enlisted soldier in the Japanese army was looked on as little more than "cattle" and not particularly treated well by their leaders.
    The Japanese soldier usually went into combat with nothing more than he was carrying and could expect little other than ammunition and the occasional food ration while there.

    The Soviet Union generally issued soldiers a single summer or winter uniform. Often, what was issued was what was available. If nothing was available, then drafted soldiers might even fight in civilian attire!
    Issue kit was minimal. Tents, blankets and, other items of kit generally issued in other armies was very much hit and miss, more often miss. The Soviet soldier was very often on his own for supplying his basic needs from scavenging food to providing himself basic hygene items. Helmets were issued but many troops refused to wear them for various reasons.
    Troops given summer uniforms often did not receive their winter equipment even when conditions should have gotten them issued months before.
     
  10. Otto

    Otto Rested & Resupplied with MREs. Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Moved to Info Requests Forum.
     

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