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Private Modelling Designs

Discussion in 'World War 2 Hobbies' started by Ricky, May 24, 2005.

  1. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    I think we should see these plans... :wink:
     
  2. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    Please, professionals call them "drawings", only cheap spy novels, tabloid newspapers and TV documentaries call them plans. Likewise "blueprints", I've been in engineering design for 30+ years and only ever seen ONE genuine blue print....
    Oli
     
  3. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    But I'm not a professional... :grin:
    I too designed the 'best ever' fighter plane when in school. However, I somehow never got around to submitting it to BaE
     
  4. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    Don't know if you've come across it yet, but Whatifmodelers.com is well worth a look. They're interested mainly in aircraft, although I posted some of my tanks there (also in the modelling section here under "some of my tanks" strangely enough"). They have everything from seriously good modellers to guys who just post "schoolboy" aeroplane ideas, but they do a fair bit of digging out real-world "what if ideas" as well.
    I think they do it for two reasons.
    1) Anybody with any brains who has built a model must have thought at , some time, "what would happen if they had this (whatever) on it?" and they build it.
    2) to really piss off the JMNs (Joyless Modelling Nazis = obsessive rivet-counter types) at Telford IPMS open day when they put their models on display next to the tedious I've-been-researching-this-subject-for-forty-years-and-still-can't-find-out-if-pilot-had-dark-grey-or-mid-grey-handkerchiefs. Way to go guys.
    Designed any tanks? That'd be a topic but we'd have to make it serious one, see existing design topic, no X-Box etc
    Oli
     
  5. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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  6. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    My tanks are on there, but I haven't done any aircraft for a while, although I'm working on a MiG-21/ F-104 hybrid which looks like a Brit 50s design.
     
  7. fsbof

    fsbof Member

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    Oli - I have been in the land planning/design/construction industry for 30+ years, and have never run across an old style "blueprint" in the real world, though we had them in school as examples of how drawings used to be reproduced. Your comment brought to mind one of the stupidest magazine ads I've ever seen. This was about 15-20 years ago - the ad was a 2-page spread for some building or structure. To convey the impression that the structure was professionally designed, the ad showed a model of the structure placed on top of a set of "blueprints" (the old type - white lines and blue background) of the structure. To round out the "professional" setting, the ad's art director had placed some other design-related items in the scene, including a couple old inking pens and an opened bottle of white ink ! :grin:
     
  8. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    Yeah, the one I saw (IIRC about 31/32 years ago during my apprenticeship) was the only copy of a particular drawing that the firm had, and they hadn't got round to redoing it. I've only ever seen the inking pens because my dad had a set from when he studied architecture. Give me a Staedtler draughting pen set if I can't have a 3D CAD system... :lol:
     
  9. me262 phpbb3

    me262 phpbb3 New Member

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    i have autodesk architectural desktop 3.3 ( autocadd 2002) and autocadd 2000
     
  10. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    I have Autocad LT (copied from my last job - so I could print stuff at home for the boss - I had a better printer than the firm I worked for), MegaCAD, DesignCad 3D -solid modelling package for about £150 when I bought it, and somewhere I have the beta for Solid Edge - about £15-20 THOUSAND. Never got round to installing it, I preferred Bravo solid modeller.
    I never worked out why Autocad became an "industry standard" in the engineering profession, it's basically an architectural package with add-ons. I can use, I've taught it, but I don't like it.
     
  11. fsbof

    fsbof Member

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    I use my 35-year old old Koh-I-Noor "Rapidographs" when I have to draft with ink (which is about once every 5 years) - I love 'em. :smok:
     

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