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Recommendations?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by crunkyjens, Dec 10, 2007.

  1. Moscow

    Moscow Member

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    When I read about the book, the one thing that immediately came into question is why a Frenchman would be fighting in the German army.

    I will read the threads, thank you.

    What part of MI are you from? I was raised in Detroit's suburbs.
     
  2. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    There are so many books to recommend it's hard to start naming them. I'll echo lwd's suggestion about looking through the threads on this site to see what others suggest.
     
  3. Moscow

    Moscow Member

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    LR, you are in PA, cool, I live in Lancaster.
     
  4. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I have a particular interest in a specific personal account. See my signature.
     
  5. harolds

    harolds Member

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    Sajer was a common private. It could very well be that he says he's in such and such place when he was not. However, he does NOT portray himself as a hero, in fact quite the opposite. Therefore, I tend to feel it was a fairly autobiographical even though some details could be wrong. Heck, even senior generals and historians make errors so some of the quibbles about it are overblown. Sajer was from Alsace which has been alternately governed by France and Germany since the Franco-Prussian war. It was considered part of Germany by the German government in WW2. Therefore, young men were considered to be eligible for conscription. Quite a few men from that province served in the German Army.
     
  6. ColHessler

    ColHessler Member

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    Just look through the book review thread. I've written one of two reviews and maybe you can find somethings there.
     
  7. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Another option is a book I helped to edit some 8 years or so ago,
    Eastern Inferno
    [​IMG]
    It is essentially a translation of German soldier's diary spanning the years 1941 to 1943, when he was MIA during the destruction of Army Group Center and presumed dead. His body was not recovered.

    He provided some excellent first-hand insights and I highly recommend the book if you want to read of a common soldier's experience, written at the time it occurred.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2018
  8. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I agree with Jeff. Eastern Inferno is a good examination of what it was like for the common German soldier on the Eastern front.
     
  9. Moscow

    Moscow Member

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    One of the great things about this thread is the list of books here, is not what one would find on a list of "World War 2 Books Everyone Should Read."
    :thumbup:
     
  10. Otto

    Otto Made of plastic. Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I cannot say how pleased it makes me to see an imported thread kick up some new activity.

    We have an extensive collection of threads discussing books here, and even a dedicated area for Book Reviews. We also have a good number of authors here, a few of whom replied in this thread. It makes me realize I should do a better job identifying members who are authors.
     
  11. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Geronimo By William B. Breyer has stayed on my mind on US Paratroopers.
     
  12. Otto

    Otto Made of plastic. Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I'll strongly recommend "With the Old Breed" by E. B. Sledge, a book I've mentioned more than a few times on these forums. It's a first-hand, raw, and honest look at a Marine who saw combat in Peleilu and Okinawa.

    I used to have a signed copy of his book, it was heartrendingly destroyed in a flood a few years back. I lost approximately 700 books in that flood, and that one was probably the toughest loss.
     
  13. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I can only imagine, GroFaz. Tough loss, to say the least.
     
  14. Otto

    Otto Made of plastic. Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    It was tough and surprisingly emotional. It was only in the last few months that I could actually open some of the boxes of books I knew were destroyed. I took a few photos, I might share them to spread the misery.
     
  15. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana WW2|ORG Editor

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    Ya got a couple hundred waiting for you here. No rush.
     
  16. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Just remembered reading Currahee many years ago and found it a very interesting account then. Been decades though.
     
  17. Moscow

    Moscow Member

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    Perhaps different than the norm here, this book. Alfred Lee Loomis, someone I bet you've never heard of unless you read about the scientists coming up the physics leading to the A-bomb or the early years of radar. This man was a supra-genius. A lawyer, investor, scientist and inventor who could play chess, it is said, with 3 opponents simultaneously with his back turned to the chess boards. His roll in ww2 was working on the science leading to the a-bomb and some radar work. He did this from his home! He had, if I recall correctly, the best physics lab in the country, at his home in the 1940s.
    https://www.amazon.com/Tuxedo-Park-...F8&qid=1524528965&sr=1-1&keywords=tuxedo+park
     

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