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Romania's Role In The Holocaust Exposed

Discussion in 'Concentration, Death Camps and Crimes Against Huma' started by Spartanroller, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. Spartanroller

    Spartanroller Ace

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    Romania's Role In The Holocaust Exposed : NewsTime : World News

    Romania's role in the Holocaust and the deportation of Jews during World War II were minimized by the government after the fall of communism 1989.

    This is particulary sensitive and during communist times Romania effectively ignored the involvement of its leaders in war crimes.

    This changed in 2004 when following a dispute with Israel over comments about the Holocaust, then-President Ion Iliescu assembled an international panel led by Nobel-prize winner Elie Wiesel to investigate the Holocaust in that country.
     
  2. Spartanroller

    Spartanroller Ace

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  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Odessa

    Romanian army units assembled 19,000 Jews in a public square in the harbor area and shot many of them. They doused others with gasoline and burned them alive. At least 20,000 other Jews were assembled at the local jail and then taken to the village of Dalnik. There, the Romanians shot some of the Jews and locked others into warehouses that they then set ablaze.

    In November 1941, the Romanian authorities ordered the remaining 35,000 Jews in Odessa into two ghettos, Dalnik and Slobodka, established on the edge of the city. Many died of exposure, disease, and starvation over the next three months. In January and February 1942, Romanian police and military personnel deported the surviving 19,295 Jews from the Odessa ghettos to Romanian-administered camps and ghettos in the Berezovka region in Transnistria, including Bogdanovka, Domanevka, and Akhmetchetka.
     

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