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Russian glider tank

Discussion in 'The Tanks of World War 2' started by jeaguer, Feb 14, 2006.

  1. jeaguer

    jeaguer New Member

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    a rather silly one about flyboys tank and weird design

    is there any truth to the allegation than the russian tried a glidder light
    tank to attack air fields the stupid thing is supposed to have progressed
    up to prototype and try

    jeaguer
     
  2. merlin phpbb3

    merlin phpbb3 New Member

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    FLY TANK

    Quite correct OZ, picture just released!
     
  3. lynn1212

    lynn1212 New Member

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    have to blame christie for this one

    it was true but the details are different. what you are refering to was most likely the christie model M-1932. it was a very light tank [ 5 ton] with a double wall hull [ inner skin of duralumin] 4 road wheels, 750 hp hispano suiza aircraft engine, 1 37mm main gun, 1 mg. it had a set of biplane wings with a boom tail and a prop mounted high over the hull. a prototype was built and sold to the russians and nothing more was ever heard of it. it seems to have been meant as a jumper rather than as a true flyer. possibilty was able to clear a 20 ft gap. no report of ever really flying. there is a line drawing of it in the book tank by macksey/ batchelor, ballantine books. IIRC the brits built a light tank called the locust that was meant for glider delivery as well. i think it saw combat [market garden maybe?]
     
  4. lynn1212

    lynn1212 New Member

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    my bad

    correction; locust was a us tank, the british one was the tetrarch. both were meant for glider delivery and reportably both saw action.
     
  5. aglooka

    aglooka Member

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  6. Canadian_Super_Patriot

    Canadian_Super_Patriot recruit

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    I think the tank in question , is the T-26.
     
  7. aglooka

    aglooka Member

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    i have to disagree. The page states its a T60 and on the picture, it seems to be a T60 indeed. Could be one of the other lights of the same the series, T40 etc, but certainly not a T26 which had a completely different suspension from that visible on the picture.

    Aglooka
     
  8. jeaguer

    jeaguer New Member

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    Thanks Aglooka , that match exactly the story I got up to releasing of the
    tug line because of overheating engines and having good gliding
    characteristic , for a brick

    there was a link about what i though were fantaisist german prototypes

    perkele
     
  9. aglooka

    aglooka Member

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    well, the japanese had simlilar plans :

    http://mailer.fsu.edu/~akirk/tanks/japa ... 3-kuro.jpg

    looks like a doctored photograph tough.

    The Brits made an autogiro jeep:

    http://www.aeroflight.co.uk/mus/uk/musarmy/army13.jpg

    and a rota-Valentine was planned:

    http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/AC/aircraf ... y-jeep.php
    http://unrealaircraft.com/roadable/rotabuggy.php

    and the wierd inventor Christie was working on something similar:

    http://www.roadabletimes.com/roadables- ... istie.html
    also:
    http://www.geocities.com/firefly1002000/christanks.html

    Aglooka
     
  10. jeaguer

    jeaguer New Member

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    Aglooka , this is great , sorry to push you but are you aware of any
    modern plans ?
    or is it just all air transported and/or parachuted now?
     
  11. aglooka

    aglooka Member

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    afaik now light tanks and afv's can be parachuted. The Russians also worked with retro - rockets.
    Another way of delivery is pushing the vehicle (on a suitable shock absorbing pallet) out of the back of a low flying plane. A parachute was used to slow the forward motion but not to brake the fall in those cases.

    Anyhow, while the capability is still there i don't think that we'll ever see combat use for parachuted tanks as many of the "airborne" light afv's are specifically designed to be delivered by large helicopters. This method is much safer and ensures that the vehicle can go into combat almost immediately (which is the whole point of airborne operations)

    Aglooka
     
  12. liang

    liang New Member

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    glider tanks

    Believe the Russians tested the "flying tanks" in the 30's. They were nothing more than light tanks with wings added on, along with rudimentary flight controls. They were to be lifted into the air by massive transports, once released, they "glide" to their landings. The wings can be easilty jettisoned before the tanks head into battle. Thankfully the concept was abandoned after a few trials, apparently the task of landing a flying tank proved too difficult even for veteral test pilots, let alone an average WWII Russian tank crew.
     
  13. TISO

    TISO New Member

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    Antonov KT (Krilya Tanka) drawings and article in Russian.
    http://mkmagazin.almanacwhf.ru/avia/krylya_tanka.htm

    It was a T-60.

    Problems were with controling the glider. Flight controls were connected to the turret and gun barrel i.e. one controled the flying with rotation of the turet and depression of the gun barrel. Problems arose with inaccuracies of the turret and barel controls caused by forces acting on flight conrols (aileron, elevator, rudder) and consequently on the turret and barrel.

    This is one of the reasons for abandoning the project. Other more important reason was that at that stage (1942) T-60 cold hardly be called a tank anymore. T-60 had a 20mm main gun, was lightly armored and had a two man crew:
    http://mkmagazin.almanacwhf.ru/armor/t_60.htm

    I'd say that Christie was a genious. His work on his suspension was totaly unrecognised in the US, but was used on some of the most important allied tanks in Europe (T-34, BT-series, Crusader, Cromwell...). BTW his tank which he sold to Soviets evolved into BT-7 ( with 86 km/h the fastest tank around for a long, long time) could be considered as forerunner of T-34.
     
  14. liang

    liang New Member

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    Thanks for the great info. It makes sense that "tanks" that were designed for airborne troops had to be limited by weight, thus limiting the calibre of the gun and armor. Although most modern MBT can be airlifted by giant transports nowadays, armies around the world are working on light AFVs that can be lifted by choppers. Believe the British built one out of composite materials and carried a small caliber weapon (30mm?).
     
  15. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    You mean the Scimitar/Scorpion/etc?

    A whole family of light tracked vehicles made from aluminium composites to save weight. There were numerable versions, including ambulances etc, but the 2 fighting versions had a 76mm gun (now withdrawn from service) and a 30mm cannon (still in service).

    They were so light that they actually have a lower ground pressure than a man on foot.
     
  16. Gunter_Viezenz

    Gunter_Viezenz New Member

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    Didnt the Americans have 1 that had its armour out of aluminum? I think I;ve seen it on the discovery chanels program 10best tanks of all time, but I forgot the name, also think it could shoot rockets...
     
  17. TISO

    TISO New Member

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    Sheridan. They were used in Vietnam and 2.nd gulf war (1991)
     
  18. tom!

    tom! recruit

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    Hi.

    The japanese version wasn´t only a design study. They even built a wooden mock-up.

    [​IMG]

    experimental type 3 flying tank So-Ra

    data:

    length: 4070 mm
    width: 1440 mm
    height: 1890 mm
    weight: 2900 kg

    wings attached:
    length: 12800 mm
    width: 22000 mm
    height: 3000 mm
    weight: 4200 kg

    gasoline engine
    power: 50 hp at 2400 rpm
    speed: 43km/h

    crew: 2 men

    armament:
    1 X type 1 37 mm tank gun or
    1 X type 97 7,7 mm MG or
    1 X type 100 flamethrower

    The development was stopped in late 1943.

    Yours

    tom! :wink:
     

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