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Scratchbuilding - Rant #2

Discussion in 'World War 2 Hobbies' started by Ricky, Sep 4, 2007.

  1. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    Ok guys, this is my last one, I promise.

    Scratchbuilding. I started it fairly late into my modelling career, and it definately made the whole process much more enjoyable. You can customize you kit how you like, you can convert vehicle A into vehicle Ab, it is endless fun.

    My rant - similar to my 'scales' rant - is about how scratchbuilding (and even conversions) are perceived, and how they are portrayed in modelling magazines. Why? Because this is what put me off from trying it out earlier.


    Returning again to the same modelling magazine as in my previous rant.

    They had a scratchbuilt Bison (a civilian lorry with a concrete pillbox loaded on the flatbed). Which was potentially very interesting... until I saw the word 'plasticard'. Everything any modeller does seems to be done with 'plasticard'. It took me a long time to find anywhere that I could buy this wondrous material (I was without internet), and when I located it I also saw the price. What took me longer to see was the marked similarity between 'plasticard' and common household items, like credit cards.

    The only advantage that plasticard has is that it can be glued with poly cement. Other than that, I'm happy cutting up bits of old plastic cards and saving myself money. If I need a really thin bit I use cut-offs from a laminated sheet, or on one occaision paper that I coated in PVA glue (gives a lovely smooth finish without bulking it up).

    Furthermore, If you read through an article on making a model, they often add little bits to the kits, and typically they say 'I made (gismo x) from plasticard and lead wire'. And that is as helpful as it gets.
    As a young modeller I seriously thought that scratchbuilt models could only be made using specialist products by very experianced modellers.
    Similarly, I was under the strong impression that converting a kit could only be done by purchasing a conversion kit, usually at great expense, usually in resin (a bugger to work with) and usually for bigger scales than 1/72.


    And then I discovered that you can use almost anything, along with a little ingenuity.

    Fuse wire is excellent for a number of things, from aerials & wires to cigarettes & bullet cases. Ordinary electric wire stripped from an obsolete cable or aerial do just as well. Twist a few strands together and you have a towing cable.

    Credit cards, or any plastic card at all makes great building material.

    Filler is the king, your best friend. As is your spares box.
     
  2. JCalhoun

    JCalhoun New Member

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    You are correct. I'm not real keen on spending a lot of money on specialized products went I can use something from around the house or garage. I think a lot of it could be a bit of snobbery on the magazine's part. I guess it looks better to say plasti-card rather than cut up credit card.
     
  3. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    As some examples of what an average modellor can do with such materials:

    This turret was built from an expired store loyalty car

    [​IMG]


    These side-skirts were built from offcuts of plastic laminate. The 'lump' is an accidental drop of glue that i did not notice until I painted it (the glue s clear and the plastic is clear!)

    [​IMG]


    The rack holding the fuel cans is made from PVA-covered paper and bits of a credit card.

    [​IMG]

    The fuel cans themselves were cast in resin by me - which is another technique that seemed mysterious and expensive until I found an article on how to do it, and discovered that it is very easy, and you can buy the resin etc at a car parts shop!
     
  4. PanzerProfile

    PanzerProfile New Member

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    Nice thread here Ricky. I like your Rants!
    Boy, am I glad you found out how to make close ups with your camera...
     
  5. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    Thanks. I actually found out how because my dad bought the same type of camera, and read the instruction manual. :oops:
     
  6. TISO

    TISO New Member

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    Scrachbuilding can be fun. I started with aicraft cockpits with humongusly overdimesioned detailes. :grin:

    Scrachbuilt 1/72 light 75mm infantry howitzer IG-18 (crew from ESCI PAK-40 with Revell Artilery set spare rifles, wheels from old 1/76 Airfix SdKfz-222) typicaly for me a couple of years later ACE produced a model of the thingie :evil: :
     
  7. TISO

    TISO New Member

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    A bit of schrach building in Pavla 1/72 kit of Yak UT-1b
    Cockpit is scrachbuilt (except for the seat which is kit's resin):
     
  8. TISO

    TISO New Member

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    UT-1b
    Control column was realy tricky as it is realy small. I managed to do this one in IIRC in fourth or fifth try.
     
  9. TISO

    TISO New Member

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    Yak UT-1b
    Note about colours used:
    I went for AII colours ( considering that UT-1b were navy modification of refurbished standard UT-1's in mid 1942)
    green - Humbrol 151 (US interior green)
    black - Revell 9 (antrazit)
    lt. blue - Humbrol 65 with tuch of gray ( not enough)

    Interior:
    wood use aerolack - intermediate blue with tuch of gray (not enough gray) and
    metal primer - Humbrol sky type S ( i can't remember the colour number)
     
  10. Simonr1978

    Simonr1978 New Member

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    Very nice work Tiso, I'm extremely impressed.
     
  11. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    :eek:

    Excellent. I am seriously impressed.
     
  12. wozwasnt

    wozwasnt New Member

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    I'm scratchbuilding a 1/16 RC Jagdpanther


    [​IMG]

    complete with a BB gun

    [​IMG]

    I made plans from a 1/35 scale then made a card mock up
    [​IMG]
     
  13. JCalhoun

    JCalhoun New Member

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    Very interesting! :D
     
  14. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    Wow! :eek:
     
  15. Boba Nette

    Boba Nette New Member

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    Now that's a red-blooded male for ya!Builds a big model tank that can actually blast something.Way to go!
     

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